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Which clubs should I get? I'm a beginner.

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm wondering which clubs would be the best for a beginner. I've narrowed it down to the Pinemeadow Pre 16 piece set and the Callaway Strata 13 piece set. I've read a lot of good things about the Pinemeadow Pre set but I haven't heard much about the Callaway Strata set. With the Strata set do you really get Callaway quality or do they feel a lot cheaper than "real" Callaway clubs? If anyone has any experience with either please speak up! Thanks.

post #2 of 13

I know it's nice to get new clubs - I get that.    Alot of guys will tell you to get better quality name brand used gear.     Either way is fine for a beginner.     IMHO, don't bother with a fitting as many will recommend.      It's too early in your development - just get some clubs you like the looks of & start playing as much as you can.    Get some lessons if you want to ... depending on how into it you get, there's alot of resources available today (video's, TV, etc) and you can learn to play well on your own.     My only advice is don't spend alot of new clubs for now - buy a cheaper set, learn on it for a year or two ... at that time, if you really do take to the game & get serious, you'll have a much better feel for what you want to get to improve your game, and then drop some $$ on nice clubs.

post #3 of 13

I agree 100%, also make sure the clubs aren't cast. Get cavity back, they are more forgiving. Better for beginners.

post #4 of 13

If possible, you might combine lessons with club selection. Find a pro who could give you a couple of lessons and help you find the right clubs.

 

As for clubs, the Callaway Strata would be a sturdy, basic boxed set. Strata comes in a couple of different boxed sets: Clubs and a bag all in one to get you started. Get them at a golf shop if at all possible - you could hit them and clubs from other boxed sets and see which model you like best.

 

Even with boxed sets, you can get a basic static fitting: This checks to see if the clubs are the right length for you, have the proper grip thickness for your hand, and the proper lie angle. Again, the pro/clubfitter could tweak them for you if needed - eBay won't do this!

 

Beginners do not need more complex fittings - your swing will change a lot from day to day until it starts to stabilize, so fancy fittings won't do you much good.

post #5 of 13

As a beginner, I would suggest to ask your friends if they have an old set and just borrow the "Pitching Wedge and a Putter".

Then sign up for group lessons and learn the basics, grip, stance, swing, chipping, pitching and putting.

Next, walk a golf course late in the day and shag a bag of golf balls.

Now, practice, practice, practice hitting the wedge at a target in a field, or if you live near a course with a short range practice area.

Then you can walk out and retrieve the balls and see how close you are to your target.

Start with 50 yards, then progress in 10-15 yard increments.

Spend several weeks just with the wedge shots and work on pitching and chipping, putting equally.

When you can hit about 70-80% of these shots at the target with the wedge, then step up to the other short irons - 9,8,& 7.

Practice, practice, practice. Now it is feasible to spend a few bucks on a bucket of balls working on swing these irons, or continue to use the hit / retrieve method.

 

Next would be time to take lessons swinging long irons and woods.

Try to continue borrowing clubs from friends, believe me, no one will mind loaning their old clubs.

Practice, practice, practice. Don't forget to spend time around the green (putting & chipping).

 

Now, it would be time to play 9 holes, either with a friend or solo, late in the afternoon at a local course. Practice, play, practice, play. Now you should become more enlighten about equipment and develop an understanding of the different types of clubs manufactured.

 

Now is time to start shopping. Spend an hour at Golf Discount, Dicks, Galaxy just handling the different clubs. Club selection begins with feel and how the club looks at address. Most stores have Demo's and indoor hitting nets. Many of the stores have used/trade-in's for sale.

Talk with the sales guys in the stores about selecting clubs. They should be able to offer advice and guidance with your purchase. Consider selecting a set you will play for at least 5 years.

 

You will know when you find a club which you like, just do not rush into buying something to own.

 

Good luck and don't forget, practice, play and enjoy the game.

 

Club Rat

post #6 of 13

You definitely want to add a Cleveland Niblick to your bag - the best club from 100 yards out and less for any newbie.

post #7 of 13

I would heavily recommend the Walter Hagen XLR set. You get everything you need and it is a very good beginner's set. It comes with...

