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Good Grips!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I bought cobra amp irons a few months back. They came with the factory lamkin grips on them which i really don't like. I'd like to swap them out for some good grips at a reasonable price. Any ideas?

post #2 of 24

Golf Pride Multicompound.

 

Have had them for years and still consider them the best. Picked them when I got my Mizunos with the matching Mizuno logo and black and blue colors. 

post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 

Ok thanks. I'll check into those. Also, how difficult is it to change out grips yourself? I don't think I can justify spending $5 a club if it's something relatively easy.

post #4 of 24

Very easy. Just need grip tape and some form of sticky lubricant. I've heard of people using hair spray (I used to use that on my dirtbike grips) and I've also heard of people using just soapy water. We would use a box cutter to cut off the old grips. Then measure off the length of tape leaving about an inch past the top of the shaft. Would fold in the excess into the top of the shaft opening. Then put some of the spray in the grip, making sure to plug the hole at the end (with a tee or your thumb) and then I would pour that spray onto the tape. I would then keep the clubhead in between my feet to ensure I put the grip on square. 

 

It's slightly difficult to describe, but once you see it done or have done it yourself, it's really easy. 

post #5 of 24

Grip fitting is really simple and easy, just takes a bit of patience. Check out golfclubshaftreview.com They have a grip fitting guide on their grip size page.

Hope this helps

post #6 of 24

I put Golf Pride New Decade midsize grips on all my clubs.  Golf Pride has a fitting guide on their web site that will help you figure out the right size grips.  I find the midsize grips to be much more comfortable and to help with what I presume is the early stages of arthritis.  I think I'm hitting the ball better because of the change.  There are plenty of instructions for installing grips on the web.  Very easy!  If your shafts are graphite be careful not to nick them, but with newer clubs the old grips and tape should come off pretty easy, just have a bit of patience. 

post #7 of 24

please don't pick out grips based on what people say on the internet.

 

Grips are all very different.  What works for one person, doesn't necessarily work for another.  As an example, last year I played a Karma velvet grip (generic GP Tour velvet) they cost around $1 a piece, so while they didn't last as long as the real GP grips, they were so cheap that I could swap them out twice a year and always have clean tacky grips.  I have friends that swear by Winn grips because they prefer the softer feel.  Others really like the New Decade or multi compound grips.  Also, grips come in lots of colors and variety, and you might find a grip that you like based purely on color (school colors, patriotic, etc.) 

 

You should go to a golf store and put all of the different grips in your hand and see which one feels the best to you.  Any golf store should be able to help you determine the standard size for you.  But remember that grip size has an effect on the swing.  What I mean is that grip size isn't something that you should just statically fit.  Ideally you should try several different grip sizes on a similar club and feel the effects of different size grips (and notice any difference in ball flight as a result)

 

Like the one user said, having a larger grip might mean you grip the club lighter allowing you to release better through the ball.  It could also have the opposite effects delaying the release. 

 

As for swapping grips, on steel shafts it is stupid easy, a box cutter, and a grip kit (pre measured tape, a small bottle of solveant, and a holder thing to hold it in a household vise) along with a quick youtube search will show you lots of results on how to change grips.  You have to be careful with graphite shafts because the fibers of graphite can be damaged when running the knife across the shaft, so it is advised to use a hook handled blade (and even be careful with that)

 

If you look at grips like the PURE grips that are advertised on this site, they can be put on with compressed air and require no tape at all (stupid easy to replace if you have a tool air compressor)

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBrew View Post

Golf Pride Multicompound.

 

Have had them for years and still consider them the best. Picked them when I got my Mizunos with the matching Mizuno logo and black and blue colors. 

 

The only downside I've seen with the GP Multicompound grips is the cord tears my glove to pieces.  I went away from them, for that reason.  I recently have been playing the Lamkin 3-Gen grips, they're firm and tacky.

post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethmorris View Post

Ok thanks. I'll check into those. Also, how difficult is it to change out grips yourself? I don't think I can justify spending $5 a club if it's something relatively easy.


