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the epic meltdown thread.... - Page 3

post #37 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

I typically just hit the ground with my club and curse. I have only thrown clubs a few times and usually only when alone or in a direction opposite where people are as not to hurt anyone. Luckily none have broken. I really noticed when I let the bad holes go and just focus on my swing I do much better. The more angry I got the harder I tried and the worse I did, made for a vicious cycle.

 

Haha.

 

I throw clubs for fun sometimes. The furthest I ever threw one was about 80 yards, and it was on accident. It was dumping down and my driver just slipped right out of my hands.

 

My buddy gave me the classic Happy Gilmore line: "HA, the club went further than the ball!"

post #38 of 60

I really never have "meltdowns". I get pissed off like anyone else, but I will laugh it off or just cuss a little bit and have a beer to cool down.

A few weeks ago, I actually stopped talking to a guy that I've known for many years due to his anger problems. The guy is a once-a-week golfer and has no mechanics/form whatsoever, fluffs lies and still gets pissed off when he duffs (which happens at least once on every hole, or every other hole). In one of his little tantrums of rage, he blindly chucked his club at his cart. My cart happened to be parked slightly forward of his and right next to it. Out of no where I hear my name called and a "heads up". The club head hit me in the thigh and I had an instant bruise... and I don't bruise easily.

I simply blew up and cussed him out because I was rightfully pissed off. It was either that or do something that I would really regret and thankfully my brain kept control of my fists.

Anyway, some meltdowns are funny... but just remember how easy it is to "vent" and do something really, really stupid without thinking about it.

Not throwing stones here or anything, but I definitely don't throw clubs or act like an idiot/maniac and draw attention. Those guys need help... and more "life experience".

post #39 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

I really never have "meltdowns". I get pissed off like anyone else, but I will laugh it off or just cuss a little bit and have a beer to cool down.

A few weeks ago, I actually stopped talking to a guy that I've known for many years due to his anger problems. The guy is a once-a-week golfer and has no mechanics/form whatsoever, fluffs lies and still gets pissed off when he duffs (which happens at least once on every hole, or every other hole). In one of his little tantrums of rage, he blindly chucked his club at his cart. My cart happened to be parked slightly forward of his and right next to it. Out of no where I hear my name called and a "heads up". The club head hit me in the thigh and I had an instant bruise... and I don't bruise easily.

I simply blew up and cussed him out because I was rightfully pissed off. It was either that or do something that I would really regret and thankfully my brain kept control of my fists.

Anyway, some meltdowns are funny... but just remember how easy it is to "vent" and do something really, really stupid without thinking about it.

Not throwing stones here or anything, but I definitely don't throw clubs or act like an idiot/maniac and draw attention. Those guys need help... and more "life experience".

That would make me so mad.  What a douche.  I have an acquaintance that resembles your friend.  Big downer to play with and even worse to share a cart.  If I'm paired up in a cart with him you can guarantee my round will easily be +8 strokes because it is so mentally frustrating to put up with it, and physically exhausting to be looking for balls all day.

 

Side note.

 

A friend and I were paired up with a middle aged man the other day.  It was hot outside and it was apparent that he wasn't playing well.  After four putting out on a par 5 which took him 5 to reach, he batted his ball off the green and it went flying.   He then threw his putter. I was squatting on the fringe reading my putt and the ball missed me by about four feet.  Had it hit me we would've had a problem and he wasn't the type who looked like he wanted a problem.  Luckily he quickly bucked up when we both ignored him and said "Sorry guys I'm not feeling well" and jetted back to the clubhouse after his little tantrum.

post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post


Not throwing stones here or anything, but I definitely don't throw clubs or act like an idiot/maniac and draw attention. Those guys need help... and more "life experience".

Depending on the outburst I don't know that it's fair to say this. I don't need help or more "life experience".... I don't lose my temper in other aspects of my life, but for some reason golf just has a way of doing it. I don't get angry at my clubs, ball, weather, shoes, etc, I get angry at myself. That being said, recently I've embraced the knowledge that the anger is directly influencing more bad play. Part of why I've been more inclined to get angry at myself recently is because prior to this year I hadn't played golf in several years, and before that break I was actually getting to be pretty good as I was able to shape my shots and hit greens in regulation most times. I think had I actually bothered with handicap at that point I would have been close to 13 or so. Not great by any means but when I started again this year I was probably 30+. Seeing such a dramatic difference in my golfing ability caused much self loathing on the course and I almost gave up golf for good. Had it not been for my father repeatedly reminding me that it'd get better and that I can't expect to jump right back into it and do well I would have quit. I think most times people overestimate how good they are/should be and when they hit bad shots it reminds them they aren't that good and that feeds the anger more than just accepting your level of skill and moving on.

