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do you tip for bag drop? do you tip for cleaning your clubs at the end of your round? - Page 2

post #19 of 59

When the day comes that I can't carry my clubs 50 feet from my car to the course, or can't wipe down my own clubs, I will give up the game. As stated earlier, if they perform some extra service I will tip them. But to wipe down a clean set of clubs? No way. I just tell them mine are fine.

post #20 of 59

Living in New England, as I do, I never saw this practice (wiping clubs after a round) until I went to Florida last year.  I found it annoying, about like the street people that accost vehicles at traffic lights with dirty rags to wash windshields for a tip.  I prefer to be left alone.

post #21 of 59
$5/bag.....hmmmmmm. That's $20 a foursome and assuming 6 tee times an hour.....that's a slick $120/hr to hang out at the 18th green on a busy weekend. Who says working weekends in retirement isn't great. Where do I apply?
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by flintcreek6412 View Post

$5/bag.....hmmmmmm. That's $20 a foursome and assuming 6 tee times an hour.....that's a slick $120/hr to hang out at the 18th green on a busy weekend. Who says working weekends in retirement isn't great. Where do I apply?

Except that you're splitting that with the other 7 guys working the bag drop.....

 

Now factor in the cheap bastards that will pay $75 to play a round of golf, but won't stick a crowbar in the wallet for a couple of bucks, and you're right about at minimum wage.....

 

Still, not a bad retirement gig if you get free golf out of it too though.  a1_smile.gif

post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Except that you're splitting that with the other 7 guys working the bag drop.....

 

Now factor in the cheap bastards that will pay $75 to play a round of golf, but won't stick a crowbar in the wallet for a couple of bucks, and you're right about at minimum wage.....

That's one way to look at it.  But it's not the only way.

 

I would argue that if you're already charging me $75 for a round of golf, then why do you need to nickel and dime me for an extra service that I did not ask for, I don't want, and since I clean my own clubs after every shot anyway, I don't need?

 

I'd rather just pay $80 for the round.

 

Also, why do you need 8 guys at the bag drop? ;)

post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

That's one way to look at it.  But it's not the only way.

 

I would argue that if you're already charging me $75 for a round of golf, then why do you need to nickel and dime me for an extra service that I did not ask for, I don't want, and since I clean my own clubs after every shot anyway, I don't need?

 

I'd rather just pay $80 for the round.

 

Also, why do you need 8 guys at the bag drop? ;)

The point is, just because some of us tip well, doesn't mean that the bag drop guys are earning $120 an hour.

 

The OP asked, do you tip?  I do.  Of course, I also spent a lot of my youth as a caddie and working in other service type jobs. Maybe that gives me a perspective that some others don't have.

 

Regardless though, as I said, it's a simple solution.  Just tell them that you'll take care of your own bag.  If they "attack" your clubs while you're on the green, smile, say thank you and don't tip if you don't want to.  They're used to that too.

post #25 of 59

Having worked my way through grad school as a cart rat, I always tip unless there is no one there to take the clubs or it was basically self serve. If the guy is not present but was great before the round, I will leave a buck on the steering wheel. If the guys have a clean cart ready, load me up, are friendly and helpful, and then break them down they get 2 bucks on average. Occasionally, its a 5 for the cart. At some places where they know me, it pays off with free range balls or some extra holes. There has been some occasions where I have seen the guys out and get invited to play for free. 

 

The other day I was playing with a guy who just went on about his net worth and how much money he made when he sleeps in. I told my friend I guarantee you he stiffs the staff. Sure enough, he bolted. It turns out he had bought the summer card at that course and was trying to get the rate in the winter. No chance that would ever happen. 

 

If you don't want to tip, just politely say, "No thanks" and no one will be offended. If you have the guy wipe you down, replace your head covers, load up your car and then stiff them, they will remember that you were the guy who stiffed them. 

post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

The point is, just because some of us tip well, doesn't mean that the bag drop guys are earning $120 an hour.

 

The OP asked, do you tip?  I do.  Of course, I also spent a lot of my youth as a caddie and working in other service type jobs. Maybe that gives me a perspective that some others don't have.

 

Regardless though, as I said, it's a simple solution.  Just tell them that you'll take care of your own bag.  If they "attack" your clubs while you're on the green, smile, say thank you and don't tip if you don't want to.  They're used to that too.

Okie dokie!  All valid points. c2_beer.gif

post #27 of 59

First world problems...
 

Nothing like a $20 public course, inconsistent greens, un-raked sandtraps, puddles and bare spots to keep me golfing.

post #28 of 59

My problem is that I normally don't have cash on me... On top of that I wipe down my clubs after each shot so they don't need to be wiped down. If I can, I usually just tell them my clubs are fine and walk off. If I have a couple bucks and they get to them before I can say anything then I will tip (usually $2).

post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

The point is, just because some of us tip well, doesn't mean that the bag drop guys are earning $120 an hour.

 

The OP asked, do you tip?  I do.  Of course, I also spent a lot of my youth as a caddie and working in other service type jobs. Maybe that gives me a perspective that some others don't have.

 

Regardless though, as I said, it's a simple solution.  Just tell them that you'll take care of your own bag.  If they "attack" your clubs while you're on the green, smile, say thank you and don't tip if you don't want to.  They're used to that too.

Okie dokie!  All valid points. c2_beer.gif

 

Aw man, what's with all this warm fuzzy sh!t, I thought we were going to get to see a DiF vs Gd brawl!

post #30 of 59

I used to work at a very nice country club growing up.  I started there when the course opened, and I was a sophomore in high school.  We started with very, very few members (30 or 40) and they've now got 400-500 last I heard.  But I was the guy who picked you up from the parking lot and load your clubs and clean them after the round and take the cart back from your car. 

