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Lose and Loose- Please stop spelling Lose "Loose" Please. Please. - Page 2

post #19 of 29

Grammatical and typographical errors keep my mind sharp, because I'm always on alert for them.  Plus they are at times amusing.  So I don't mind them so much a1_smile.gif

post #20 of 29

Spelling of "separate" as "seperate".  I still remember how a grade school teacher taught my class.  Separate... you'd like to be "sep-a-rat-ed" from "a rat"  wouldn't you?  

post #21 of 29

So we should lose the loose?

post #22 of 29

Poor grammar and spelling have been around for a long time.  It's becoming so mainstream that it is widely accepted anymore.  Here's an example:

 

From a Ford truck commercial:

 

"We purchased my father the new Ford F-150."

 

What?  You purchased your father?  How much did he cost?

 

Another example:

 

"Recommend me a new driver."

 

Ok, I'm recommending you as a new driver.  This is what you asked. Is that what you meant?
 

One of my sons is a 2nd year college student.  English Comp 101 opened his eyes to the many freshmen and sophomores who, a) cannot spell; b) cannot put a simple sentence together; c) cannot organize thoughts cohesively; d) don't understand the concept of one sentence, one idea.

 

And just think, we have generations who will come after us whose highest level of communication skills are 'wher u at?' sent from a 'dumb phone.'

 

dave

post #23 of 29

What opened my eyes to poor grammar in writing was my first year of law school.  There is a Legal Process class which is basically English writing for law students.  I thought I was a good writer until my professor tore all of my papers apart.  I realized just how inefficient and ineffective my writing was.  

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave s View Post

Poor grammar and spelling have been around for a long time.  It's becoming so mainstream that it is widely accepted anymore.  Here's an example:

 

From a Ford truck commercial:

 

"We purchased my father the new Ford F-150."

 

What?  You purchased your father?  How much did he cost?

 

Another example:

 

"Recommend me a new driver."

 

 

 

Aren't these just examples of how the indirect object and direct object could be confused in English?  (Not necessarily incorrect grammar, just ambiguous, with the meaning made clear by the context.)  I agree that they would be better by addition of a preposition. 

 

I'm not an English teacher.  Just asking.

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave s View Post

Poor grammar and spelling have been around for a long time.  It's becoming so mainstream that it is widely accepted anymore.  Here's an example:

 

From a Ford truck commercial:

 

"We purchased my father the new Ford F-150."

 

What?  You purchased your father?  How much did he cost?

 

Another example:

 

"Recommend me a new driver."

 

Ok, I'm recommending you as a new driver.  This is what you asked. Is that what you meant?
 

One of my sons is a 2nd year college student.  English Comp 101 opened his eyes to the many freshmen and sophomores who, a) cannot spell; b) cannot put a simple sentence together; c) cannot organize thoughts cohesively; d) don't understand the concept of one sentence, one idea.

 

And just think, we have generations who will come after us whose highest level of communication skills are 'wher u at?' sent from a 'dumb phone.'

 

dave

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Swede View Post

 

 

Aren't these just examples of how the indirect object and direct object could be confused in English?  (Not necessarily incorrect grammar, just ambiguous, with the meaning made clear by the context.)  I agree that they would be better by addition of a preposition. 

 

I'm not an English teacher.  Just asking.

I think you're right.  I'm also not an English teacher nor was I even a good English student ;) but I'm pretty sure that is what is known as a dangling participle.  Easy to confuse what is being modified if you're not careful. :)

 

I don't think that really qualifies as bad grammar (other than for really anal language nazis), but moreso just quirky grammar.

post #26 of 29

Best fiasco I can remember is when Coors came out with a new beer in the 1990's.  They launched, "Artic Ice".  We were dying laughing at my company because we had launched a new fragranced product "Arctic Ice" about six months previous.  How the hell the spell checkers in their Art Department missed that is beyond me.  It was pulled from the shelves within a month.  Someone got fired over that I hope.

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Swede View Post

Aren't these just examples of how the indirect object and direct object could be confused in English?  (Not necessarily incorrect grammar, just ambiguous, with the meaning made clear by the context.)  I agree that they would be better by addition of a preposition. 

 

I'm not an English teacher.  Just asking.

I like the current thread on here entitled "What makes you like a course."

 

I don't know ... I have a couple of holes in me, some water, some OB, and some days I'm groomed really nice, others not so much.  Definitely no doglegs though.

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

I like the current thread on here entitled "What makes you like a course."

I don't know ... I have a couple of holes in me, some water, some OB, and some days I'm groomed really nice, others not so much.  Definitely no doglegs though.

Maybe no doglegs, but how about a hog leg...b1_ohmy.gif
post #29 of 29

Little trick to help people remember:

 

Loose has two "o"s, like stool.

 

Betcha won't forget now. 

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