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Can someone please explain the Aimpoint putting technique? - Page 3

post #37 of 64

Here is the deal... I mainly wanted to take Aimpoint for a few reasons...

 

1.) I was playing golf here in Socal a little over a year ago - maybe 1.5yrs ago?  I was a single and got matched up with a few other guys.  One guy was using his Aimpoint chart and getting reads on putts, and no kidding - draining a lot of putts.  I was pretty impressed with how this guy was able to make what I considered difficult putts - at lengths that were beyond the typical make range of an amateur player.  And more importantly, his misses were all within reasonable range tap-in to shorty par save range.  He didn't have a 3 putt, and easily his putting was the best part of his game.

 

So I did research after that round, looking on-line to see what I could find about Aimpoint.  And I contacted the local Aimpoint Instructor at the time in San Diego (who has since left Aimpoint)... And got pricing.  When I received the pricing, I too was skeptical, and didn't think it was worth spending the money.  So I passed. 

 

2.) I attended the Callaway Ely Performance center in Carlsbad, CA last Summer.  And during the Ely visit, we met with the guys in the Odyssey putting lab, where they have a SAM, and were discussing the effects of being aimed properly, and the capture speed of a putt.  All of this talk about being aimed properly - and its effects on how far offline your putt could be based on the length, really made me more aware of the 'science' behind putting.

 

Here is a chart that was hanging inside the Odyssey lab for example (sorry it is a little blurry - but it was taken with my iPhone).

 

 

 

3.) Being a regular on this site, and talking to guys about Aimpoint, made me more and more interested.  So when Erik, Dave and Mike organized an Aimpoint clinic last Summer, I knew I had to take advantage of it.  First, to get a chance to meet Erik and Dave (I'd already met Mike)... But also, to finally get a chance to learn Aimpoint.

 

The thing I like the most about Aimpoint, similar to what Golfingdad mentioned in his post... Is that it helps my confidence level.  I get my Aimpoint read, and simply look the number up in the chart.  Once I have the number, it helps me as I'm confident that the number is pretty damn accurate.  Especially on long putts - I know it is going to give me a solid chance at a two putt (possibly making the putt) - as long as I get the putt rolling at the proper speed.

 

But the other thing that is really cool about Aimpoint... Is that you can really learn how to hit those testy 5ft severe breaking putts.  Ones that you only see Pros make... Watch this homemade video for instance... This is a 4% slope - and using Aimpoint to get the break.  Once you get the break, it is just knowing how hard to hit the putt - which is still instinctive - but again, takes at least the guesstimate piece out of the equation.

 

post #38 of 64

I haven't taken an Aimpoint course, but I did work with David Orr who gave me the nuts and bolts of Aimpoint but I did not get the charts etc.  The biggest thing he taught me was how to read the green, find the fall line, etc.  I played to a low HC for 20 years and never really knew how to read a green correctly.  I was the "looks like it breaks left about a cup and a half" with really no clue why or exactly if it was breaking left or right.  Now I can find the fall line so I know which way the putt is going 99.9% of the time.  David gave me some basics on slope and speed etc and I have a good idea of the amount of break without using the charts.  I am sure I am not 100% accurate as the chart would be, but I can say "okay I am at 4:00 o'clock, uphill, it breaks right to left, speed of green is about 9, distance is about 18 feet, slope is about 2%, this putt should break 14" etc."

 

It has helped me tremendously just by knowing for sure which way the putt will break.

post #39 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher View Post

Deryck, I don't doubt your word, but can you quantify how it was worth it?  Did you see a reduction in strokes and was it easy to learn and use?  I am considering the 8 hour drive out to Erie at some point this year if I can come up with the money for the trip, this being one of the big reasons for it.


Your concerns are good ones.  I wasn't as skeptical as others because I naturally love to soak in new tips that golf has to offer; especially from people I trust.  Based on what I have read on this forum over the years, I know Erik or Dave wouldn't endorse something that wasn't legit.  So on that alone, I went with it without hesitation.  I live in Toronto so the logistics was all that I needed to work out (I was lucky to pass through Erie on a business trip which worked out perfectly).

 

Aimpoint itself, IMO, presents you with a mathematical way of putting.  Many people say they putt based on what they feel, see, etc and use that to give them the break of the putt.  However, there are instances where what you see and or feel is hard to trust.  Aimpoint will help you to confirm exactly what is going to happen with the putt.  It takes the "guessing" out of it.  Usually, on putts that don't reveal much (putt looks flat but breaks for example), is where Aimpoint will benefit you the most.  My putting between 5-10 feet is where I excelled the most after aimpoint because putts this distance are usually ones that have subtle countours that can cause you to miss the put in a puzzled fashion... Also, those putts are usually the ones that I need to save par or make birdie with...having a more confident read with aimpoint ingrains confidence.

 

As you practice it, it will become almost a second nature thing and you'll be surprised how fast you can read the putt using the Aimpoint method.  For the majority of last summer, I used the Aimpoint book a lot to help me with the putts.  Now, I don't even need to pull it out anymore except for a few occasions. 

