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TaylorMade Prepping to produce Non-Conforming Clubs - Page 4

post #55 of 88

I also can't see how TM can benefit from making non conforming clubs.  Not sure what type of market is there for it.  I mean, if they create a driver that can hit 30 yds longer because of a hot face, then yes, but we all know that's not going to happen.  The advantage is marginal at best.  You can only make the faces so thin before it caves in.  And even now, TM isn't known for having the most durable products out there. 

 

500cc, even 600cc did exist for a time right before they imposed the 460cc limit.  And even during then, not too many people were interested.  It just got so big where it actually became harder to swing it and yes, to a point where aerodynamics came into play.  It was no longer confidence inspiring thinking on how to swing a stick with a balloon on the end. 

 

So really not sure why TM would even suggest such an idea cause they know very well there is a high chance it flopping.  Like one of the posters said, sounds more like an ego thing.

post #56 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuffs View Post

I also can't see how TM can benefit from making non conforming clubs.  Not sure what type of market is there for it.  I mean, if they create a driver that can hit 30 yds longer because of a hot face, then yes, but we all know that's not going to happen.  The advantage is marginal at best.  You can only make the faces so thin before it caves in.  And even now, TM isn't known for having the most durable products out there. 

500cc, even 600cc did exist for a time right before they imposed the 460cc limit.  And even during then, not too many people were interested.  It just got so big where it actually became harder to swing it and yes, to a point where aerodynamics came into play.  It was no longer confidence inspiring thinking on how to swing a stick with a balloon on the end. 

So really not sure why TM would even suggest such an idea cause they know very well there is a high chance it flopping.  Like one of the posters said, sounds more like an ego thing.

Lol I remember those, I could actually feel the air pushing against the club face...
post #57 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuffs View Post

I also can't see how TM can benefit from making non conforming clubs.  Not sure what type of market is there for it.  I mean, if they create a driver that can hit 30 yds longer because of a hot face, then yes, but we all know that's not going to happen.  The advantage is marginal at best.  You can only make the faces so thin before it caves in.  And even now, TM isn't known for having the most durable products out there. 

 

500cc, even 600cc did exist for a time right before they imposed the 460cc limit.  And even during then, not too many people were interested.  It just got so big where it actually became harder to swing it and yes, to a point where aerodynamics came into play.  It was no longer confidence inspiring thinking on how to swing a stick with a balloon on the end. 

 

So really not sure why TM would even suggest such an idea cause they know very well there is a high chance it flopping.  Like one of the posters said, sounds more like an ego thing.

I don't think their target market for these product would be serious golfers who maintain a handicap.  I think they would target friends and family of serious golfers, casual golfers who want to increase their enjoyment of the game and don't care about submitting a score for handicap. 

 

I could see my son wanting a driver that allows him to hit the ball further or some other club that makes the game easier given he only plays a few times a year. 

post #58 of 88

Let's not forget that until clubs are actually released, it could just be Mark King throwing a hissy fit and/or saying stupid things. It might never happen.

post #59 of 88

Can anyone give me a definition of "bunny slope" as it relates to golf. The closest this thread comes to it is suggesting bunny slope is a very easy, short 9 hole course. If that's so, what does that have to do with non-conforming clubs.

 

BTW, non-conforming clubs will probably have a huge market, there are a lot of people who fall for gimmicks all the time, especially in the world of golf. The percentage of golfers who will commit themselves to the point of regularly visiting and posting to a golf forum are probably very small in comparison to all recreational golfers out there, so of course on TST, the idea is not going to go over big.

post #60 of 88

I'm obviously missing something relative to the long putter controversy. I thought that the governing bodies of golf were finally enforcing the concept of the free swing of the club as the rule.

 

Guys like Kuchar that use a longer putter, but still move/swing both hands during the unanchored stroke will be allowed to continue unaffected by the ruling. The equipment is still legal; it's the creation of the pivot that's being disallowed. I've never understood how they were used in that manner in competition all this time. It's not a swing...it's an assisted pendulum.

 

The only thing that I ever viewed as vaguely positive about them is that it makes it easier to find in your bag.

post #61 of 88

Screw it. As long as they're marked as non-conforming/training clubs and they're not used in club competitions or handicap rounds, then let someone learn the game however they want to. I think of it as being similar to the PerfectShot arm gimmick that came out when I was in high school. It teaches you the ideal line to shoot a basketball, but no one is going to use it in a game.

 

Let people have their bunnyslope clubs and learn the game, then graduate to some real sticks.

post #62 of 88

Not sure if there is a real market for non-conforming clubs.  Callaway's ERC driver wasn't exactly a success story, even though Arnold Palmer liked it.