post #41 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

Depending on the outburst I don't know that it's fair to say this. I don't need help or more "life experience".... I don't lose my temper in other aspects of my life, but for some reason golf just has a way of doing it. I don't get angry at my clubs, ball, weather, shoes, etc, I get angry at myself. That being said, recently I've embraced the knowledge that the anger is directly influencing more bad play. Part of why I've been more inclined to get angry at myself recently is because prior to this year I hadn't played golf in several years, and before that break I was actually getting to be pretty good as I was able to shape my shots and hit greens in regulation most times. I think had I actually bothered with handicap at that point I would have been close to 13 or so. Not great by any means but when I started again this year I was probably 30+. Seeing such a dramatic difference in my golfing ability caused much self loathing on the course and I almost gave up golf for good. Had it not been for my father repeatedly reminding me that it'd get better and that I can't expect to jump right back into it and do well I would have quit. I think most times people overestimate how good they are/should be and when they hit bad shots it reminds them they aren't that good and that feeds the anger more than just accepting your level of skill and moving on.

That's what a handicap is for.  You have 26 awful shots to make.  26 shanks, pulls, whatever you want.  12 a side.  Count down from 26.  Only once you reach your 27th awful shot then you have the right to be angry.  

 

I recognize that I'll have 6-7 bad shots per nine.  This is NOT a self-fulfilling prophecy as some days I don't have but 2 or 3.  It is just a mental safety net.  It turns a 42 on the front (which is not the best thing in the world) to a "wow, I only made 6 mistakes that I didn't recover from.

 

Bobby Jones said something along the lines of "three bad shots and one good shot still make par."

post #42 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJBam View Post

That's what a handicap is for.  You have 26 awful shots to make.  26 shanks, pulls, whatever you want.  12 a side.  Count down from 26.  Only once you reach your 27th awful shot then you have the right to be angry.  

 

I recognize that I'll have 6-7 bad shots per nine.  This is NOT a self-fulfilling prophecy as some days I don't have but 2 or 3.  It is just a mental safety net.  It turns a 42 on the front (which is not the best thing in the world) to a "wow, I only made 6 mistakes that I didn't recover from.

 

Bobby Jones said something along the lines of "three bad shots and one good shot still make par."

You skipped the part about I was a much better golfer prior to my 3 yr hiatus. Therefore I was used to making substantially fewer bad shots. I really should just remove my handicap from my profile as I don't know what it is anymore. I was keeping track of my scores before until I got sick of looking at the abysmal results. However, recently I've made piece with the fact that I had to basically start over and that actually helped me improve a lot faster due to accepting the bad shots and learning from them as well as my good shots. A lot has to do with whether you want to improve or are satisfied with playing at whatever level you are at. I'm the type of person who wants to get as good as I can.

post #43 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

Depending on the outburst I don't know that it's fair to say this. I don't need help or more "life experience".... I don't lose my temper in other aspects of my life, but for some reason golf just has a way of doing it. I don't get angry at my clubs, ball, weather, shoes, etc, I get angry at myself. That being said, recently I've embraced the knowledge that the anger is directly influencing more bad play. Part of why I've been more inclined to get angry at myself recently is because prior to this year I hadn't played golf in several years, and before that break I was actually getting to be pretty good as I was able to shape my shots and hit greens in regulation most times. I think had I actually bothered with handicap at that point I would have been close to 13 or so. Not great by any means but when I started again this year I was probably 30+. Seeing such a dramatic difference in my golfing ability caused much self loathing on the course and I almost gave up golf for good. Had it not been for my father repeatedly reminding me that it'd get better and that I can't expect to jump right back into it and do well I would have quit. I think most times people overestimate how good they are/should be and when they hit bad shots it reminds them they aren't that good and that feeds the anger more than just accepting your level of skill and moving on.

My statement about "life experience" is not really unfair to say, in my opinion. Those who are matured through happiness and/or hardships tend to hit a point in their lives when they learn to appreciate, enjoy, and not take for granted the leisure time and luxuries that life provides them with - such as golf. I find that many people who have a sense of arrogance, entitlement, or haven't really had much of "life's offerings" smack them in the face from time to time are the ones who are acting like maniacs on the golf course.

Again, everyone blows off steam and cusses a little and what not... that's all fine and good. Golf is frustrating as hell at times and it's understandable to step outside of the "Well, I'm not a professional and this shit will happen" stage and expect to do well on every shot and get annoyed.

