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Putter Promiscuity - Page 2

post #19 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post


 He's recommending buying ONE more putter instead of another couple dozen.

Yup... this is what I was doing... His big focus seems to be on finding one that gives him the feel he wants as well as one that fits his stroke. If that's the case, Edel would be hard to beat.

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post

Wow!   You, sir, are a true putter hoe.     A ****ty Scotty strumpet.    A brazen Odyssey hussy.    A putter of ill repute.      A flatstick floozy.   A Taylormade tramp.    A trollop who only says YES!     A Kombi concubine.    

 

There is probably an addiction program that would help you through this sickness.    Maybe something called "putting lessons"?   

BTW... Great post. For whatever reason, when I read this I heard it in the voice of Barney Stinson from "How I Met Your Mother."

post #20 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by tristanhilton85 View Post

Yup... this is what I was doing... His big focus seems to be on finding one that gives him the feel he wants as well as one that fits his stroke. If that's the case, Edel would be hard to beat.


BTW... Great post. For whatever reason, when I read this I heard it in the voice of Barney Stinson from "How I Met Your Mother."

That post was "Legen - wait for it, and I hope you're not lactose intolerant because the second half of this word is - dary!"
post #21 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post

I thought that I had finally found THE putter that was going to work for me when almost two months ago, I purchased a SC Select Newport 2.  I had some success with it and things were going well.  Then I picked up a Odyssey Versa 1 Wide as a backup putter and really liked it.  I'm not a big fan of inserts though, they are okay but I prefer no inserts.  What I found out though was how the style of the 1 Wide fit my putting stroke much better than anything else I had putted with before.  My putting stroke is considered to be SBST (or as close to that as you can get, I am not trying to debate whether that is real or not).  The 1 Wide featured less offset and a shaft that went right into the putter instead of having a plumbers neck. 

Thus I purchased a Newport 2 Notchback that arrived last night and it felt like butter.  I also purchased a SC Studio Select Newport 2.7 because it is designed similarly.  It should arrive today.  I can only hope that this is finally the end of the road because I have blown so much money on putters, it's not funny.  Every time I think that I finally found the putter that I have been looking for, after a few weeks or months, I am lured to something else that seems and performs better.

Is anyone else out there a "putter playa"?  I am ashamed in a way to admit, but since I started golfing just 9 months ago, I have owned the following putters:

1)  Maxfli Mallet Putter that was my first putter, purchased at Dicks Sporting Goods
2)  Odyssey Rossie II Dual Force, I obtained from my Aunt as it was her old putter from the 1990's
3)  Odyssey White Ice 330 Mallet
4)  Odyssey White Hot XG 2 Ball
5)  Scotty Cameron California Sea Mist Fastback
6)  Odyssey White Hot XG Marxman
7)  Taylormade Ghost Spider S
8)  Scotty Cameron Select Golo
9)  Scotty Cameron Studio Select Newport 2
10) Scotty Cameron Studio Select Kombi-S
11) Odyssey Pro Type Tour Series Number 7
12) Scotty Cameron Select Newport 2
13) Odyssey Versa 1 Wide
14) Scotty Cameron Select Newport 2 Notchback
15) Scotty Cameron Studio Select Newport 2.7

Damn u are a putter *****! I thought I was bad. I only had about 7-8 putters at one time. Winters are dangerous cuz if I'm not playing golf, I'm buying something online........
post #22 of 45
Been playing my Odyssey White Hot 2 Ball Blade for 8 years now. As others have said, stick with one and then you may find some consistency with your results.

Why to do your part keeping the economy going LOL.
post #23 of 45

 

Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post

That's almost two a month. Maybe more if you've had any time away due to winter weather. How can you determine what works and what doesn't in that short time? I didn't tally it up but that's easily a couple grand spent on putters. No doubt you've sold a few to fund the purchases on your putter journey. Have you ever been in for a fitting?