 

After you take the clinic, you HAVE to be committed to practicing the aimpoint method to hammer it home in your mind.

post #40 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deryck Griffith View Post


Your concerns are good ones.  I wasn't as skeptical as others because I naturally love to soak in new tips that golf has to offer; especially from people I trust.  Based on what I have read on this forum over the years, I know Erik or Dave wouldn't endorse something that wasn't legit.  So on that alone, I went with it without hesitation.  I live in Toronto so the logistics was all that I needed to work out (I was lucky to pass through Erie on a business trip which worked out perfectly).

 

Aimpoint itself, IMO, presents you with a mathematical way of putting.  Many people say they putt based on what they feel, see, etc and use that to give them the break of the putt.  However, there are instances where what you see and or feel is hard to trust.  Aimpoint will help you to confirm exactly what is going to happen with the putt.  It takes the "guessing" out of it.  Usually, on putts that don't reveal much (putt looks flat but breaks for example), is where Aimpoint will benefit you the most.  My putting between 5-10 feet is where I excelled the most after aimpoint because putts this distance are usually ones that have subtle countours that can cause you to miss the put in a puzzled fashion... Also, those putts are usually the ones that I need to save par or make birdie with...having a more confident read with aimpoint ingrains confidence.

 

As you practice it, it will become almost a second nature thing and you'll be surprised how fast you can read the putt using the Aimpoint method.  For the majority of last summer, I used the Aimpoint book a lot to help me with the putts.  Now, I don't even need to pull it out anymore except for a few occasions. 

 

After you take the clinic, you HAVE to be committed to practicing the aimpoint method to hammer it home in your mind.

That is great to hear, thanks for letting me know.

post #41 of 64

Ha, the Aimpoint conspiracy. Below my experience and pointers to a lengthy thread.

 

The concept is really simple, but one needs a proper introduction and the charts or the app. Dont buy a new putter, go to an Aimpoint class.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollister View Post

Being on vacation I stumbled upon an AimPoint instructor and convinced him to give me the fundamentals lesson. That was pure luck here in Europe currently.

 

Woah, putting balls that close (in)to a hole I would otherwise expect me to have another 1-2 feet put left. Wished he did photos of me grinning big time.

 

I never thought that "reading" green with my feet could be that easy. I am thrilled to go practicing!

 

The downside of my private lesson - he had no charts or the student workbook mentioned here for me. So I have to wait at least for the end of the month to get the AimCharts.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollister View Post

The practice greens are way slower at my place, too. Found it hard to estimate the Stimp speed on the course so far.

 

Still got no AimCharts, used the App the first time yesterday. Wrong pace on the first two holes (thanks to slow practice greens at 8, course at 10 - and a little lack of trust/commitment). Three one-putts on the next three holes - twice from 20 feet, once from 15 feet. Hmm, I think I like AimPoint even more after yesterday. The App is a little fiddly, though, but should have a higher accuracy (self-assurance).

 

...

post #42 of 64

I took the course and it is an awesome system.  It improved my reads by quite a bit and like others have said confidence is high.  $200 is not a lot in the golf world, the juice is worth the squeeze.  

post #43 of 64

I dropped 4 putts per round last year.  I took the course in April and was averaging a little under 35 putts per round before I took the course.  By July, I was averaging ~31 per round.  With AimPoint, you may get the speed wrong and under hit or go by the hole, but you rarely get the amount of break wrong.  Three putts are rare.

 

My friend would tell the other folks playing with us to watch how much break I would play and how close I would get on hard putts. You don't always make 20 footers, but if you get real close, it gives you a lot of confidence.

 

I was playing with a couple of college kids in August.  They watched me putt and asked about my technique.  I explained it.  Later on, one of them had this nasty downhill putt for birdie on a par 4.  He asked me to tell him how much break.  I told him.  He sunk the putt.  

 

What AimPoint does is take the guessing and myth of putting out.  You know how much break there is.  You don't need to know where Ray's Creek is or how far you are from the mountains.  Sinking the putt is then just a matter of getting the speed right.  When I miss, it is usually because of the speed and not playing the wrong amount of break.

post #44 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post

I was playing with a couple of college kids in August.  They watched me putt and asked about my technique.  I explained it.  Later on, one of them had this nasty downhill putt for birdie on a par 4.  He asked me to tell him how much break.  I told him.  He sunk the putt.

 

I was playing in a pro-am with some people. The danger is that people don't always control their speed very well, but this one guy did so I "took a chance" and gave him a read on one hole. He makes it. I read the next one. He made it.

 

I read the next one from the tee of a par three. Got to the green, confirmed that we'd gotten our inputs correct, and he makes THAT one.

 

At this point the other guys in the group are asking me to "get out that magic black book again!"

 

:)

 

The guy made his first five putts, none shorter than 12 feet and the longest at 25, on the first five reads I gave him.

post #45 of 64

If you know anything about the LPGA, you've probably heard of Stacy Lewis...She uses Aimpoint.

