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When novice golfers "man up," and how it kills their game... - Page 2

post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post

- Implementing a feel in their swing (even if it has nothing to do with their issues) because they saw it recommended in someone else's lesson or in an instruction video.

Easy there!  I never...a2_wink.gif

post #20 of 56

The devil's advocate post :p

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post

After watching a lot of poor golfers on the course, and reading a lot of threads on this forum, I've discovered a lot of things that we novice/intermediate golfers do to "improve" our game, which are actually hurting us. And many of them stem from the innate desire to "man up."

I've started the conversation with this list of common errors related to male chauvinism. I will gladly admit - at one time or another, I have been guilty of most of these crimes myself. But now that I've personally benefited from curbing my libido, none of this bothers me anymore.
 


-Swinging way, way too hard.

 

-Spending all your time on the range perfecting your big drive, and none perfecting your chipping and putting.

 

-Dropping $500 on the latest driver, which will likely perform no better than a basic model.

 

-Buying any driver with a loft that is way too low (I've seen a lot of novices with 9's in the bag)


-Using a Pro-V1 when what you probably need is a decent 2-piece distance ball.


-Buying stiff shafts when regulars are probably more appropriate for your swing speed.

 

-Not wanting to convert lower irons to hybrids, because "hybrids are for wussies."
 


I'm sure there's more. Please, add to this list with your own "Viagara" moments, or ones you've seen others commit.

 

- Swinging hard is different than swinging out of balance. You can swing good, and swing hard, look at McDowell, he looks like he just lashes out at the ball with anger. Then you look at Luke Donald, he doesn't. Both win, both play good golf.

 

- Yet, if you hit a driver OB, your now hitting 3 from the tee, instead of hitting two from the fairway. Just saying. Distance, and accuracy off the tee will help out a ton of people enhance there potential for scoring overall

 

- Actually depending on the driver, $500 dollar one could be better. The right after market golf shaft could give a person the accuracy and distance advantage they need. A driver that's adjustable could let the person tune in the driver to right were its perfect for them. Don't disregard technology, or paying for it, when you know what your doing when your buying something. If your use to playing a fade, and need a draw, adjusting the driver could help promote more of a draw for a golf course, giving you and advantage. Basic driver doesn't do that.

 

- Low lofts, i don't see that to often. So don't know why its here in this list. Oh, what about the drivers now that are one driver, but have 4-5 loft settings? That wouldn't fall into this category would it?

 

- There is a great blog post i found on difference between cavity backs and blade irons. The premise is that cavity backs will lower a golfer's capability to learn because it dampens feel. So, i would put this in the same category. If you hit a two piece ball and mishits, misputts, mischips feel similar to a normal shot. Then i would say it defeats the purpose of having a golf ball. Part of the game is recognizing what the club to ball interaction is. This is why i will never promote a two-piece cheap golf ball because they all feel the same, like hitting concrete.

 

- Tough to say, there is no defined stiffness ranking for golf shafts. A regular in one setting could be a stiff in another, especially if you get a  heavy versus a light shaft. A heavy stiff could be an extra stiff light. So, when you see stiff, and it's a 50 gram shaft, its probably not that stiff. Don't judge a book by its cover. Also, stiff doesn't matter much when you also break down the torque on the club, and the kick point.

 

- I can't refute hybrids :p

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post

 

I'll add 

 

- Determining their yardages off their best shots and not off their average shot.

- Looking for a quick tip that will solve all the ball striking issues.

- Saying they'll "try it" in regards to good golf instruction and then move on to something else when it "stops working".  It's not the feel or motion that's not working, it's that you're not doing it enough.

- Implementing a feel in their swing (even if it has nothing to do with their issues) because they saw it recommended in someone else's lesson or in an instruction video.

 

- Though, then when you take your average, and you jack an iron, you end up 10 yards over the green, you just end up in water or a bunker. Especially if your a person who hits the ball with a wide variance. That could be death if you catch one. I rather have catching one not kill your round, because its bad to really relate a good golf shot with a bad turn out.

 

- What if the quick tip works?

post #21 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by badfish74 View Post

I did the exact same thing.  I pulled my 3 wood on the tee for almost a whole season because I knew I could hit it accurately and about the same distance.  After awhile though I hit with my driver exclusively because I felt I needed to be able to learn to utilize the club.  I am glad I did because the last couple of rounds and range sessions something has clicked for me with the driver.  I am hitting it better than I ever have and with better consistency as well. It's nice to be able to have the extra distance yet still have that confidence in the 3 wood for tight fairways where you need a nice accurate shot. 