 

15 putters in 9 months is a definite problem!  Dave's right.....you can't have any idea whether any of these are right for you or not simply because you haven't played/practiced with any of them long enough to really know.  You're also so new to the game that you likely have a lot of flaws in your putting stance and stroke.  It's the age old saying......it's the Indian, not the arrow.  You're caught up in buying new arrows when you should be learning how to better use the bow. 

 

Having said all that, I have to ask......what is it about your putting that you're unhappy with?  Is that handicap correct or an estimate?  If so, you're playing off 14 after less than a year which is very strong.  I doubt that your ball striking is so good that you're hitting a lot of greens in that short time, so your short game and putting must be pretty solid for the length of time you've been playing.  What's causing you to make these changes.....in other words, what specifically were you hoping to accomplish/gain with each new putter purchased?  We joke about it, but it's true, there are a lot of people who genuinely believe that there's nothing wrong with their golf game that can't be cured by their checkbook.  They're more caught up in the neat stuff than they are in really identifying the actual opportunities they have to improve their own performance.  In looking at your entire bag, you're got a great set of tools (assuming they fit).....now's the time to learn to really use them. 

post #24 of 45

To the OP - instead of changing putters, find a method and grip that works for you.

 

In modern times, I went from Pelz (Ugh), to Utley (mini-golf stroke) to Pat O'Brien with some Dave Stockton thrown in as to seeing the line, practice strokes (none), and focusing on a spot on your line instead of the ball With O'Brien, I found a neutral setup and a way to neutralize the right hand on the grip.

 

1. Find a setup that works for you so you have a consistent stroke and roll.

 

2. Once you are consistent with the setup, find a putter (Edel).

 

 

Hey, Scotty's are still attractive at the store because they are putter bling - a seductive temptress that like a hot woman, looks great on the outside, but whose performance and/or personality may be lacking. It's  a lot of form but can lack substance. It leaves you wanting in some aspects. At least that is my experience with about 10 Scottys over the years. I only say that because, yes, I know tour pros use them, but they are also fitted. Golfing Joe is not fitted. With an Edel, you're treated better than a pro as to fitting. Everything about the putter is fit to you. And that's tough to find - but first, find a method and grip -- and consistency.

post #25 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

 

15 putters in 9 months is a definite problem!  Dave's right.....you can't have any idea whether any of these are right for you or not simply because you haven't played/practiced with any of them long enough to really know.  You're also so new to the game that you likely have a lot of flaws in your putting stance and stroke.  It's the age old saying......it's the Indian, not the arrow.  You're caught up in buying new arrows when you should be learning how to better use the bow. 

 

Having said all that, I have to ask......what is it about your putting that you're unhappy with?  Is that handicap correct or an estimate?  If so, you're playing off 14 after less than a year which is very strong.  I doubt that your ball striking is so good that you're hitting a lot of greens in that short time, so your short game and putting must be pretty solid for the length of time you've been playing.  What's causing you to make these changes.....in other words, what specifically were you hoping to accomplish/gain with each new putter purchased?  We joke about it, but it's true, there are a lot of people who genuinely believe that there's nothing wrong with their golf game that can't be cured by their checkbook.  They're more caught up in the neat stuff than they are in really identifying the actual opportunities they have to improve their own performance.  In looking at your entire bag, you're got a great set of tools (assuming they fit).....now's the time to learn to really use them. 

 

I practice putting for at least an hour every day after work.  I try to go to the practice green as much as possible, but during the winter most of my practice has been at my house where I have installed a synthetic bent grass putting green downstairs that stimps at 10.5.  So I roll a lot of putts.  When I first started golfing, I was only a mallet guy.  I did not like the look of blades and thus used only mallets.  About two months ago I forced myself to try a blade and found out that I actually putted better with blades than mallets.  Now it comes down to just finding the right blade for my stroke and I think I have finally found the right putters (Newport 2 Notchback, Newport 2.7, Versa 1 wide).  All three of these putters feature not a lot of offset and shafts that connect directly to the putter head without a plumbers neck.  Because my stroke is SBST (or what is considered SBST), these putters seem to work the best.