I have a pretty twisted and crazy sense of humor myself, but my line in the sand is club throwing, repetitive piss-poor attitude which includes: club throwing, pouting, bringing those around you down with your attitude, damaging property (whether it be the course's, mine, or your property) and simply being whiny and unbearable to be around.

post #44 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

You skipped the part about I was a much better golfer prior to my 3 yr hiatus. Therefore I was used to making substantially fewer bad shots. I really should just remove my handicap from my profile as I don't know what it is anymore. I was keeping track of my scores before until I got sick of looking at the abysmal results. However, recently I've made piece with the fact that I had to basically start over and that actually helped me improve a lot faster due to accepting the bad shots and learning from them as well as my good shots. A lot has to do with whether you want to improve or are satisfied with playing at whatever level you are at. I'm the type of person who wants to get as good as I can.

Well establish or estimate your handicap so you aren't comparing your game to what it was 3 years ago.  If I compared my current "abs" (LOL) to pictures of me in high school every day, I would not be a happy camper.  

 

That way, you can make "piece" with your game c2_beer.gif

post #45 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJBam View Post

Well establish or estimate your handicap so you aren't comparing your game to what it was 3 years ago.  If I compared my current "abs" (LOL) to pictures of me in high school every day, I would not be a happy camper.  

 

That way, you can make "piece" with your game c2_beer.gif

Again, I already have. I basically just accept that I had to start over. To be honest I feel like I may actually end up being a better golfer in the end due to realizing that I had some bad habits from before.

post #46 of 60
Thread Starter 

Oh, and how can we forget what a tragic meltdown Tripp Isenhour had?  I just remembered this.....Apparently he was giving a lesson or something when a red tailed hawk kept chirping in a tree near him.  Tripp then proceeded to hit and kill the hawk by hitting golf shots at it.  Kind of ironic that he had the accuracy to kill such a great bird yet he could not hit enough fairways or greens to stay on tour.....

post #47 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjwestner View Post
 

Oh, and how can we forget what a tragic meltdown Tripp Isenhour had?  I just remembered this.....Apparently he was giving a lesson or something when a red tailed hawk kept chirping in a tree near him.  Tripp then proceeded to hit and kill the hawk by hitting golf shots at it.  Kind of ironic that he had the accuracy to kill such a great bird yet he could not hit enough fairways or greens to stay on tour.....

 

http://sports.espn.go.com/golf/news/story?id=3279958

 

LOL I had never heard that story.  Looks like it's valid.  Worth a read.

post #48 of 60
Thread Starter 

He does not love animals, he's just sorry he got caught.  It took him 6 shots......1/6 = 17%. 

post #49 of 60

I actually had the opposite of a melt down Saturday, started out with a 9 on the first hole and ended up with only 44 after the front 9. So started out 5 over after 1 and only 8 over after 9.... I didn't take time to warm up and I'm almost positive that my ball was picked up because I saw a couple of golf carts and people in the general area I expected my ball would be but it was nowhere to be found. Unable to return to the tee to hit because the group behind me was already set to tee off I dropped 3 and hit 4. I missed all my bird putts but still ended up with 6 pars, 1 double and 1 bogey after the first hole. Would have been my best 9 ever.... 

post #50 of 60

I never have had a meltdown on the course but after a really good lesion by an ex PGA instructor and shooting really well on a golf vacation in Scottsdale I came back home and shot 3 awful rounds including one where I gave away my 3 wood.

 

I have taken off 6 years until this year.  I am back and loving the game again.

 

I wish I hadn't taken the time off but hey, it got me back and better than ever

post #51 of 60

I don't mean for this to sound as if I think I'm sitting on my high horse because that's certainly not the case, but I've never really had a meltdown on the course. Sure, I cuss about a bad shot at times and have slammed my driver before after that slight draw I imagined turned into a massive hook out of bounds, but I just don't ever really have the urge to throw clubs or anything of that nature. I deal with my frustration differently, and that's by mentally just shutting down. I don't talk to any one or say anything at all, I just go through my shot routines and hit the ball. It comes across as if I'm holding my composure really well, but I'm not. My friends have commented about how I never get mad about a bad shot and how they wish they could do that, but the truth is I don't deal with it any better than them. On the outside I seem calm and focused, but when I'm addressing the ball my thoughts are still on that shot that I hit OB... I can typically dismiss a few bad shots and regain focus pretty well. Rarely do I reach the point of completely shutting down, but when I do you can pretty much guarantee my round is going to continue to be terrible.

 

My brother-in-law is completely opposite from me, and he'll throw anything he can get his hands on. The sad thing is he's a pretty good golfer, but one bad hole can ruin his entire round. He's broke several wedges over his knee, and sent a few more to the bottom of ponds as well. Not to speak poorly of anyone who acts similarly, but I find him very distracting to play with and get tired of constantly having to compliment his game in an effort to keep his attitude positive for the sake of my own concentration.