Thanks for the feedback. I can work on my irons and pitching at home and still keep the ball on my property, but I'll have to go to the range to work on the driver (of course, I'll be labeled as one of those hackers who doesn't know how to properly practice).

 

I've definitely been guilty of a lot of the mistakes listed here. Not so much to be macho, but because I don't/didn't know any better. I usually play golf alone, and this forum is about the only place I talk (or type) about it. So a thread like this is very valuable. I'm playing this game to improve not to impress (not gonna happen anyway).

 

Some of the stuff I'm starting to figure out on my own:

 

Watch the pros to be entertained, not to emulate.

Controlled power, smooth swing gets as much distance as swinging for the fences.

Learn a swing that will be easy to repeat.

Instead of freaking out over a bad shot, look at it as an opportunity to learn how to make the next shot.

When in doubt about distance, go with the longer club/easier swing.

When in doubt about "threading the needle", lay up.

Just because one part of your game is strong doesn't mean you don't have to continue working on it.

 

Of course, knowledge is different than execution. Also, learning this game is an evolution. As a novice, what I think I know may be completely wrong.

post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

 

- What if the quick tip works?

 

That's why I also said "will solve all the ball striking issues" a2_wink.gif  Changing motor patterns takes work and patience.  Quick tips can be useful for "how do I stop shanking", "I'm slicing my driver", emergency stuff.  

post #23 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonMA1 View Post

Can someone please give me some insight.

 

Here's my problem, I can hit my 3 wood off the tee about as far as my driver and with a bit more accuracy - somewhere in the 200 - 220 yd range (going by the course markers not, gps). While that distance might get me to within a 3 or 5 wood of the green, I still use my driver because I want to improve my entire game as much as I do my score. My logic is that if I can at some point learn how to hit the driver correctly, the extra yards would allow me to use a shorter club for my second shot. So it's worth putting in the effort (along the penalty strokes from the errant drives) now. I don't really care about impressing anyone with the long ball, but there is bit of a battle between ego and common sense going on.

I'd recommend two things (1) getting a lesson or two (or more if needed) to see why you are not hitting your driver further than your 3-w. Although it is great to figure things out for yourself, it could be more economical (time and $) to spend an hour or two with a pro than days/weeks struggling to figure it out (assuming you do). (2) Get properly fit for your woods (as well as your irons). It could be that the head/shaft/combo aren't the best for your swing. Both of these together should yield the most benefit. JMO . . .

post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobtrumpet View Post

I'd recommend two things (1) getting a lesson or two (or more if needed) to see why you are not hitting your driver further than your 3-w. Although it is great to figure things out for yourself, it could be more economical (time and $) to spend an hour or two with a pro than days/weeks struggling to figure it out (assuming you do). (2) Get properly fit for your woods (as well as your irons). It could be that the head/shaft/combo aren't the best for your swing. Both of these together should yield the most benefit. JMO . . .

 

Good advice on the lesson(s) & club fitting. Thanks.

 

Maybe another one for the man up list is the "going alone" attitude when us novice players think we can figure it all out on our own.

post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post

After watching a lot of poor golfers on the course, and reading a lot of threads on this forum, I've discovered a lot of things that we novice/intermediate golfers do to "improve" our game, which are actually hurting us. And many of them stem from the innate desire to "man up."

I've started the conversation with this list of common errors related to male chauvinism. I will gladly admit - at one time or another, I have been guilty of most of these crimes myself. But now that I've personally benefited from curbing my libido, none of this bothers me anymore.
 


-Swinging way, way too hard.

 

-Spending all your time on the range perfecting your big drive, and none perfecting your chipping and putting.

 

-Dropping $500 on the latest driver, which will likely perform no better than a basic model.

 

-Buying any driver with a loft that is way too low (I've seen a lot of novices with 9's in the bag)


-Using a Pro-V1 when what you probably need is a decent 2-piece distance ball.


-Buying stiff shafts when regulars are probably more appropriate for your swing speed.

 

-Not wanting to convert lower irons to hybrids, because "hybrids are for wussies."
 


I'm sure there's more. Please, add to this list with your own "Viagara" moments, or ones you've seen others commit.

