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post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuffluck View Post

i bought it brand new from ebay, but it was not an authorized seller so he didn't have all the parts.  i just got the hosel and the head; i put my own shaft in it (a store did, i know they snapped it on tight because i was there).  adams said they'll give me one for $35.  i've looked at lowes and home depot and cannot find any type of triangular head that would work for this application.

though you guys say it is normal for it to come loose from time to time?  i guess then i NEED to buy it.
I'm not sure if it's normal to come loose, but I figured anything held on by a screw subjected to vibrations could come loose. I don't want to learn the hard way, by seeing my Driver head fly off into a pond.
post #20 of 43

I've never had an adjustable driver do that. If anything it gets a little hard to remove the head from time to time. But as far as my Nike VR_S (not the red crown, last years) once you screw the head on, you can hear and feel it snap and lock in place. I wonder how the guys who installed your shaft was able to ensure it was locked without having the wrench? (Or maybe they had one lying around) You may wanna start by taking it back there.

post #21 of 43

I feel your pain.  Right now I'm not playing to my handicap, mainly because I hardly played for a few months but I'm back in business now.  I've taken a lesson and have a clear idea of what I need to do to develop a more consistent game.

 

Keep it simple, get good extension, focus on staying on plane up and don't overhit.  That would be my advice in a nutshell.

 

Don't despair, effort will be rewarded .........

........

........

eventually.

 

In the meantime enjoy the scenery and the companionship of your fellow sufferers.

post #22 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonTheSavage View Post

I've never had an adjustable driver do that. If anything it gets a little hard to remove the head from time to time. But as far as my Nike VR_S (not the red crown, last years) once you screw the head on, you can hear and feel it snap and lock in place. I wonder how the guys who installed your shaft was able to ensure it was locked without having the wrench? (Or maybe they had one lying around) You may wanna start by taking it back there.


the shop had a tool lying around, and i heard it snap into place.  that was about 2 months ago.  i wonder why the heck it happened then, i hope the whole driver head isn't defective.  maybe i'm swinging too hard b2_tongue.gif

post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuffluck View Post

i've started to come to terms that my golf game is probably going to hover around the "bogey golfer" status for some time--which is fine--but my inconsistency to even shoot bogey is really getting to me.  i.e. last week i was hitting the ball beautifully and missed about 6 putts inside 5 feet.  and yesterday i had 35 putts (which is good for me), with some really good hole outs.  but i lost 8 drives, including one in the water.  wound up shooting 105, with 15 penalty strokes.  granted the wind was awful and at least 3 of the drives i lost to the wind, but still even 5 is too many.  next week i'll probably go out and putt well, drive well, and hit my irons like crap.  that just seems to be how i play week to week.

 

at any rate the lack of consistency makes me angry.  i stop enjoying the beauty of being outside.  i don't thrash clubs around or show a lot of temper (my 56 wedge does see some 20 foot underhanded launches back towards the cart occasionally), but i certainly feel the anger and i can get short with my playing partners.  i'm wondering if golf isn't for me??  this is supposed to be an enjoyable game and i find myself more pissed off during a round than pleased i have the free time and good health to get out and do something like play golf.  is anyone else like me or have been like me??  of course i don't want to shoot a 105 every time, but it's going to happen and when it does i don't want to be ready to sell my clubs as soon as i get home.

I was having similar thoughts after a few really up and down rounds.  What really helped a lot was I went out with a couple of really good friends and we played Wolf for a round and then I went and played another round with my kids as a full scramble.  Just getting the focus off of the score card and taking joy in a great shot or a great hole and not worrying about the handicap or the final outcome was a great reminder of how much fun the game is and how you can get too caught up in the scoring some times.  

post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuffluck View Post


the shop had a tool lying around, and i heard it snap into place.  that was about 2 months ago.  i wonder why the heck it happened then, i hope the whole driver head isn't defective.  maybe i'm swinging too hard b2_tongue.gif

 

I hope I'm wrong, but there is always a chance that the club is not genuine, considering you bought it on ebay "brand new" and it didn't come with the tool.  Why would 't a brand new club not include the bundled tool?

post #25 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post

I hope I'm wrong, but there is always a chance that the club is not genuine, considering you bought it on ebay "brand new" and it didn't come with the tool.  Why would 't a brand new club not include the bundled tool?