Might be relatively easy, but you just splurged for new irons anyway right? I mean if you're just doing a standard 8 clubs * $5? I'd shell out the $40 and make sure it's done right, especially if the grips you choose have any kind of alignment tool on them, wouldn't want that on twisted slightly or something.

 

Maybe I'm just paranoid about messing with my clubs myself though..

post #10 of 24

Plenty of videos on "youtube" on replacing your worn grips.  Really easy.  If your clubs have graphite shafts, to the hardware store and pick up some curved blades

for your utility knife before you start.

post #11 of 24

I have Golf Pride Niion gips, but if you don't like the lamkins you probably don't like these also. 

Think the multi compound will be a good fit.

As for changing them yourself, it's not all that difficult at all.

I always do it this way:

First cut off the old grips I just use a stanley carpet knife for that.

remove the old tape ( if it's going hard heat it up a bit )

Than place a 2" wide double sided tape on the shaft make sure the tape is about 3/4 inch over the shaft en fold it in the shaft.

Get the new grip and do some white spirit in it ( make sure to close the hole at the end with a tee or something )

shake it so the whole grip is wet from white spirit. 

Than throw the white spirit over the tape on the shaft, now the grip will slide over the tape easy.

make sure the grip is aligned proper, so the golf pride logo on the grip should be inline with your club head.

Let the white spirit dry out for about 2 hours before use. And your good to go. 

post #12 of 24

To negate the sticky tape prior to slipping on the grip some kind of solvent is needed. The solvent covers the sticky, then evaporatates, leaving the stickiness behind doing its job of sticking the grip to the shaft. Many solvents do the job. I buy common lighter fluid, like used in Zippo lighters, becoz the can is small, has a drip nozzle and is cheap. All such solvents will burn readily so use care. 

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethmorris View Post

Ok thanks. I'll check into those. Also, how difficult is it to change out grips yourself? I don't think I can justify spending $5 a club if it's something relatively easy.

I believe Golf Galaxy and Golf Smith only charge $2.00 per club + the cost of the grip. For Golf Pride Multi-Compound New Decade grips, which typically run about $9.00 at both, you're looking at approximately $12.50 per club. I've had these for 1 full season and I'm into my second now and I see very little to no wear on mine, so definitely worth the cost. $2.00 definitely is worth me not having to hassle and fuss with tape and everything as well since I typically walk around the store and pick up a few other items while I'm waiting.

post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the ideas folks. I don't have a golf shop within a 2 hr drive of me. There's a local guy who charges $5 a grip, but I think I'll just change them out myself based on how easy it seems. 

post #15 of 24
Do you live more than 2 hours from a course? They certainly should be able to put them on for a nominal fee. Unless your "pro" is a pro in name only, that is a basic skill that they should know and take care of for their customers.
post #16 of 24

One of the great advantages of  DIY on the grips is the easy ability to change the color as you like. I have a driver with a pink grip, golden shaft and jumbo black head-looks powerful.  But if soon i want a black grip to match the head, bingo; overnight i can switch out. Disadvantage is that he pink grip is gone forever, torn to shreds. I have heard of special intact grip removers in the big shops which may let you reuse the grip but not for me. 

post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayG View Post

Do you live more than 2 hours from a course? They certainly should be able to put them on for a nominal fee. Unless your "pro" is a pro in name only, that is a basic skill that they should know and take care of for their customers.

No my course is a crap hole in the middle of nowhere. The conditions are horrible and the "pro shop" only has a couple of cases of golf balls and some tees. They don't have a pro here. I only play here because there's nothing else within a hour's drive.

post #18 of 24

If you do decide to go with Golf Pride NDMC's DO NOT BUY on eBay... 95% of the NDMC's on there are fake. 

 

I would DIY... just make sure you have the correct tools before hand or else you'll ruin the grips. 

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