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Why aren't there more pro's with swings that resemble Fred Couple's? - Page 2

post #19 of 45

i don't care about what thorbjorn says after his rounds and in private time, i was only commenting about his swing.

same as for Tiger, so much haters after his personal issues, i really don't care still is the best golfer out there. 

post #20 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomvk77 View Post

i don't care about what thorbjorn says after his rounds and in private time, i was only commenting about his swing.

same as for Tiger, so much haters after his personal issues, i really don't care still is the best golfer out there. 

 

qe?
post #21 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by fantum View Post

There are none that look like his. It seems so natural and relaxed. Should we mortals try to emulate him?

 

There are few people on this planet that are cool enough to swing like Freddy. It's a hard thing to accomplish because Freddy doesn't have to try to be cool, he just is, so trying to emulate his swing is futile in its very meaning. The closest way to get to the essence of Freddy is to be yourself and radiate your inner "je ne sais quoi". That's his secret. 

post #22 of 45

Few players have Freddie's flexibility to rotate their upper bodies against an absolutely silent lower body and even fewer have his natural balance-the very definition of "pure butter"

 

Few tour players have these old classic swings because their swings have been Leadpoisoned.

 

Freddie holds and releases vs. Flipper/rollers.

 

I love Jim Mclean's pragmatic, evidence driven approach to the swing.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWeBS7vd5a4

 

Release styles on tour.....a bit technical.

 

http://www.aroundhawaii.com/lifestyle/health_and_fitness/2013-04-whats-your-release-style-part-1.html

 

The case for a stronger grip rather than a weaker grip.

 

http://www.aroundhawaii.com/lifestyle/health_and_fitness/2011-07-pga-tour-grip-styles-part-1.html

post #23 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Weatherby View Post

Few players have Freddie's flexibility to rotate their upper bodies against an absolutely silent lower body and even fewer have his natural balance-the very definition of "pure butter"

 

 

really, silent lower body?, his back leg has straightened out a bit there from his address position. He rotate's his hips open in the backswing like majority of the players on Tour due. Even though most of them say, "Keep the lower body quiet in the backswing", saying and actually doing it is two different things. Its impossible to do, they all rotate 85+ degrees in the backswing with there shoulders, to get there the hips must open up, only a contortionist is able to rotate there upper body that much and not have the hips move.

 

Freddie has one of the easy swing for the ages, I think he really underachieved in his career. If there's one thing i would take away from freddie is, proper sequence of movements, and always swing with in yourself, in balance. Really if you look at tour players in general, at the practice range, just look at the effortless power they generate. They are never straining to hit a shot. Then go to your local golf course driving range, and see how many people are hitting with good tempo. Most are trying to kill the ball.

post #24 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by uttexas View Post

Not many people could consistently recover from his top of the backswing position (way across the line, right elbow very high with lots of separation from the chest)



At the very beginning of his backswing, he lifts the club up and away from his body with his arms--very unorthodox

 

Oh, you got to be careful when saying he's in a bad place at the top. Freddie was known for having one of the biggest shoulder turns in the game. If you take 90 degree shoulder turn, with golf club pointing parallel down the target line, then you rotate more, were's the club going to point? Right of the target line, were freddie's club is pointing. So he could be perfectly were he wants to be.

post #25 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

 

 

really, silent lower body?, his back leg has straightened out a bit there from his address position. He rotate's his hips open in the backswing like majority of the players on Tour due. Even though most of them say, "Keep the lower body quiet in the backswing", saying and actually doing it is two different things. Its impossible to do, they all rotate 85+ degrees in the backswing with there shoulders, to get there the hips must open up, only a contortionist is able to rotate there upper body that much and not have the hips move.

 

Freddie has one of the easy swing for the ages, I think he really underachieved in his career. If there's one thing i would take away from freddie is, proper sequence of movements, and always swing with in yourself, in balance. Really if you look at tour players in general, at the practice range, just look at the effortless power they generate. They are never straining to hit a shot. Then go to your local golf course driving range, and see how many people are hitting with good tempo. Most are trying to kill the ball.

 

Really.

 

Listen to Jim Mclean at 2:30-3:00 on the video that I posted.

 

I was not talking about angles.   The right leg must brace.  His right leg is like the Rock of Gibraltar.  Freddie does not rotate his hips 85 degrees.  I estimate his shoulder rotation of 105 degrees and hips maybe 15 degrees.

 

His lower body is quiet all the way back.  Coming down is a different story.

post #26 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Weatherby View Post

 

Really.

 

Freddie does not rotate his hips 85 degrees.

