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What is your swing speed and carry? - Page 7

post #109 of 167

Re: What is your swing speed and carry?

Originally Posted by -BAMA- View Post
swing speed used to be 104 average and up to 230 yards....

ive since slowed my swing down to between 85-90 mph... i actually hit the ball longer and straighter.. i average 250-260 yards with a slight draw and about right at 250 when i hit them straight.

i hit my old hawkeye way better than my new cleveland hibore xl or my dad's g10. i wish they still made hawkeyes exactly the way they used to, i cant seem to get used to these big coffee can drivers i dont know why....
A lot of people get more distance from smaller heads, as they have a ton less drag, which can make swing speeds up to 5 miles per hour higher.
post #110 of 167

Re: What is your swing speed and carry?

Stow- you also give up the forgiveness factor, which for most, is far more important than SS


My slowest is 95 MPH, thats with the ironsf/woods, but the driver gets up to 110 ish if i work hard at it, but i load pretty agressivly, every once in a while ill rip at one and it makes my old V2 feel like mush.
post #111 of 167

Re: What is your swing speed and carry?

Originally Posted by st0wgolf08 View Post
A lot of people get more distance from smaller heads, as they have a ton less drag, which can make swing speeds up to 5 miles per hour higher.
That's a misperception. No impact. Otherwise pros would hit with smaller heads because they don't always need the forgiveness of the larger club face.

Edit: I stand corrected.

"Smaller can be 1 to 1.5 mph faster aerodynamically," explained Jeff Colton, Callaway's senior VP of research and development. "That equates to 2 to 3 mph more ball speed.

http://www.golfdigest.com/golfworld/...0081003johnson.
post #112 of 167

Re: What is your swing speed and carry?

Anyone have a good site explaining isometrics and possible workouts associated with it?
post #113 of 167

Re: What is your swing speed and carry?

i'm not sure what it is now - i have an *entirely* different swing from the last time i had my speed clocked - but a year ago, i was swinging 98-100 mph and carrying about 250 with a driver. i'm inclined to say i've upped it just a little bit since my carry now is closer to 260-265, but that might also be the result of my switching drivers (old driver was a 10 degree cobra, my current one is a 9 degree big bertha).
post #114 of 167

Re: What is your swing speed and carry?

My normal SS is 85-92 and I can carry it about 230-250 depends if I hit it square or not...
if I really swing for the fences I can get 103 but it is just a spray and prey... LOL
post #115 of 167

Re: What is your swing speed and carry?

was on a launch monitor today SS right around 98 with a nice smooth swing carrying about 235-240ish, but my spin is awful :(
post #116 of 167

Hit 375 yesterday with a range ball. Was surprised. If you play with a 47 1/2" XXX stiff quality shaft and only 6 degrees of loft you can keep your ball spin down and the ball will naturally fly faster and farther. My swing speed on SSRadar is only 125mph, sometimes a little faster. But if you hit up on the ball by a few degrees unlike most who are trained with a negative attack angle it can make a big difference. I see now how Rory at his size can hit over 350 on occasion, its the quality of the strike,the angle and the kind of club you use that can aid you imo. Most marry swing speed to distance but I am sure that someone with good rollout could hit 400 with only 127-28 mph on SSRadar and a 5 degree lofted 48" HOF shaft. The techno Trackman guys probably won't believe me but I paced off 3 of those yesterday after they cleared the range fence. Now a pro level touring ball would add to that. Remember the guys on the Tour are playing with brand new top level balls, some are designed for rollout and some are designed better for big high flight.

post #117 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post
 

Hit 375 yesterday with a range ball. Was surprised. If you play with a 47 1/2" XXX stiff quality shaft and only 6 degrees of loft you can keep your ball spin down and the ball will naturally fly faster and farther. My swing speed on SSRadar is only 125mph, sometimes a little faster. But if you hit up on the ball by a few degrees unlike most who are trained with a negative attack angle it can make a big difference. I see now how Rory at his size can hit over 350 on occasion, its the quality of the strike,the angle and the kind of club you use that can aid you imo. Most marry swing speed to distance but I am sure that someone with good rollout could hit 400 with only 127-28 mph on SSRadar and a 5 degree lofted 48" HOF shaft. The techno Trackman guys probably won't believe me but I paced off 3 of those yesterday after they cleared the range fence. Now a pro level touring ball would add to that. Remember the guys on the Tour are playing with brand new top level balls, some are designed for rollout and some are designed better for big high flight.

:blink: That must have rolled a good 100 yards....

post #118 of 167

I've been getting more distance lately... working on incorporating some wrist hinge.    Carry with a nicely struck driver is now around 240-245.      Swing speed is still fairly slow - play regular flex

post #119 of 167

cute comment but the carry on those drives was 330-335 . What I am learning is that a key ingredient to distance is leverage angle at impact. Most clubheads slow in speed by 20% upon contact with the ball in the average golfer. Training and effort is made to reduce deceleration in clubhead by long drivers who are well aware of this. This is where strength training comes into play. Greater force applied thru the impact zone means maybe 15% reduction in deceleration, believe it or don't believe it. That spells 30 yards more minimum right there and it has yet to be factored by a Trackman. Also Trackman is deficient in that for many clubheads it does not measure actual speed accurately as it measures speed off the heel of the head. A good friend who never swings more than 113-114 on Trackman hits 330 easily on a regular basis. He is athletic, 6'1" 225lbs and knows how to leverage his swing at impact. Speed is only one of the correlates to distance, sorry.

post #120 of 167
98-102 swing speed. 9.5 degrees 60 gram stiff stock shaft (adila) spin about 2800-3200 RPMs launch angle is 11+\- approx.

