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Why isn't golf attracting more new players? - Page 9

Poll Results: What's the major reason golf isn't attracting many new players

 
  • 34% (78)
    Economy - disposable income is down
  • 12% (27)
    A round of golf just takes too long these days
  • 6% (14)
    Bad image - people think golf is for the old and rich
  • 2% (5)
    Tiger isn't playing as well as he used to
  • 0% (2)
    Rules are too complicated
  • 6% (14)
    Golf clubs are too expensive
  • 8% (18)
    Greater time demands from family and job
  • 0% (2)
    USGA is taking the fun out of golf - Anchored stroke ban
  • 10% (23)
    Golf is too hard and frustrating to play
  • 0% (0)
    Not enough qualified instructors for kids
  • 1% (4)
    Lack of public courses in your area
  • 0% (2)
    Not enough golf ranges in your area
  • 0% (2)
    Insufficient coverage by mainstream media
  • 0% (2)
    Fear of playing as single or with strangers
  • 13% (31)
    Golf is doing fine, there are no problems with it.
224 Total Votes  
post #145 of 192
Personal testimony here, started playing a little under two years ago at age 20 growing up I was a hockey player year round and traveled tons with no time to take up another sport....after I quit living the NHL dream I hung up the skates and decided to take on something else, naturally golf was my choice!

But what I found was the biggest reason someone would shy away from golf was the manner in which employees in the pro shop treat younger players.

I've found on numerous occasions that the guys running the tee sheet/ register are flat out rude and disrespectful because of my lack of knowledge (at the time) of the game of golf since I was a newbie.

Like I'm supposed to know all the ins and outs of golf before I'm allowed to step foot on a course, and I think that attitude has rubbed many the wrong way and left a sour taste in their mouth with the sport as a whole!

It only takes one good or bad expierence with anything to make someone either love it or hate it!
post #146 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Martin View Post


$40 for a round of golf isn't cheap in my book. Can't see where young people will be shelling out that to play the game when $40 can get them so much more elsewhere.

That's true, cheap is very much relative to the person. That's $40 peak season at prime time at some fairly nice courses. IMHO it isn't to bad given other places I have played you can't find a decent round of golf under $60 for similar time frames. It all depends on how into the game a young kid is, if they are really into golf you can get student or junior memberships for a good deal.

post #147 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Martin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JxQx View Post

Golf seems to be doing well around my area. I see a lot more people getting into the game because it is fairly cheap ($40 a round). Overall, I'd say its a money thing. People are less likely to play when they don't have as much disposable income.


$40 for a round of golf isn't cheap in my book. Can't see where young people will be shelling out that to play the game when $40 can get them so much more elsewhere.

 

Yeah.... they'll spend it wisely, like for a carton of cigarettes, or another week worth of minutes on the cell phone.  e3_rolleyes.gif 

post #148 of 192

In my opinion, I think the economy has a lot to do with it. I justify my 35-40 rounds a year and my equipment obsession because it's all I do as a hobby. But when I lost my job in 2009, I had all the time in the world to play and had to restrain myself. I played about 20 weekday rounds that year, half of what I normally play. I don't drink, smoke, gamble, play video games, join an expensive gym, or spend money on anything else because I save it all golf. I also have a great wife who is not high maintenance and realizes golf is my realease. 

 

Time has a lot to do with it as well, but let's face it, $75 bucks or more a round is a lot of money for a privately owned public course. Even if you play at one of the Long Island muni's like I do ($35-$45 walking at Bethpage and/or Eisenhower Park) the tee times that are family friendly are very difficult to get unless your are like me and get on line between 3A-5A to make sure you are one of the 1st tee times each Saturday morning. But I realize I'm nuts. It's my only other true love in life besides my family! 

post #149 of 192
I haven't seen much change in my area, which we have 77 courses in my county. Which it does help having a wide variety in price range and quality of courses. I know starting out golf has a big commitment both financially and in time. I know when I was younger I was seeing two rounds of golf as a pair of Jordans. One of which I would have a lot longer. Now I have learned to appreciate the game and the time out.
post #150 of 192

I think it's the fact that golf is seen as the game of the old and rich. Combined with the high cost of entry (clubs, the cost of a round, etc.), young people will choose a sport where all you need is a ball to play. I read a book called Golf For The Rest Of Us by E. Vargo that makes the case for sped up play and fewer clubs to get young people involved.

post #151 of 192

Because its boring.

post #152 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by RetroJFrancisco View Post

Because its boring.
You think it's boring but you're posting on a golf forum?
post #153 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by RetroJFrancisco View Post

Because its boring.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by walk18 View Post

You think it's boring but you're posting on a golf forum?

The question was about "new players."  Dude's a 1 handicap, so I don't think he qualifies as "new."  And I think he's very right.  That is absolutely one answer you'll get when you ask non-golfers for reasons why they don't golf.

post #154 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by RetroJFrancisco View Post

Because its boring.

rili........

post #155 of 192

before i started the game, i thought it was dumb.  i'd roll my eyes at people that said they were addicted to golf.  i'd be annoyed as all hell to see golf on tv on sundays.   i'd say that golf isn't even close to a sport, and was more like billiards or bowling.   i started to play during trips to palm springs during the summer, and well, discovered how much of a fool i was for my former negative feelings.  karma caught me though, as its taken several years to play "reasonably" well.

post #156 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by walk18 View Post


You think it's boring but you're posting on a golf forum?

No, I dont.

But the question was about 'new' players.