I thought that may be possible. The person was not a retailer at all, just a guy selling. It was shrink wrapped and even had a bar code in the same format as the absolutely legitimate heads that come from Adams. It looks very real. Whoever did it, if fake, isn't getting a good return on their investment as good of a copy as it is.

Also, i hit it and an actual Adams on a LM almostexactly the same (my shaft better), so that would make the fake even more impressive. Still, I find it fishy that the hosel came loose.
post #26 of 43

I know how you feel...I've been on vacation from work all last week and return tomorrow.  I was able to get 3 full rounds of golf in.  Yesterday my son and I played a new to us course which was very exciting.  I wasn't expecting to play too well since neither of us even knew the layout of the course.  I actually did OK on the front 9 and the stars must have been aligned because I got par on a par 3, but once I scored an 8 on the 10th hole, my game completely fell apart, every hole after that I could not hit my driver at all, irons were very consistent, stunk with the putter, etc.  I finished with a 109.  I was ready to put my clubs up for sale on Craigslist as soon as I got home.

 

My biggest frustration is that I don't feel I'm improving any.  I used to play a round of golf maybe once a month/every 6 weeks in the summer and would score in the low 100's.  I've been playing at least once per week, sometimes twice for the last 3 months, including range time and although I do get into the mid 90's a few times, it's a real struggle to break 100 consistently.

post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crusher47 View Post

I know how you feel...I've been on vacation from work all last week and return tomorrow.  I was able to get 3 full rounds of golf in.  Yesterday my son and I played a new to us course which was very exciting.  I wasn't expecting to play too well since neither of us even knew the layout of the course.  I actually did OK on the front 9 and the stars must have been aligned because I got par on a par 3, but once I scored an 8 on the 10th hole, my game completely fell apart, every hole after that I could not hit my driver at all, irons were very consistent, stunk with the putter, etc.  I finished with a 109.  I was ready to put my clubs up for sale on Craigslist as soon as I got home.

 

My biggest frustration is that I don't feel I'm improving any.  I used to play a round of golf maybe once a month/every 6 weeks in the summer and would score in the low 100's.  I've been playing at least once per week, sometimes twice for the last 3 months, including range time and although I do get into the mid 90's a few times, it's a real struggle to break 100 consistently.

 

This is quite a common phenomenon when playing an unfamiliar course.  I've done the same a few times, and it's even more humbling when you have the impression that you have made it over the hump from being a bogey golfer to progressing toward an "elite" in single digits.  I played at the Breckenridge Golf Club in Breckenridge CO back in the early 90's.  I was playing to a 10 on my home course, and about 12 away from home, then shot a 103 on that Jack Nicklaus layout.  Sort of like Rory, was not in a "good places mentally" after that round - in fact I was steaming. In reality, it was one of the tougher courses I'd played to that time in my golfing life, and it was a wake up call.  It was also long before such valuable aids as lasers and GPS, so it was not difficult to find yourself in a bad place after thinking you had hit a safe shot.  

 

However, I did take away from that experience the realization that even though I had made good strides with my game, on any given day it can all go to hell.  A couple of years later, still hovering around a 9 or 10 handicap, I shot a 104 on my home course in the first round of the 72 hole Club Championship.  While I wasn't the happiest player in the field, I toughed it out, and even endured the inevitable razzing in the clubhouse afterward.  The next day I shot 88, then the second weekend both rounds were in the 70's.  Golf is a fickle mistress, and the sooner you realize that the better you will be able to deal with those days when it all comes crashing down. g1_wacko.gif

post #28 of 43

WTF?  FourPutt posted a semi-bash on the OP, then it looks as if a mod pasted in 10 posts from a completely different thread.  Maybe I should have another cup of coffee and come back again.