 

post #46 of 64
Quote:
I ignore all those rules of if it's breaking towards or away from something, I just go by what gravity says.

 

Great quote by Stacy Lewis in the video that Beach posted.

post #47 of 64

Time and time again the laws of physics are always proven to prevail over the laws of governments, mindsets of people, mythology, and folklore.    With a winning record of something like 100 Billion to Zero, you'd think at some point people would stop thinking physics is the underdog in this contest, wouldn't you?

post #48 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post

Time and time again the laws of physics are always proven to prevail over the laws of governments, mindsets of people, mythology, and folklore.    With a winning record of something like 100 Billion to Zero, you'd think at some point people would stop thinking physics is the underdog in this contest, wouldn't you?

Clam, are you using Aimpoint?  Just curious, as I know you're an Edel guy now... And most go hand and hand.  

 

If you're not using Aimpoint... Go to the Socal Golfers group and look into the Aimpoint clinic Erik and Mike are going to do in early April.  And while I'm on that topic... Join us on the 7th!

post #49 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post

Time and time again the laws of physics are always proven to prevail over the laws of governments, mindsets of people, mythology, and folklore.    With a winning record of something like 100 Billion to Zero, you'd think at some point people would stop thinking physics is the underdog in this contest, wouldn't you?

Couldn't agree more. And if your happy to accept that you cant determine whether your putt is a 2.5 degree or 4 degree and your stimp can vary between holes etc etc then Physics just becomes Physicsy. I'm not invoking the old garbage in garbage out thing cause that's way to blunt and in accurate. But you get my point?

post #50 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by logman View Post

Couldn't agree more. And if your happy to accept that you cant determine whether your putt is a 2.5 degree or 4 degree and your stimp can vary between holes etc etc then Physics just becomes Physicsy. I'm not invoking the old garbage in garbage out thing cause that's way to blunt and in accurate. But you get my point?

 

The degree of slope, the length of putt, the speed of the green might be guesses, but you're guessing them when you're reading a putt "normally" and then you're also guessing at the physics as well! I know I'd prefer to be doing the least amount of guessing I can.

post #51 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by logman View Post

Couldn't agree more. And if your happy to accept that you cant determine whether your putt is a 2.5 degree or 4 degree and your stimp can vary between holes etc etc then Physics just becomes Physicsy. I'm not invoking the old garbage in garbage out thing cause that's way to blunt and in accurate. But you get my point?

Have you ever tried? I've got a calibrated digital level, and have frequently tested my slope-reading abilities. If I didn't think know it was helping, I wouldn't bother.

EDIT: On second though, why am I even responding to someone who messes up "to" and "too?"
post #52 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post


EDIT: On second though, why am I even responding to someone who messes up "to" and "too?"

And your and you're.

I don't use aimpoint for the simple reasons 1) no access to teachers in my area yet 2) don't have the funds to pay for a course like that (I understand it is quite expensive)

If I had the funds and the access I would jump at it as it clearly has merit. Towards the end of last season I bought some True shoes and immediately noticed how easy it is to sense the break with your feet, I'll be looking to build on that discovery this season.
post #53 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mordan View Post

 

The degree of slope, the length of putt, the speed of the green might be guesses, but you're guessing them when you're reading a putt "normally" and then you're also guessing at the physics as well! I know I'd prefer to be doing the least amount of guessing I can.

Absolutely I'm guessing, as has every golfer since golf was devised. My point is that Aimpoint is slightly less of a guess than the traditional method but guessing it is. The thing that gripes me is the Aura of science and physics that is used to promote it.

post #54 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by logman View Post

Absolutely I'm guessing, as has every golfer since golf was devised. My point is that Aimpoint is slightly less of a guess than the traditional method but guessing it is. The thing that gripes me is the Aura of science and physics that is used to promote it.

 

It's not guessing.

 

The science and math goes into the charts. They're accurate to within 0.5 inches (because they've been rounded to whole inches, so somewhere there might be an 11.5 that's rounded to 12, though most of them are more likely to be rounded about 0.3333 on average).

 

AimPoint is a skill you can obtain. You can get to the point where you're quite accurate at determining the inputs. You can learn to tell the difference between a 2.5% slope and a 4% slope. You can learn your angles (really, that's something we don't have to practice much) and distances (almost nobody can't pace it off and get it right).

 

Or you can map your course, actually measuring them (like many of the pros will do - use maps, not map the greens themselves), and that eliminates virtually all "guessing."

 

I would agree that traditional green reading is full of guesses and "experience." AimPoint green reading is a skill with a scientific backing.

 

Does a scent dog "guess" or does it use a skill (which can be explained scientifically) when it tracks down something?

 

I'm blocking you from this thread because you've been told this several times now and simply refuse to acknowledge it. You simply keep posting the same drivel time and time again. True to your nature, you're not contributing anything - you're simply poking.

 

You gave it all away when you said "Aimpoint.... schmaimpoint..." You're not an open mind. Quite the opposite, and intentionally so.

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