And I simply gave an answer.

post #157 of 192

Perhaps we are on the cusp of an increase in interest in golf in the USA.  The "Baby Boom" generation started in 1946 and the original boomers are now 67.  More of us (I am 60) will join the ranks of the retired as the years go on.  I consider myself fortunate to have a passion for a game like golf that takes up so much time and energy.  When I retire, what the heck am I going to do from 7am to 7 pm every day?? Yes, I plan on some community service-type activities but golf is going to fill a large part of the time.

 

Frankly I am not too worried about the future for golf. 

post #158 of 192
In Scotland my club has a shortage of members just now. It is regarded as arguably the best course in the area and is in a strong position financially and membership numbers in comparison to neighbouring courses.

I would have to say 3 reasons to why this is the case........

1 economy
2 length of round time and practice time required to get good
3 increasing work demands balanced with a good family life.
post #159 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by supoffset View Post

I try to tee off at 530 AM just to avoid the endless waiting after every shot! I am done and home by 10 or 1030 and gives me plenty of time for other things!

Personally, I try to get out early & play too.  Only issue with that is you have to go to bed early the night prior which cuts out time you might spend with the wife, family, and/or friends.

post #160 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by stogiesnbogies View Post

Thanks, mate.

 

I think we can all recount tales of the shoddy manner which women golfers are often  treated at many clubs-private and public.  I can assure you that it is no better for Blacks, Latinos or any other minority which attempts to play golf .....then the golf establishment scratches their collective heads and can't understand why the game is in decline...perhaps it has something to do with the manner in which these "New Majority" golfers are "welcomed", eh?  LOL

 

Women have had to put up with a lot to play golf.

 

Women have taken to the courts and won lawsuits about access to the main dining room, and premium tee times. Here's the latest:

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2020463034_apwaspokanegolfbias1stldwritethru.html

 

Phoenix Country Club ended up in hot water for claiming they provided, get this: "Separate but equal facilities" for men and women. One long-term male member got expelled from the club for telling a New York Times reporter he thought the policy was discriminatory. Here's base story from a couple of years ago: http://www.azcentral.com/business/articles/2010/03/17/20100317phoenix-country-club-lawsuit0318.html?nclick_check=1

 

One note on terminology: US whites are shifting to plurality status: the largest subgroup of a population which has no majority group.

 

As for good news, I see plenty of African-American, Hispanic-American and Asian-immigrant and Asian-American players at the upscale semi-private clubs in the area. Lots of good players among them. (Interesting mini-trend: Korean-born karate instructors who are switching over to being golf teaching pros)

 

A big change from the 1950s, when black World War II veterans resorted to federal court lawsuits to gain access to municipal courses - we're not even talking country clubs!

 

Back to present day... As for adding new players across the board, I see two drags: the continuing Recession, and parents who are so involved in their kids' lives that there's no adult time for those under age 40.

post #161 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by ejimsmith View Post i'd say that golf isn't even close to a sport, and was more like billiards or bowling. (remainder of post notes learning curve and appreciation of the sport)

 

I have a general comment about the age old "it's not a sport" divergence.

 

It probably isn't if you want to really dig at it.  So what?

 

It's still fun - (people also like billiards and bowling)

 

for that matter - even if one doesn't want to directly call it a 'sport' (whatever that means today) - it's still an activity that, at the professional levels, someone who is very 'athletic' will have a big advantage.  So maybe it's not an athletic activity, but athletes will still do better because of a commit to fitness.  (with a few ridiculous exceptions, look at the best pros, they are very serious about strength and fitness - I think that's great).

 

There a LOT of activities like that and non-participants really shouldn't minimize the activity when they don't understand it.  With the varied levels of fitness of the population today, I'm grateful that there are so many activities to address whatever level of intensity people can handle.  Recreational golf serves to cover a range that badly needs a reason to get out and play vs sit around while still being challenging to everyone of every fitness level - that's pretty unique and very cool.

 

 

(of course, I also think it's silly to try to argue the other way.  it is what it is.)


Edited by rehmwa - 3/25/13 at 10:38am
post #162 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post

 

I have a general comment about the age old "it's not a sport" divergence.

 

It probably isn't if you want to really dig at it.  So what?

 

It's still fun - (people also like billiards and bowling)

 

for that matter - even if one doesn't want to directly call it a 'sport' (whatever that means today) - it's still an activity that, at the professional levels, someone who is very 'athletic' will have a big advantage.  So maybe it's not an athletic activity, but athletes will still do better because of a commit to fitness.  (with a few ridiculous exceptions, look at the best pros, they are very serious about strength and fitness - I think that's great).

 

There a LOT of activities like that and non-participants really shouldn't minimize the activity when they don't understand it.  With the varied levels of fitness of the population today, I'm grateful that there are so many activities to address whatever level of intensity people can handle.  Recreational golf serves to cover a range that badly needs a reason to get out and play vs sit around while still being challenging to everyone of every fitness level - that's pretty unique and very cool.

 

 

(of course, I also think it's silly to try to argue the other way.  it is what it is.)

I've played just about every "sport" that I ever had access to and golf is as much of a sport as any of them. You don't have to run or jump but that's not included in any definition of sport that I can find.

 

Sport:

  1. competitive physical activity: an individual or group competitive activity involving physical exertion or skill, governed by rules, and sometimes engaged in professionally

 

  1. pastime: an active pastime participated in for pleasure or exercise
  2. an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of a competitive nature, as racing, baseball, tennis, golf, bowling, wrestling, boxing, hunting, fishing, etc.
  3. a particular form of this, especially in the out of doors.
  4. diversion; recreation; pleasant pastime.
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