 

We certainly never expected tips.  We were already getting minimum wage ($5/hr), not waiter pay ($2/hr).  But they were always a nice bonus.  Average tip was probably between $2-$5.  Had one guy that gave us a $10 to load the clubs and a $20 to clean and unload the clubs.  Obviously, there was always a race to his car and we made sure those clubs sparkled.  Heck of a nice guy.  I still remember his name and his car 10 years after I graduated, so we obviously really appreciated that. 

 

In all honesty, I would rather have cleaned the clubs and not got a tip than be told not to worry about it.  It was always awkward when we would walk up and they'd say to leave them alone.  But that's just me.  We understood that some guys didn't have extra cash or didn't want to tip after the round or whatever.  But it was nice to get some extra cash when we could.  $5/hour doesn't pay for anything any more. 

 

I don't play courses like that but maybe once a year at most.  But if it's anybody older than high-school age, I don't bother tipping them.  I like helping out kids who need the money and will appreciate it.  But if you're just doing it to avoid getting a real job, you can support that habit on your own money. 

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dak4n6 View Post

 

Aw man, what's with all this warm fuzzy sh!t, I thought we were going to get to see a DiF vs Gd brawl!

LOL!  Sorry to disappoint.  Don't have strong enough opinions about the subject to bother getting worked up. b2_tongue.gif

 

The only thing about the subject that bugs me is when the cleaner guy is overly zealous and I have no cash. ;)  If I have cash, I tip, and if he asks me if I want them cleaned, I just say 'No, thank you."

post #32 of 59

We have guys that pull the bag out of our trunk and load the cart while we throw our shoes on (yes, we change our shoes in the parking lot at my place.) I give them a $3 tip, which makes me the biggest tipper there.

 

I assume that they do not wash the clubs afterwards because no one will tip for it. But they will take the private carts and wash them while the owner is inside having a few cold ones. They leave a card on there saying cleaned by ______, but I assume they are not getting tipped for it. (knowing our membership)

 

I have played several other courses, both public and private, where there is someone waiting as you pull off the 18th hole and follows you to your car to wash the clubs and throw them in the trunk. That gets them an automatic $2, if they put effort into cleaning the clubs, I'll give $5.

post #33 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flintcreek6412 View Post

$5/bag.....hmmmmmm. That's $20 a foursome and assuming 6 tee times an hour.....that's a slick $120/hr to hang out at the 18th green on a busy weekend. Who says working weekends in retirement isn't great. Where do I apply?

That's why there's a lineup of people ready to clean your clubs at the end of the round.

post #34 of 59
I hate our tipping culture. I like to know what I'm paying for up front. I've accepted that at restaurants you must tip. It makes sense because you want to ensure the food you'll be consuming is clean and safe to eat. I don't get why we've created a need to every other service provider. Put the cost of your time/effort in the service! The real problem is that tipping has gone to a nice to have (which someone who worked in this role mentioned earlier) to a must have. As in, you screwed me b/c you didn't give me any money for the 10sec I spent wiping a towel on your clubs. Or you screwed me because you didn't tip for the $50 cab ride. Tips are for service above and beyond; they're not for a person just doing his/her job.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgreen85 View Post

I hate our tipping culture. I like to know what I'm paying for up front. I've accepted that at restaurants you must tip. It makes sense because you want to ensure the food you'll be consuming is clean and safe to eat. I don't get why we've created a need to every other service provider. Put the cost of your time/effort in the service! The real problem is that tipping has gone to a nice to have (which someone who worked in this role mentioned earlier) to a must have. As in, you screwed me b/c you didn't give me any money for the 10sec I spent wiping a towel on your clubs. Or you screwed me because you didn't tip for the $50 cab ride. Tips are for service above and beyond; they're not for a person just doing his/her job.

 

I know what you are saying - when tip jars started showing up on check out counters at pizza places and coffee shops, at first I was indignant. But now, I just look at tipping as charity. Entitlement on a very local level. Look, these people are not pulling great salaries and many struggle to make ends meet and I feel good helping them out. I figure if you're not hurting for money, spread the wealth a little, it's really not a big deal, and it's good for your Karma.

post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgreen85 View Post

I hate our tipping culture. I like to know what I'm paying for up front.

 

I've traveled the world extensively on business and have seen all parts of the tipping culture, ranging from places where to tip is unthinkable to areas where it is off the charts.    I think our tipping culture here is a reasonable balance of pricing and the ability for someone to directly influence some of their pay for performance.    

 

Japan offers the traveler a stress-free approach where you never have to concern yourself with tipping for anything and to offer one can be seen as an insult, but it doesn't really let you recognize those that have truly gone above and beyond other than to offer a sincere "domo arigato gozaimashita".       I've been in other places like Malaysia where the tip was part of the negotiation process before you even received the service.    

 

In business, it would always be nice if we could pay our employees a totally variable compensation based on the job they do, but between collective bargaining agreements and the difficulty in objectively valuing each employee's contribution differently, this is a nearly impossible compensation methodology to achieve.   Many places end up with bonus schemes that have a nearly-guaranteed bonus (e.g. 10%) and if you do really great you get higher (like 20%) and if you do really bad you get lower (like 5%) based on management's determination.    In the service industries, tipping provides a means to skip management as the middle man in this scheme and put it directly in the customer's hands.    There's a nice efficiency to this.

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