 

As to the OP:  golf is freaking hard.  Even when you get down to low single-digits, it doesn't get easier.  In fact, it just gets harder, because the margins get smaller.

post #29 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crusher47 View Post

I know how you feel...I've been on vacation from work all last week and return tomorrow.  I was able to get 3 full rounds of golf in.  Yesterday my son and I played a new to us course which was very exciting.  I wasn't expecting to play too well since neither of us even knew the layout of the course.  I actually did OK on the front 9 and the stars must have been aligned because I got par on a par 3, but once I scored an 8 on the 10th hole, my game completely fell apart, every hole after that I could not hit my driver at all, irons were very consistent, stunk with the putter, etc.  I finished with a 109.  I was ready to put my clubs up for sale on Craigslist as soon as I got home.

 

My biggest frustration is that I don't feel I'm improving any.  I used to play a round of golf maybe once a month/every 6 weeks in the summer and would score in the low 100's.  I've been playing at least once per week, sometimes twice for the last 3 months, including range time and although I do get into the mid 90's a few times, it's a real struggle to break 100 consistently.

really i was here with you before (and even there on saturday with my 105).  but i remember consistently being in the 100s.  i'm not sure what got me into the 90s more consistently, but i think it was a better short game.  i actually consider my short game pretty good, as i don't hit many GIR so i have to rely on it.  IMO if you can chip once and putt twice to get in the hole, you have a decent short game.  unless you are like me on saturday and losing tee shots resulting in 2 stroke penalties, if you can hit a tee shot and an iron within 50 yards of the green, having a 3-stroke short game thereafter will get you to bogey golf.  it's always the penalty shots and lip-outs that kill me, either separately or as a combination. 

 

and for the record i guess i don't know what the exact definition of bogey golf is, because even on the courses i play, 18 strokes over par is sometimes a 15 handicap because of ratings/slopes.  and i think 15 is not exactly bogey golf, even if i actually bogeyed all the holes.  so when i say bogey golf, i mean literally ignoring the handicap system and shooting a bogey average on all 18 holes (18 over par).

 

and i'll add that i am okay with double bogey, as i know i will par somewhere and negate that double to net bogey on both.  it's when i get a triple or worse where i can mentally feel frustration and stress, as i know i'm at least one stroke behind my (ideal) bogey finish.  i just need to manage that stress a little better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by k-troop View Post

WTF?  FourPutt posted a semi-bash on the OP, then it looks as if a mod pasted in 10 posts from a completely different thread.  Maybe I should have another cup of coffee and come back again.

 

As to the OP:  golf is freaking hard.  Even when you get down to low single-digits, it doesn't get easier.  In fact, it just gets harder, because the margins get smaller.

i kind of changed the subject when i asked people if it was normal for hosels to separate from club heads.  and actually to that point, i went to a golfsmith last night to have them tighten the head.  it was just before closing and i was the only one there.  before i left i asked the guy if he could order me a replacement tool, and he just gave me the one in the store.  he also gave me the bag which had the extra weights in there also.  it was awesome!

 

also i was thinking the "click" noise when tightening meant you locked it in place, but it's just a torque wrench clicking.  that just means there is a certain amount of pressure the torque wrench allows and no more, and the screw isn't locking in place at all, just going to a certain tightness level.  with that in mind, without some locktite on the hosel screw, it seems perfectly reasonable the screw could come loose, even if it is a bit odd.

post #30 of 43

This is why I love the game of golf.  One day you can play lights out and shoot the best round of your life.  Then the very next day on the very same course, you can in turn shoot the worst round of your life.  It's going to happen.  I have had it happen several times.  It's the way this game goes.  When I was younger and just getting into golf, I used to get really pissed at myself, the course, the club, etc.  I have learned, through a lot of practice and patience, that it only hurts my game and it can also affect the people playing with me.  Take it all with a grain of salt and have fun.  After all, that is why we play, right??????  Just my opinion.....

post #31 of 43
About the familiarity thing. It's part of it for sure, getting rattled because you make dumb plays not knowing well enough where danger lurks. But there are exceptions. I had a good day (for me) playing Spyglass the first and only time. Maybe I was being uncharacteristically cautious at the time, all those trees and narrow fairways. Couple of years later I played another course in the area (first time) that was much more forgiving and botched just about everything but the last few holes.