Now: same swing speed, new SLDR driver, 57 gram stock shaft, stiff, spin is 2200-2350 RPMs, loft is 11.5 ( on a 10.5 head) launch angle is <14 degrees, easily 8-16 yards further. If you think of it, that is whole club closer to a par four green. Now I am hitting 8 rather than a 7 iron.
post #121 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post

cute comment but the carry on those drives was 330-335 . What I am learning is that a key ingredient to distance is leverage angle at impact. Most clubheads slow in speed by 20% upon contact with the ball in the average golfer. Training and effort is made to reduce deceleration in clubhead by long drivers who are well aware of this. This is where strength training comes into play. Greater force applied thru the impact zone means maybe 15% reduction in deceleration, believe it or don't believe it. That spells 30 yards more minimum right there and it has yet to be factored by a Trackman. Also Trackman is deficient in that for many clubheads it does not measure actual speed accurately as it measures speed off the heel of the head. A good friend who never swings more than 113-114 on Trackman hits 330 easily on a regular basis. He is athletic, 6'1" 225lbs and knows how to leverage his swing at impact. Speed is only one of the correlates to distance, sorry.
The reason Trackman doesn't factor in the slowing of the club head is because it doesn't really affect the distance the ball goes. When the ball is only on the club face for .0004 seconds (that's four ten-thousandths of a second, or 4/10ths of a millisecond), you will not be able to impart more force except by having a greater swing speed or greater clubhead mass (while retaining the same swing speed). However, speed increases are much more efficient since energy is exponentially proportional to speed, and only has a linear relationship to mass. Anyways, in those .0004 seconds you will not be able to transmit more energy to the ball just because your club slows down less. It's the velocity of the clubhead going into impact that matters, not the speed after impact. Any resistance to deceleration you could provide would be much too late to have an effect: it takes longer than than .0004 seconds for you to even register that you hit the ball (most people have a reaction time between .15 and .25 seconds). So even if you tried to provide more torque to specifically resist the deceleration at impact, you would be better off just applying that energy to swing faster in general.

It's likely that the 15% decrease in speed is due to a heavier clubhead, which would give the club more momentum ( or it could also be traveling faster). When the club has more mass (or travels faster) it will have a greater momentum. It's kind of like how a Prius hitting a concrete barrier slows down a lot more than a semi that hits the same concrete barrier. Similarly, a semi hitting the barrier at 5 mph will slow down a lot more (speaking in percentages) than a semi that hits a concrete barrier at 50 mph.

Interestingly enough, a case could be made that says the 20% decrease is more efficient! since it transfers more of its energy to the ball instead of letting the club retain the energy.

Anyways, just a bit of food for thought in that the speed at impact is much more important than the speed after. To hit it 300 yards, I'd want to get more solid contact and clubhead speed instead of worrying about trying to reduce the deceleration of my club when it hits the ball. Then again, who legitimately NEEDS to hit the ball 300 yards to play well on their local course? (Hint: the answer is nobody when the average PGA driving distance is 287 yards)
post #122 of 167

but mass is not just the mass of the clubhead, its the mass and leverage of the size and strength of the person who is the extension of that clubhead via the shaft thru the hands and forearms and into the torso and legs. There is no other commonsense explanation for why one would rather be hit by a punch thrown by Ray Leonard or  one by George Foreman assuming they are of equal speed and distance. Its why longdrivers train in gyms as well as on ranges.

Regarding the other poster doubting that 125mph can yield a 375 yard drive just look at Bubba Watson who averrages 122-125 and will regularly bomb out to 360-370. This is with a 45" driver at most. You give him a long drive 48" club and you can add 30 yards to that once he gets used to swinging it. Finally for those who disparage distances beyond 300 I would say the game has obviously changed and is a power game today. Anyone able to hit very   long drives with reasonable consistency even if he misses fairways is at a great advantage to others playing 50-75 yards behind him. It does not follow that because a golfer can hit 350 he must have a poor short game or scoring record. Nicklaus dominated because he was the very long in his prime which set up the rest of his game. Watson is by far the best shotmaker on the tour today imo.     

post #123 of 167

I hit some few shots at local golfsmith.  Mine is about 87-92 and my carry is as usual not great, ~210-230.  I' say my big issue is flexibility and outside in swing creates too much side spin and being face to slice.  

post #124 of 167
With a boxer, they can throw their entire mass behind the punch quite literally: they move their body into it. In golf, while the torque you apply does have some effect upon the momentum of the clubhead, it is less effective than just increasing your clubhead speed.

As to driving distance, it certainly is an advantage to bomb it long down the middle. While it is an advantage, it's not one that everyone can have and it's not one that is necessary to compete at the highest level. That's all I was trying to say there, and I apologize if I came off as though a long drive is a disadvantage. I just don't personally see drivin distance to be as important as accuracy so long as you hi it far enough for the tees you play.
post #125 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pretzel View Post

With a boxer, they can throw their entire mass behind the punch quite literally: they move their body into it. In golf, while the torque you apply does have some effect upon the momentum of the clubhead, it is less effective than just increasing your clubhead speed.

As to driving distance, it certainly is an advantage to bomb it long down the middle. While it is an advantage, it's not one that everyone can have and it's not one that is necessary to compete at the highest level. That's all I was trying to say there, and I apologize if I came off as though a long drive is a disadvantage. I just don't personally see drivin distance to be as important as accuracy so long as you hi it far enough for the tees you play.

 

Actually its opposite.  If you look at the top 12 longest drivers of the ball last year. 11 out of the 12 golfers had a higher GIR % than the PGA Tour Average. 

 

Basically closer to the hole offsets the penalties for being out of position. Odds play in favor to those who can hit it farther. 

post #126 of 167

I wish I knew what my ss and average carry was. I would assume I'm somewhere around 100ish and about 240 ish carry? I mean, on good days I can really poke them out there, but that's not average is it...

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