 

Another example is going for greens from 230+ yards, or course mangement in general

 

On the weekend I shot my best round ( 78 ) and my buddy accused me of playing old man golf because I laid up on all par 5s. I elected to lay up even if I was 200 yards out. It paid off, because I played the par 5s one under.

 

Sometimes you just gotta play smart, not bold.

post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kieran123 View Post

 

Another example is going for greens from 230+ yards, or course mangement in general

 

On the weekend I shot my best round ( 78 ) and my buddy accused me of playing old man golf because I laid up on all par 5s. I elected to lay up even if I was 200 yards out. It paid off, because I played the par 5s one under.

 

Sometimes you just gotta play smart, not bold.

Just out of curiosity, what did your buddy shoot?

post #27 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kieran123 View Post

 

Another example is going for greens from 230+ yards, or course mangement in general

 

On the weekend I shot my best round ( 78 ) and my buddy accused me of playing old man golf because I laid up on all par 5s. I elected to lay up even if I was 200 yards out. It paid off, because I played the par 5s one under.

 

Sometimes you just gotta play smart, not bold.

+100!

post #28 of 56

Mr. Shankstein has 150 yards to the pin.

The pin is in the middle of the green.

The green is 30 yards deep.

Mr. Shankstein stripes his 7 iron right in the center of the face.

Ball lands on front fringe, 15 yards short of pin.

Mr. Shankstein sees ball on front edge and says, "Yes, 7 iron is my 150 club."

7 iron is actually his 135 club.

Mr Shankstein trys new 7 iron at demo day.

Mr. Shankstein hits new iron on the toe.

Trackman says ball carried 128 yds.

Mr. Shankstein says, "Gee, I hit my own 7 iron 20 yards farther than this new one!"

Mr Shankstein plays the next day.

Mr Shankstein comes to 150 yd Par 3 with kidney shaped green.

Flagstick is back right, at 163 yds, unbeknownst to Mr Shankstein.

Water is guarding green front right.

Mr Shankstein goes for the flag.....

Later, Mr Shankstein has greenskeeper re-measure hole to double check yardage.

post #29 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

Just out of curiosity, what did your buddy shoot?

99

post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kieran123 View Post

99

Did you call him Gretzky for the rest of the day?

post #31 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by virtuoso View Post

Mr. Shankstein has 150 yards to the pin.
The pin is in the middle of the green.
The green is 30 yards deep.
Mr. Shankstein stripes his 7 iron right in the center of the face.
Ball lands on front fringe, 15 yards short of pin.
Mr. Shankstein sees ball on front edge and says, "Yes, 7 iron is my 150 club."
7 iron is actually his 135 club.
Mr Shankstein trys new 7 iron at demo day.
Mr. Shankstein hits new iron on the toe.
Trackman says ball carried 128 yds.
Mr. Shankstein says, "Gee, I hit my own 7 iron 20 yards farther than this new one!"
Mr Shankstein plays the next day.
Mr Shankstein comes to 150 yd Par 3 with kidney shaped green.
Flagstick is back right, at 163 yds, unbeknownst to Mr Shankstein.
Water is guarding green front right.
Mr Shankstein goes for the flag.....
Later, Mr Shankstein has greenskeeper re-measure hole to double check yardage.

Sounds like Mr. Shankenstein should spend his money on a gym membership rather than new clubs if he hits his 7i 135.
post #32 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundandFury View Post


Sounds like Mr. Shankenstein should spend his money on a gym membership rather than new clubs if he hits his 7i 135.

Nice. And you wonder why novice players try to swing out of their shoes.

post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonMA1 View Post

Nice. And you wonder why novice players try to swing out of their shoes.

It was a joke dude.
post #34 of 56

Mr Shankstein is 63 years old but has no idea why he has lost distance over the past 10 years.

He asks the club fitter if perhaps the shafts have worn out over time.

Maybe the shafts have lost their "kick".

post #35 of 56

SoundandFury - I know you were joking. I was just giving you $^%. If I came off as a jerk, I apologize.

post #36 of 56

One of the clubhouse guys was rolling around the course in his cart last year when I was about to try a risky shot between a couple trees to the green.  He watched silently as I blasted the ball into the first tree and let out some beautiful expletives.  Then he gave me the best advice that I have remembered ever since. "Remember, find the fairway first."

 

I never play a hazardous shot without remembering the Triple-F golden rule no matter how much I get heckled to take the risky shot.  I'm no pro and now I know it.

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