What a game ....
post #32 of 43

I feel the same way. I want to improve my game so freakin' badly and I know I am so damn close to becoming a consistent 90s golfer but I just can't break through the wall. A few weeks ago I shot 92 and my best score since then has been a 103. My worst was cloes to 120. It's pathetic, frustrating and it blows my mind. One thing I have done to help me not feel so bad is to play against my handicap par. I think that is one of my favorite things to do because it gives me a little lee way so I don't feel so bad but I still get frustrated with myself when I give away a stroke to my HC par. You should try it and see how it makes you feel. I like to score myself with what I shot on each hole but versus HC par, I just use the ole +1 +2 +3 method to know where I am versus it.

 

The way we care about this game, eventually, we just have to improve with practice, knowledge and time on the course. It's bound to happen.

post #33 of 43

Golf is hard, requires lots of practice. When I started again in spring 2012 after many years away it was brutal. My parents invited me and I hit the course after not swinging a club in more than a decade. Pretty sure I picked it up on every hole. I spent a lot of time on the range and putting greens. I went from nothing to several hours a week. Some days I did nothing but putt towards a few tees I pushed into the the ground for several hours. It was monotonous and at times not very interesting. I went backwards through my bag until I found the longest club I could hit with a little consistency and I played that from the tee with the idea that keeping the ball in play would keep me in the game. I did that for several months until I was certain I could move to something longer without blowing up my round. Didn't matter how long the hole was I stuck to using the 4 iron and though I wasn't hitting it up with the guys I played with my scores started to improve.

 

Entire days were spent playing the shortest par 3 courses I could find to work on the short game. By mid summer it was I was frequently breaking 90. By the end of summer it was rare to exceed 90. I've haven't put up anything close to 90 in months. Point being there is no reward with out putting in the time. No pain, no gain and trying to run before I could walk would have been a recipe for the game being more frustrating than necessary. Work hard and play smart and you will be rewarded with lower scores. I played myself down to a 12 after not even being able to finish a hole in less than 10 strokes in about 7 months. But I worked my ass off. My goal is to get down into single digits within a few months of 04/01/2013. That's when our scores start to count again, were in offseason here now. I haven't lost sight of the goal no matter how frustrating and tedius the practice can be. I rolled more than 200 putts towards a hole 4 feet away earlier today in an attempt to get a handle on what was a weak point for me last summer. By the end of the session I was hitting far more than I missed, maybe 8 out of 10 through 50 attempts. I intend to do that every day this week. A big part of it being gaining the confidence it takes to stand over that putt with conviction. Again no pain, no gain. The quality of my golf, everything from how much I enjoy it to how well I play is relative to how smart I practice.

post #34 of 43

We all have been in those shoes... It still drives me nuts when I don't play my handicap one day but like they said earlier you have to take it with a grain of salt. Personally when I hav that bad round, I try to look back afterwards and remember how it felt to hit those few perfect crisp shots that do exactly like you wanted and focus on the positives rather than the negatives. Also beer helps haha my score on the front determines my empties at the end of the round! 🍻 Golf is like fishing, a horrible day at either is better than the best day at work!... Unless you're a pro golfer ha

post #35 of 43

Some suggestions for putting consistency improvement that worked for me (putting is the best part of my game):

 

1.  Read "Unconcious Putting" by Dr. Bob Rotella

 

2.  Read the Stan Utley putting book for a quick fix - his mental trick of shooting a basketball is really effective in the short term.

 

3.  Read The Dave Pelz Putting Bible and do the nightly jar/yardstick exercises.  After about four months you'll be as good inside 5 feet as a tour pro (as Pelz says, and its true).

 

I would highly suggest an Edel (or equivilent) putter fitting.  A putter you aim well and of the proper length and naturally comfortable weight is a huge boost.

post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuffluck View Postat any rate the lack of consistency makes me angry.  i stop enjoying the beauty of being outside.  i don't thrash clubs around or show a lot of temper (my 56 wedge does see some 20 foot underhanded launches back towards the cart occasionally), but i certainly feel the anger and i can get short with my playing partners.  i'm wondering if golf isn't for me??  this is supposed to be an enjoyable game and i find myself more pissed off during a round than pleased i have the free time and good health to get out and do something like play golf.  is anyone else like me or have been like me??  of course i don't want to shoot a 105 every time, but it's going to happen and when it does i don't want to be ready to sell my clubs as soon as i get home.