 

In high school there was a kid from our rival school that was well known for acting like a psycho on the golf course. He was a pretty decent golfer, but just went nuts over bad shots. One day on the last hole he hit a ball in the woods and went to sling his driver. Well he held it too long and threw it right at his playing partners, which included me, my teammate, and a teammate of his. We all ducked, but his teammate didn't make it in time and the head of the driver crushed his nose. My teammate cussed him up one side and down the other, with some assistance from me, while we tended to his teammate and called for help. That kid was kicked off of the team that day.

 

Getting mad on the course is one thing, and we all do it. When it reaches the point of being dangerous to others though, that crosses the line. Also, I think one of the reasons I handle it the way I do is because I try not to let my behavior affect the others I'm playing with. I know how much I hate playing with my brother-in-law when he acts that way, so I just shut up and keep to myself. It doesn't help me any, but I like to think that it doesn't make my playing partners lose focus.

post #52 of 60

My epic meltdown consisted of me getting so pissed that I tried to throw my ball about 10 yards into the water hazard after holing out for par, and the ball only went about 9 yards and got caught up in the rough.  So I ended up picking it up and putting it in my bag.

 

I get pissed off but I mostly internalize it and don't let it manifest itself into anything.

post #53 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bplewis24 View Post
 

My epic meltdown consisted of me getting so pissed that I tried to throw my ball about 10 yards into the water hazard after holing out for par, and the ball only went about 9 yards and got caught up in the rough.  So I ended up picking it up and putting it in my bag.

 

I get pissed off but I mostly internalize it and don't let it manifest itself into anything.

 

My "anger" results in missed short putt balls being tossed up and smashed into the woods via my putter. Haha

post #54 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddog10 View Post
 

I don't mean for this to sound as if I think I'm sitting on my high horse because that's certainly not the case, but I've never really had a meltdown on the course. Sure, I cuss about a bad shot at times and have slammed my driver before after that slight draw I imagined turned into a massive hook out of bounds, but I just don't ever really have the urge to throw clubs or anything of that nature. I deal with my frustration differently, and that's by mentally just shutting down. I don't talk to any one or say anything at all, I just go through my shot routines and hit the ball. It comes across as if I'm holding my composure really well, but I'm not. My friends have commented about how I never get mad about a bad shot and how they wish they could do that, but the truth is I don't deal with it any better than them. On the outside I seem calm and focused, but when I'm addressing the ball my thoughts are still on that shot that I hit OB... I can typically dismiss a few bad shots and regain focus pretty well. Rarely do I reach the point of completely shutting down, but when I do you can pretty much guarantee my round is going to continue to be terrible.

 

My brother-in-law is completely opposite from me, and he'll throw anything he can get his hands on. The sad thing is he's a pretty good golfer, but one bad hole can ruin his entire round. He's broke several wedges over his knee, and sent a few more to the bottom of ponds as well. Not to speak poorly of anyone who acts similarly, but I find him very distracting to play with and get tired of constantly having to compliment his game in an effort to keep his attitude positive for the sake of my own concentration.

 

In high school there was a kid from our rival school that was well known for acting like a psycho on the golf course. He was a pretty decent golfer, but just went nuts over bad shots. One day on the last hole he hit a ball in the woods and went to sling his driver. Well he held it too long and threw it right at his playing partners, which included me, my teammate, and a teammate of his. We all ducked, but his teammate didn't make it in time and the head of the driver crushed his nose. My teammate cussed him up one side and down the other, with some assistance from me, while we tended to his teammate and called for help. That kid was kicked off of the team that day.

 

Getting mad on the course is one thing, and we all do it. When it reaches the point of being dangerous to others though, that crosses the line. Also, I think one of the reasons I handle it the way I do is because I try not to let my behavior affect the others I'm playing with. I know how much I hate playing with my brother-in-law when he acts that way, so I just shut up and keep to myself. It doesn't help me any, but I like to think that it doesn't make my playing partners lose focus.

 

I share your sentiment.

 

Like most other people, I get upset over a bad shot or a bad result and whereas I'll get frustrated, I know it's not the clubs fault - it's mine.  I also know how much my clubs cost me and seeing as how I can't afford to buy a new set of irons anytime soon, I'm not about to destroy the set.  I suppose I'm lucky in that I'm pretty even keel and the most I do is curse and every once in a while hit my club on the ground.  After that, though, I easily let it go and continue my round.  I won't say that it doesn't impact the rest of my round, I know when I'm having a bad round (for me) and just try and clear my mind and get to the finish line.

 

I must be lucky in that there's no one that I play with regularly that has had a melt down in front of me.  At times I'll see my playing partners get really frustrated and I have to try and hide my laughter sometimes at what they're going through.

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