If the clubs are cheap, maybe some will buy them as a novelty.  I can't see many golfers dropping serious cash on such equipment.   

post #63 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

I doubt they would mark them as non-conforming (since products like Hammer don't either) but would just have a separate product line for them.  

 

Separate product line...  TraylorMade :)

post #64 of 88

The non conforming heads are out there, and not easy to spot.  I have a friend who is an amateur clubmaker. He put a nonconforming TM japanese issue head on a 52" shaft for us to play around with.  None of us have taken it to a golf course yet, but one of my buddies got booted from a local range for hitting too many balls out through the back fence.  Clearly, the shaft is easy to spot.....  But the high COR head is not marked in ANY way.  Just an older model TM driver head.  And I fear that these 'new' non conforming clubs will be hard to spot, also.

post #65 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by tristanhilton85 View Post

Eh... kind of disappointed by this. What's the point of playing the game if your going to do it with clubs that are against the rules. Obviously a lot of people don't care but, still, I don't like it.

It seems like TaylorMade is just pressing the issue and trying to get under the skin of the USGA.

The "bunny slope" idea is somewhat appealing if the game is going to appeal to more people.

In archery, there are recurve and compound bow divisions for tournaments.

The compound bow is very expensive and, generally, the more money you pour into it the better your performance.

In recurve archery, there is very little that actually changed, due to FITA regulations. It is a more pure sport. This is why recurve is an Olympic sport and compound archery is not.

However, there are two divisions, or more, where recurve has been more or less skill limited, and in the compound divisions equipment limited.

The top 100 archers in recurve division hit a quarter sized target About 98% of the time and the top 100 compound archers hit a dime size target more than 99.5% of the time with really expensive equipment.

Also, compound people practice 1/5 the amount, of their recurve counterparts.

In this case, maybe having more divisions is good for the sport? Handicaps might be adjusted, or something?
post #66 of 88

I prefer to think of them more as "training wheel" clubs than "bunny slopes".

post #67 of 88

I would assume these types of clubs would be a stepping stone like most of us use game improvement irons as a stepping stone. Eventually, as your game progresses you move to more traditional clubs. I know I want to eventually move to blade irons if I ever get consistent enough with my swing and ball striking to allow for it. I actually feel like the ridiculously sized heads of drivers are worse than someone using an anchored putting stroke.

post #68 of 88

The real deal is they got all the stuff in from china and it was non conforming stuff. soooooooooooooooooooooo we will just sell it because they can't send it back,,,

post #69 of 88

In other news:

-Nike manufactures "bunny slope" basketball shoes with tiny pogo sticks glued to the bottom of each one.

-Head Tennis attaches laser sights to their new "bunny slope" racquet collection.

-Bauer Hockey sells 6'x4' piece of sheet metal with a handle attached to it for beginning goaltenders.

-UnderArmour now making wide receiver gloves that automatically excrete industrial grade adhesives when exposed to pigskin.

 



You know the old saying... "If you can't beat 'em, cheat."

post #70 of 88

There are already plenty f non conforming clubs out there. They are all well marked as such so that they can't be missed. I dunno what TM's will look like, bu why should anyone care as long as nobody is using them foranything but their own enjoyment.

post #71 of 88
I'm in favour of this. How many folk here have wondered how the XR-03 or XR-05 would compare if it was still in production... imagne XR-11S Or XR-RBZ Yeah, that gives me a smile. Also look at the Callaway McDaddy Grooved wedges. It's a sad day when these are no longer allowed in the amateurs bag because nothing makes you smile like a wedge that bites when the owner barks. All in all I'm excited.
post #72 of 88

I have two thoughts.  

 

First, I don't see this as a problem for the players who aren't interested in it.  I play in rec softball leagues and they limit how hot a bat can be.  Bats are made that exceed the limit and some bats, though legal when made, once "broken in" become hotter to the point that they are illegal.  The ASA puts out a list of banned bats and umpires check the bats before a game.  It really isn't any different than the change to the groove rules--some clubs will exist that are illegal.  

 

Second, I don't see a market for it.  I agree that generally, things that make the game easier could find a market, and maybe belly putters are one of those things.  But if you're in the category of people looking for help through illegal clubs, you're probably a terrible golfer.  Box grooves and bigger driver heads aren't going to make any difference.  Maybe belly putters.  But if that's all we're talking about then nobody should care.  Its not like you're going to get cheated by a guy who anchors without you knowing.  

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