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Pre-Shot Routines - Page 4

Poll Results: How long is your typical pre-shot routine?

 
  • 56% (44)
    1-10 seconds
  • 37% (29)
    11-20 seconds
  • 6% (5)
    >20 seconds (Kevin NA)
78 Total Votes  
post #55 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Bellaire View Post

I would identify 'Assuming you are playing ready golf and you have identified and are at your ball, you are now "clear" to proceed with your shot.' as the later part of a preshot routine...The part of 'This doesn't include anything after your club making contact with the ball (this would be post-shot), or anything regarding driving/walking to your ball.' is where I would consider your preshot routine to start.  The problem is most people don't start until they are already 'clear' to hit, which according to me is when nobody is likely to be injured by your shot, not necessarily when you are the farthest from the pin(unless of course you are in a sanctioned event).  I like the analogy of the golfcourse itself is a 'think box' and the tee box is a 'play box'. 

 

I loath 5hr casual rounds...no reason for it...lots of reasons why it happens!  

It has become the commonly accepted period of time, known as the pre-shot routine, where a player is behind the ball with club in hand and is about to play their shot (i.e.: the time is ticking for a player that is ready to inbound the ball in the NBA, if you will accept that as a cross-platform example). 

When you hear announcers, Golf Channel segments, golf shows in general, discuss a pre-shot routine, they're talking about the waggles, the alignments, the "stare down", etc. They're not talking about the walk to the ball, the club selection, the discussion with the caddie, etc. Don't read too much into it and get overly critical.

post #56 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

It has become the commonly accepted period of time, known as the pre-shot routine, where a player is behind the ball with club in hand and is about to play their shot (i.e.: the time is ticking for a player that is ready to inbound the ball in the NBA, if you will accept that as a cross-platform example). 

When you hear announcers, Golf Channel segments, golf shows in general, discuss a pre-shot routine, they're talking about the waggles, the alignments, the "stare down", etc. They're not talking about the walk to the ball, the club selection, the discussion with the caddie, etc. Don't read too much into it and get overly critical.

I agree...just have seen, too many times, players who think this is where you start reading yardages and wind and are debating what shot shape to hit, then they start their 'preshot' routine.  While everyone else on the course/hole is standing around watching/waiting.  But I do beleive all analysis of your shot to come is considered a preshot routine.  From the moment you get the yardage or start starring at the hazards you don't want to hit into...just my two cents.

post #57 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Bellaire View Post

I agree...just have seen, too many times, players who think this is where you start reading yardages and wind and are debating what shot shape to hit, then they start their 'preshot' routine.  While everyone else on the course/hole is standing around watching/waiting.  But I do beleive all analysis of your shot to come is considered a preshot routine.  From the moment you get the yardage or start starring at the hazards you don't want to hit into...just my two cents.

Nope, you're right on track in my opinion. I just wanted to quote your post as an example to help better clarify the "pre-shot routine" to some other posters who seemed confused, or are refraining from posting.

post #58 of 74

I seem to remember Pelz distinguishing between a routine and a ritual.  I think to him, the routine included all of the information gathering steps, where the ritual started at "go time" and should be consistent and automatic.  The ritual is sort of the point where there's no turning back. I might have those backwards.

 

After the information gathering/decision making....

 

I take a few practice swings focusing on a particular feel, not trying to make the perfect swing.  Lately its been making sure my weight gets to the ball of my front foot vs the heel on my downswing.  Not necessarily full swings, and they're in fast succession.  I think under Pelz' definition, this is still routine.

 

Then the ritual.  Standing behind the ball I pick my line and take a deep breath, walk up, set up, look at up at the target, back down, waggle 2-3 times and swing.  

 

I just timed that by imagining each step and how long it takes and my backswing started at 11 seconds for the "ritual."  I would guess that the practice swings add 5 seconds, if you want to count those.  I usually wait until after the other player has hit to take my practice swings, so maybe they should count.  

 

So I guess that puts me at 11 or 16 seconds.

post #59 of 74
Thread Starter 

My question to the 1-10 second group is this:

Do you think that if you took more time to prepare your shot, you would be more consistent and better off as a result? If you took one more look down-line, took one extra practice swing, took one extra deep breath and moment to visualize your shot, do you think this could positively benefit your game?