 

To be honest, when I first started golfing, I really did not know much about golf or putting.  I read many books and started practicing a lot last fall and into this winter.  Thus up until that point I was just buying what looked cool and did not have any idea about how the design should fit my stroke.  Heck, I did not even know much about my stroke.  Starting last fall, I started reading a lot of putting books and I also started practicing a lot.  I tweaked my technique and learned a lot about my stroke and how certain designs of putters fit my stroke.  That is what has gotten me to this point that I am at now.  I know a lot of you think that I am nuts or whatever, but for me I think of it like a scientist that is trying to develop a new medicine or something:  it takes a lot of trial and error before you find what you are looking for.

 

Many people have told me to get fitted and get lessons.  I have been reluctant to do either and here's why: I have only been playing golf for less than 9 months.  In that time I have played around 75 rounds of golf.  That's not a lot of golf overall.  My swing and my putting stroke are still evolving as I continue to play and learn.  I continue to improve at this point because I have not played that much or for that long.  When I get to a point where I have truly learned the game and my swing/stroke, I'll then be happy to find a "partner" that can help me continue to improve.

 

Regarding the questions asked above.....There is nothing specifically that I am unhappy with regarding my putting, it's just a process that I continue to practice and tinker with to improve.  If getting fitted for a putter was the answer, then I would do it.  I know that it's not the end all answer though.  The fitting would find my preferred loft, lie, length, and other numbers, but that would not necessarily be right.  I believe that a fitting would only work if the putting stroke is very consistent.  I'm getting there through practice, but it takes time and I have not been playing/practicing for that long.  I look at a putter fitting as kind of like a matchmaker.  It may work, but it also may not work either........My handicap is not an estimate.  My "official" handicap through the Maryland Golf Association/USGA is "frozen" between Nov. 15 - Mar. 15 for any rounds I play in Maryland or north.  It's frozen at 15.  I have been keeping track of my running handicap though online using the same calculation that would be used if it were not frozen by including rounds that I have played in the winter and those numbers have my handicap at 14.2.

 

With each different club that I purchase, I hope to find the right club that matches my swing/stroke.  Since I have not been playing for very long and since I am improving, this means that my swing/stroke is changing a bit here, a bit there.  I'm sure that a year or so from now, once I have played golf for a while with a good number of rounds under my belt, I'll be at a point where things are not changing as much and I will hopefully have found the right equipment.

post #26 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

To the OP - instead of changing putters, find a method and grip that works for you.

 

In modern times, I went from Pelz (Ugh), to Utley (mini-golf stroke) to Pat O'Brien with some Dave Stockton thrown in as to seeing the line, practice strokes (none), and focusing on a spot on your line instead of the ball With O'Brien, I found a neutral setup and a way to neutralize the right hand on the grip.

 

1. Find a setup that works for you so you have a consistent stroke and roll.

 

2. Once you are consistent with the setup, find a putter (Edel).

 

 

Hey, Scotty's are still attractive at the store because they are putter bling - a seductive temptress that like a hot woman, looks great on the outside, but whose performance and/or personality may be lacking. It's  a lot of form but can lack substance. It leaves you wanting in some aspects. At least that is my experience with about 10 Scottys over the years. I only say that because, yes, I know tour pros use them, but they are also fitted. Golfing Joe is not fitted. With an Edel, you're treated better than a pro as to fitting. Everything about the putter is fit to you. And that's tough to find - but first, find a method and grip -- and consistency.