 

Driver (10.5*)

3W

3 Hybrid

4 Hybrid

5 Iron

6 Iron

7 Iron

8 Iron

9 Iron

PW

SW

Mallet Putter

 

Bag

Head covers for the Driver, 3W, 3H, and 4H.

 

They are cavity back and can be bought in steel and graphite shaft.

 

Best part.... they sell for $199. Affordable!

 

I had the Walter Hagen MS2 set which precedes the new XLR set. The sets are almost identical. I got back into golf about 2 years ago and beat my set to death and it held up and performed well the entire time. I got my 51 year old Father back into golf and he now has the XLR set and I have gotten new irons in that time period but my MS2s don't owe me anything.

 

Walter Hagen XLR set is highly recommend by me.

post #8 of 13

The Hagen XLR set isn't bad, but you'll find that you get what you pay for. If you like playing and think you'll stick with it, you'll find yourself upgrading relatively quickly as I went that route as well. 

 

For what very high quality used clubs, or last year's models go for, you can grab yourself a very nice set with better build quality & feel (and higher resale value) than many of the boxed sets. 

post #9 of 13

There has been a lot of good advice in this thread.

1) Get a cheap set of clubs - I recommend a used set on ebay - and a brand name - Callaway is a good starter, so is Adams, WIlson, Ping or TaylorMade.

2) Invest in lessons - my daughter started lessons at a local community college at age 11 - my wife invested in group lessons when she started after age 39 (age withheld for the benefit of my health)

3) Find a friend with similar interests and abilities that you have if possible, that will make the game more enjoyable - and give you a regular time to get out on the links
 

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
I went and got the Walter Hagen Xlr set last night along with some practice foam and waffle balls,18 cheap Wilson titanium balls, a practice net for the backyard, and a bag of tees, and I order a 12x3 foot practice putting green on ebay. A few of the local courses offer group lessons that are $99 for 4 90 minute lessons that I'm looking at doing next month or in April and my brother and a friend are interested in taking them as well. I've looked at several instructional videos on YouTube how to putt, chip, pitch, hit irons/hybrids/drivers as well. Any other suggestions for someone new?
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tec498 View Post

I went and got the Walter Hagen Xlr set last night along with some practice foam and waffle balls,18 cheap Wilson titanium balls, a practice net for the backyard, and a bag of tees, and I order a 12x3 foot practice putting green on ebay. A few of the local courses offer group lessons that are $99 for 4 90 minute lessons that I'm looking at doing next month or in April and my brother and a friend are interested in taking them as well. I've looked at several instructional videos on YouTube how to putt, chip, pitch, hit irons/hybrids/drivers as well. Any other suggestions for someone new?

Suggestions:

 

1) Have FUN. When it stops being fun.. take a break. Meaning, if you get too mad on the course, take a 5 min break. If you get mad on the range, go home. etc. Find the amount of break you need and take it when you get frustrated. And frustration WILL come.

 

2) Don't cheat yourself.

 a. On the range, do directed, specific practice. Try not to just beat balls. (Though that can be fun, you will have more fun hitting great shots vice hitting many, hard, shots)

 b. On the course, when you get there, if you keep score, keep an honest score. Putt everything out, take your penalty strokes, learn the rules, etc.

 

3) Read and study as much as you can handle. When not playing, go to this site and go to other resources. You already do this. Don't forget about it.

 

4) You're not good enough to get mad yet. (Neither am I!) So, when you hit a bad shot, just forget about it and hit it better next time. Golf is supposed to be relaxing. And it is, as long as you keep calm and stay realistic about your expectations. 

 

5) Have FUN!!!!!! 

post #12 of 13

Sounds like you've got a good game plan. Glad to see you picked up the XLR set. You won't be disappointed. They were a great starter set for myself and my father and until you feel like you're ready to move on to something better they are a great price for the meantime. 

 

Goodluck and have fun!

 

I also recommend checking out an online website called TheDanPlan. Very interesting and inspiring.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tec498 View Post

 Any other suggestions for someone new?

 

Read all you can & watch all the youtube video's on the Stack and Tilt golf swing ... it is intended to SIMPLIFY the golf swing & made a collosal difference in my game.      Keep that head centered and don't overswing.      My feeling is that lessons are fine, but it's ultimately on you ... put in the time, do the research and you'll get good - just remember, don't rely on lessons as they aren't magic, you have to put in the time.

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