I also see that there are only 3 Kevin NA emulators on-hand as well. Or at the least, 3 people who were brave enough to be honest!

For the 3 of you:

Do you think you take too much time? Do you think this can lead to second-guessing yourself, or possibly cause you to lose some confidence and momentum?

post #60 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

My question to the 1-10 second group is this:


Do you think that if you took more time to prepare your shot, you would be more consistent and better off as a result? If you took one more look down-line, took one extra practice swing, took one extra deep breath and moment to visualize your shot, do you think this could positively benefit your game?


I also see that there are only 3 Kevin NA emulators on-hand as well. Or at the least, 3 people who were brave enough to be honest!

For the 3 of you:


Do you think you take too much time? Do you think this can lead to second-guessing yourself, or possibly cause you to lose some confidence and momentum?

Nope. The longer I think the dumber I get. b2_tongue.gif
post #61 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Nope. The longer I think the dumber I get. b2_tongue.gif

 

The brain is vastly overrated as any kind of help in this silly game!   a3_biggrin.gif

post #62 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

The brain is vastly overrated as any kind of help in this silly game!   a3_biggrin.gif

Amen. That's why I'm trying to beat it into submission with Single Malt. If that doesn't work I may try a shovel.
post #63 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post

I seem to remember Pelz distinguishing between a routine and a ritual.  I think to him, the routine included all of the information gathering steps, where the ritual started at "go time" and should be consistent and automatic.  The ritual is sort of the point where there's no turning back. I might have those backwards.

 

After the information gathering/decision making....

 

I take a few practice swings focusing on a particular feel, not trying to make the perfect swing.  Lately its been making sure my weight gets to the ball of my front foot vs the heel on my downswing.  Not necessarily full swings, and they're in fast succession.  I think under Pelz' definition, this is still routine.

 

Then the ritual.  Standing behind the ball I pick my line and take a deep breath, walk up, set up, look at up at the target, back down, waggle 2-3 times and swing.  

 

I just timed that by imagining each step and how long it takes and my backswing started at 11 seconds for the "ritual."  I would guess that the practice swings add 5 seconds, if you want to count those.  I usually wait until after the other player has hit to take my practice swings, so maybe they should count.  

 

So I guess that puts me at 11 or 16 seconds.

 

Pelz is in his own peculiar world anyway, way off the mainstream, so what he says is mostly irrelevant to real world golf.  Obviously, if you are taking too much time at those preliminaries, then it doesn't matter how short your actual routine is, you will still be a slow player.  

 

If I wait until it's my turn to take 2 minutes to pace off my yardage, check the wind, gauge the slope, pick a club, test swing two or three times, and only then stepped behind the ball to pick my line, then I'm a slow player, and even a 10 second preshot routine from picking the line to hitting the ball isn't going to help that.  There are portions of what can be called preliminary steps which can be done partly or wholly before it's your turn to play.  If you lack the awareness to take as many of those steps as possible proactively, then you are guilty of unduly delaying play for your group, and for the players behind you.

post #64 of 74
Once I pull the the club I will stand 3 feet behind the ball with my body facing the target (perpendicular). I will take two 1/4 shots just to get the feel of impact with the ground. Then I point my club straight out at my intended target and follow it straight down to the ground till I see a loose impediment that is in front of my golf ball. Then I come up to address the ball making sure the club face is in line with the loose impediment I picked out and swing. All in all it takes anywhere from 10-15 seconds.
post #65 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquaguru View Post

All in all it takes anywhere from 10-15 seconds.

 

That seems optimistic.  I played 27 holes yesterday, the final 9 were twilight holes just for practice since the course was nearly empty.  So I tried to time myself a few times on my "pre-shot routine" which consists of no practice swings and simply standing behind the ball for alignment and then stepping up to address and swinging after getting the right thoughts in my head and relaxing.  Still took like 10+ seconds sometimes.  Sometimes less.  If I added practice swings in and more alignment mechanisms I'm sure it could go up to 25-30 seconds easily.

post #66 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

My question to the 1-10 second group is this:

Do you think that if you took more time to prepare your shot, you would be more consistent and better off as a result? If you took one more look down-line, took one extra practice swing, took one extra deep breath and moment to visualize your shot, do you think this could positively benefit your game?