 

 

What is Edel?  I'm am not familiar with what that is.  Thanks for your feedback/help!

post #27 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post

 

 

What is Edel?  I'm am not familiar with what that is.  Thanks for your feedback/help!

http://www.edelgolf.com

 

Basically they are an equipment company that will fit you for a putter that fits you. Most people can't line up a putt inside the hole and so what they do is fit you for one that you can. Everybody sees a little differently and so a putter that looks square to me might look open to you. Things like the dots or lines on the top or cavity of the putter can mess with your alignment. They have tons of heads in different sizes, shapes and with different markings as well as different hosel designs and they will find the one that is right for you. After that they'll make sure that the weight is right for you so that you can effectively control your distance.

 

It's been posted before, but here is a general idea of what they do:

 

 

Taking a quick look at the website, the closest fitter to the DC area is at Congressional Country Club.

post #28 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post

 

 

What is Edel?  I'm am not familiar with what that is.  Thanks for your feedback/help!

Tristan does a good job.

 

Basically, you don't pick the putter head, the putter head picks you -- based on your aim a putter head, weight, loft and neck, etc. are designed for you, and then all other factors are fitted as to shaft, grip, counterbalancing, etc.

post #29 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Tristan does a good job.

 

Basically, you don't pick the putter head, the putter head picks you -- based on your aim a putter head, weight, loft and neck, etc. are designed for you, and then all other factors are fitted as to shaft, grip, counterbalancing, etc.


Sounds interesting.....what about the material that the head is made out of?  Can I get GSS, just like a Scotty?

post #30 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post

Sounds interesting.....what about the material that the head is made out of?  Can I get GSS, just like a Scotty?

 

The steel is just as good. GSS is not imbued with magical qualities. :) It's just one of many variants of steel.

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post


Sounds interesting.....what about the material that the head is made out of?  Can I get GSS, just like a Scotty?

I've had GSS and DSS - nothing magical about it. It is in less supply in putters and thus pricey ... and most importantly, adds nothing to performance.

 

Don't buy into the hype.

 

Are you spending too much time on the Scotty Putter Forum or wrx?

 

Just look away - you have a bunch of addicts in denial. I should know. And then you have the Collectors.

 

 What's better than being able to vary your loft and weight depending on conditions, and having that putter fit you perfectly? 

 

Or varying the weight and having it fit you in every aspect?

 

And having the option of a pixl insert? It is a nice insert, by the way.

 

Drop the "what do the pros play?" Many pros have Edels, but they're not paid to use them, so they don't.

post #32 of 45
And to think we had gone SO LONG without talking about German stainless steel! :-p
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post

Many people have told me to get fitted and get lessons.  I have been reluctant to do either and here's why: I have only been playing golf for less than 9 months.  In that time I have played around 75 rounds of golf.  That's not a lot of golf overall.  My swing and my putting stroke are still evolving as I continue to play and learn.  I continue to improve at this point because I have not played that much or for that long.  When I get to a point where I have truly learned the game and my swing/stroke, I'll then be happy to find a "partner" that can help me continue to improve.

 

I know this thread is about a putter addiction, but I really feel like I need to comment on your statement above.   You say you've only be golfing for 9 months and have played 75 rounds - wow, that's about twice a week, which is more than most of us get to play!    But one thing you're doing is ingraining in swing habits which are almost certainly a collection of adjustments and compromises which come together to help you play a bit.     Every time you swing a club, you're going to make it tougher and tougher to correct and build a better swing which will last you years.   

 

The best time to take lessons is when you're just starting out.  A decent pro can get you on the correct habits from the beginning.    You'll spend the rest of your life struggling to unlearn bad habits and change your swing.

post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post

And to think we had gone SO LONG without talking about German stainless steel! :-p

And I was going to ask what GSS was. So what is DSS (guessing domestic or Dutch)?

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post

 

The best time to take lessons is when you're just starting out.  A decent pro can get you on the correct habits from the beginning.    You'll spend the rest of your life struggling to unlearn bad habits and change your swing.

 

+1

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by dak4n6 View Post

And I was going to ask what GSS was. So what is DSS (guessing domestic or Dutch)?

 

Maybe dog e1_poo.gif?

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