 

The part of your post that encourages me is the fact that you said, "the lack of consistency makes me angry." This shows that you take pride in doing things well. I have been golfing more than 50 years and I always wanted to be consistent at work, at play, or in my personal relationships. Here is my advice for whatever it is worth...

 

To be consistent in golf means that you need to 1) take lessons and develop your swing; 2) find time to practice the lessons; and, 3) develop a mental approach to the game to fit your personality.

 

1. When I was young I read articles by Al Geiberger and Jack Nicklaus' book, "Golf My Way." I am 6'3" tall and Mr. Geiberger is 6'2". By reading Geiberger's articles I was able to understand the basic concepts about the swing plane and arc of a tall man and develop a very tempo conscious swing. By reading Nicklaus' book I tried to emulate the greatest golfer of his era. But, not until I invested in going to a Golf Digest school at age 25 and took a week of lessons did everything come into focus.  I guess what I am saying is, at least try to understand what goes into a golf swing. Taking lessons from a pro would be my first choice, but at least, read and assimilate the lessons into your swing. (Note: I have not taken formal lessons since the golf digest school, but continue to utilize what I learned even today.)

 

2. With golf, it is not enough to understand a golf swing. What your mind comprehends, your body does not follow. So, you need to train your muscles to perform the moves of a swing, in the same way that a dancer learns choreography for a dance routine. That means practice is integral to getting your muscles to move in the desired motions. Years ago I read that it takes about 10,000 reps before a swing change becomes totally natural, but that is a very debatable topic. I coached high school golf for a number of years and I tried to have my golfers understand that it is more important to practice wisely, rather than worry how long you will be at the range. Different drills are essential to good practice. Pick out one part of your swing to practice (shoulder turn, take away, weight shift, follow through, etc.), and concentrate on that until you feel comfortable. Then try to take it to the course. The big drawback here is that practice is time consuming and takes away your time from the course. But, I tell you, time at the range enhances the on-course experience. If you want to be consistent you do need to practice.

 

3. Developing a mental approach is critical to how much pleasure you get from the game. I highly recommend that you read "Golf is Not a Game of Perfect" by Dr. Bob Rotella. I refer to myself as a "Happy 9." In other words, I am a single digit handicapper who enjoys playing recreationally. I subscribe to Dr. Rotella's rule: "I will refuse to allow anything that happens on the golf course today to bother me or upset me. I will accept bad breaks and mistakes and be tough in adversity. I am going to be in a good mood and a great state of mind for the entire round today. I'll enjoy playing."  Every golfer needs to find their mental approach to this great game, so that they can consistently get as much pleasure from their 18 holes (and to maintain their sanity).

 

Here is an example of how powerful my mental approach statement can be... Last year I was playing my normal Monday morning game with my friend Jim, and had just bought some yellow Srixon balls. I am a 9 handicap, and I pride myself on my consistency, but this day I started with 4 bogeys and 4 double-bogeys. I can't remember the last time I was 12 over after 8 holes, but I remembered Dr. Rotella's rule: "I will refuse to allow anything that happens on the golf course today to bother me or upset me...", so I changed back to my Pro V1 white ball, and told Jim it was the yellow ball's fault. Well then next ten holes I shot even par with an eagle, a birdie and 5 pars. When I got home I told my wife I had a present for her and gave her a brand new box of 11 yellow balls and one that was slightly used. I turned a potentially disasterous day on the course into a memorable moment in time.

 

Is one point more important than the other? Many a hacker has more pleasure on a golf course than anyone I know, because they know their limitations (and carry a six pack). They don't have a very good swing, and don't practice at all. But, they are happy.

 

Personally, I would consider that non-acceptable in my world, because I take the game more seriously, and could not have pleasure consistently shooting 100+.I don't take lessons, and occasionally practice to try and maintain my skill level. I love the game, and I am happy (without the six pack).

 

Likewise, scratch golfers cannot accept my philosophy of golf, because their level of pleasure is measured by how low they can go, every single time they play. Shooting an 80 would be a disaster. They, in all likelihood, still take lessons and practice whenever they can to improve their swing. They, too, are happy.

 

Hey tuffluck, hang in there. You had a bad day on the course. You'll get 'em the next time.

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