I also see that there are only 3 Kevin NA emulators on-hand as well. Or at the least, 3 people who were brave enough to be honest!

For the 3 of you:

Do you think you take too much time? Do you think this can lead to second-guessing yourself, or possibly cause you to lose some confidence and momentum?

I selected the 1-10 seconds, so to respond to your question, no. I think we're getting into trouble with too much information. I'm an advocate of going with your instinct. Now I'm not saying be stubborn and go for it every time. But if I get an in-between-clubs yardage, I just take a quick note of the conditions, and pick one. For me, it's no different than answering a multiple choice question in which you are unsure of the correct answer. Instead of sitting there re-reading the question and choices for 5 minutes, I make my selection and move on. I believe I benefit from this mindset hugely over others. I almost never have regrets or beat myself up over bad shots. I made my decision and either it worked out or it didn't. Now on to the next shot...

 

As for one more look, one more moment, or extra practice swing. No to that as well. I've got my routine, I feel comfortable doing it. If I take too long over the ball or waggle one less or one more than usual, I quickly don't feel comfortable any more. 

post #67 of 74

I'm running with from when I pull the club from the bag and dropped myself in the 11-20 bracket.

 

Step behind the ball and get my target line, check my grip. maybe have a little 1/4 swing swoosh on the grass if they haven't been coming out great.

 

Walk around to address the ball. Double check club face is where I want it, offer up a small prayer and pull the trigger.

post #68 of 74

Timing how long it takes should begin when you have gotten to your ball and it is your turn to hit. 

I believe the USGA says for the first player, it should be 40 seconds and for all subsequent players it is either 20 or 30 seconds. Think maybe it is 20 but too lazy to look it up. 

While the first player is doing his thing, you can get prepared for your shot to some degree.

I had someone time me, as the first player to get to my ball (yep, short hitter).

To shoot the yardage with rangefinder, look at my GPS to get any additional info, throw up grass, pull out the club, stand behind the ball, move into position, waggle, waggle, pull the trigger...just under 30 seconds.  Well under the 40 seconds allowed.

If I am not first to hit, I have already looked at my GPS  while first guy is hitting.  I know the depth of the green so I know the + or - from center.

So I get to my ball, shoot with rangefinder, pull a club (already threw up grass when 1st player was hitting), stand behind the ball, move into position, waggle, waggle, pull the trigger...right at 20 seconds. 

 

The part that is pre-shot, standing behind the ball, moving into position, waggle, waggle (looking at my alignment while doing this)...that part is right at 10 to 11 seconds. 

 

40 seconds for first guy is very generous.  20 seconds for 2nd and subsequent guys...that is about right (but may be 30...again too lazy to look up).

 

The whole deal is shoot the breeze driving or walking up to the shot.  Shut up once it is time to hit.  Get down to business, then start the conversation once everyone is moving again.

post #69 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

Stand behind the ball to line up my spot.  Keeping my eye on that spot, I take my address and make the stroke.  No practice swing except on chips and pitches.  Typically 10 seconds on full shots, 15-20 on chips, and that is time from start til the ball is on the way.

My exact pre-shot routine except I take a practice swing on every shot. 

post #70 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickK View Post

While the first player is doing his thing, you can get prepared for your shot 

 

Unless you're playing with Sergio.

 

Bazinga!

post #71 of 74

A retired high school coach who has been a PGA teaching pro for several years tells his students about PGA - posture, grip, and alignment.

 

You work on these on the practice range, and then they should be pretty automatic when you play.

 

If you don't have a set pre-swing routine, it may be hard to get consistency in your shots since you "set up" a little different for each swing.

post #72 of 74

My "routine" starts when I'm behind the ball and preparing to address and swing. 

 

Most of my "aiming" is done before its even my turn to play so my start is pretty quick..just a last affirmation of my line of play.

 

I then step to the ball, align myself with a close distance target on my line, and swing. 

 

The only time i take a practice swing is for half-swings and that pre-shot routine will take a little longer, maybe 20 seconds.

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