 

He said "with the shoulders" Eddie. 85° with the shoulders.

post #27 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

He said "with the shoulders" Eddie. 85° with the shoulders.

Ok, I read and misunderstood, "He rotate's his hips open in the backswing like majority of the players on Tour" and misinterpreted what was said.

 

No good player intentionally "rotates" their hips into the backswing.  Some rotation results but it is not an action. 

 

The point that I was trying to make is that Freddie has relatively little hip rotation and has a very quiet lower body on the backswing owing to his superb, god-like flexibility and balance.  Pure rotation.

post #28 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Weatherby View Post

No good player intentionally "rotates" their hips into the backswing.  Some rotation results but it is not an action.

 

I think that's wrong. I think you'll find that a lot of top level players rotate their hips. Who knows what you mean by "intentionally" though - they may not have to actively "think" about it (though some do, and since you said "no good player" finding one is all that's necessary here).

 

Welcome to the site, Eddie (set an avatar ASAP please) - you'll find there's a lot of knowledge and a willingness to discuss here, but the same is expected in return. Blanket statements like that generally go over like lead balloons (which don't even need to be shot down, because they don't take flight).

post #29 of 45

His swing has always been my favorite.  I think it's simply because he's so damn cool.  His swing completely fits the rest of his personality.  

post #30 of 45

I certainly wouldn't say I try and emulate Freddie Couples' swing.  BUT, he has helped me with my tempo for sure.  He and Ernie both. . .I like the smooth buttery swings.  I have back trouble, had surgery in 2011. . .So, I understand the importance of Freddie's flexibility--or lack there of--depending on his health.

 

They both help to remind me, "Don't overswing." 
 

post #31 of 45

Overswinging isn't a problem, look at John Daly. Classic overswinger, even his wedge shots, but what he had was balance, good tempo. People get confused on this. Though overswinging can lead to off tempo, if your use to it, its not a problem. What most people have a problem with is tempo. They lash out at the ball. That's what tour players don't due 99% of the time (except if your tiger and you like to hit 200 yard 9 irons, fricken beast).

post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Weatherby View Post

 

I was not talking about angles.   The right leg must brace.  His right leg is like the Rock of Gibraltar.  Freddie does not rotate his hips 85 degrees.  I estimate his shoulder rotation of 105 degrees and hips maybe 15 degrees.

 

His lower body is quiet all the way back.  Coming down is a different story.

 

I'll just share these videos and hope people can see he turns his hips more than 15 degrees.  Try hitting a ball with only 15 degrees of hips turn and see how far you can hit it.

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

Overswinging isn't a problem, look at John Daly. Classic overswinger, even his wedge shots, but what he had was balance, good tempo. People get confused on this. Though overswinging can lead to off tempo, if your use to it, its not a problem. 

 

Swinging past parallel is fine as long as you can still sequence the arms with the pivot.

post #33 of 45

Maybe they don't want to blow out their back like Fred has.

post #34 of 45

Hmm its nice ti find this discussion of the Freddy swing.

I have spent the last 6 weeks trying to work it out.

Why? cause i want to play with a fade and i have always loved the swing.
Its a wonderful way to hit the ball.
 

Heres what I have worked out:

The strong grip is essential.

It is key to the 'outside the line takeaway' and  early set and u must maintain it at the top, so giving that cuppy look to the left wrist.

His backswing is' arms and shoulder's initially . He then completes it with a massive shoulder turn - so that at the top he is on plane for the first time!

The legs (open stance, not much knee bend ) dont do much , just turn in sympathy with that 'arm and shoulder dominated backswing'.

He has a pause at the top then begins the down swing with a pretty big hip shift to the left.

RT elbow tucks in and then he rips it.

 

Its not natural unless u are Fred

but it can be learnt!

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by highcut28 View Post

Heres what I have worked out:

The strong grip is essential.

It is key to the 'outside the line takeaway' and  early set and u must maintain it at the top, so giving that cuppy look to the left wrist.

His backswing is' arms and shoulder's initially . He then completes it with a massive shoulder turn - so that at the top he is on plane for the first time!

The legs (open stance, not much knee bend ) dont do much , just turn in sympathy with that 'arm and shoulder dominated backswing'.

He has a pause at the top then begins the down swing with a pretty big hip shift to the left.

RT elbow tucks in and then he rips it.

 

 

Arms appear to be more "outside" because of how far to the left he aims at address

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post

 

Arms appear to be more "outside" because of how far to the left he aims at address

Yes, but I think it truly is 'outside;.

Watch this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rz6fLTbDcFI

At abt 3 mins he talks abt that backswing .


Then there the magical timing !

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