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A cure for slow play - Page 5

post #73 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

It is easy to see the distance, but are the fast golfers going to be any happier with their round taking 5 hours if they are behind a course full of poor to average golfers that are playing ready golf and doing the other things to improve pace of play. 

 

As for the right tee boxes I'm 100% in agreement with you, but I don't know any males that will voluntarily play from the ladies or senior tees, which means the courses have to educate and/or enforce the behavior. 

Honestly I don't see it. If someone is genuinely playing ready golf there's little chance to be slow even if they're playing bad. The slow people I see do really strange things on the course. Examples are everyone in the group looking for one errant ball at a time. In some instances not even in the order of how far out the balls could be. I've recently had people driving back towards me in carts after moving much further down the fairway. I've seen people park carts and walk 50+ yards away from them when it's not path only. I see people doing the Tin Cup thing, just saw this last weekend at my parents club. A member with 3 guests, several times two of them hit ball after ball. One guy hit 3 into a lake and then the tried to retrieve the balls. Just silly stuff.

 

I hate to admit this but here goes. Last night after playing some good golf I hit 2 OB on #9. The 3rd was no prize either but it was in play, in all it took me 11 freakin' strokes , counting penalties, to get it in the hole. It was real ugly. But I'll bet it didn't take me 5-6 minutes to complete the hole, I was alone. I still had to wait on the guy in front to clear the green.  Had I been playing with others aside from having to hit 3 balls from the tee it wouldn't have delayed them much. Even if they'd done the same thing it wouldn't have added much to our time on that hole. What's it take, couple of seconds to hit a ball? I spent a little time looking on the outside chance one landed on the favorable side of the white stakes but as soon as I got to the area it didn't take much to determine not only is there OB there but a ditch. I walked maybe 10 yds through weeds before getting back into the cart and driving to the 3rd ball, there was no doubt the balls made it OB. The shots were so bad I had no idea that part of the course was even there. Good news was I still managed a 46 out of it, was sitting at 35 through 8.

 

I'm not suggesting guys move up that far. The people I'm referring to play all the way back when there two sets of mens tees in front of that. We have a couple of short par 4's. I get stuck behind guys playing the tips that can't hit it past the 150 marker on a 317 yd hole with a driver because 9 of 10 are big weak slices that go nowhere. It's BS.


Edited by Dave2512 - 6/1/13 at 2:35pm
post #74 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post

Honestly I don't see it. If someone is genuinely playing ready golf there's little chance to be slow even if they're playing bad. The slow people I see do really strange things on the course. Examples are everyone in the group looking for one errant ball at a time. In some instances not even in the order of how far out the balls could be. I've recently had people driving back towards me in carts after moving much further down the fairway. I've seen people park carts and walk 50+ yards away from them when it's not path only. I see people doing the Tin Cup thing, just saw this last weekend at my parents club. A member with 3 guests, several times two of them hit ball after ball. One guy hit 3 into a lake and then the tried to retrieve the balls. Just silly stuff.

 

I hate to admit this but here goes. Last night after playing some good golf I hit 2 OB on #9. The 3rd was no prize either but it was in play, in all it took me 11 freakin' strokes , counting penalties, to get it in the hole. It was real ugly. But I'll bet it didn't take me 5-6 minutes to complete the hole, I was alone. I still had to wait on the guy in front to clear the green.  Had I been playing with others aside from having to hit 3 balls from the tee it wouldn't have delayed them much. Even if they'd done the same thing it wouldn't have added much to our time on that hole. What's it take, couple of seconds to hit a ball? I spent a little time looking on the outside chance one landed on the favorable side of the white stakes but as soon as I got to the area it didn't take much to determine not only is there OB there but a ditch. I walked maybe 10 yds through weeds before getting back into the cart and driving to the 3rd ball, there was no doubt the balls made it OB. The shots were so bad I had no idea that part of the course was even there. Good news was I still managed a 46 out of it, was sitting at 35 through 8.

 

I'm not suggesting guys move up that far. The people I'm referring to play all the way back when there two sets of mens tees in front of that. We have a couple of short par 4's. I get stuck behind guys playing the tips that can't hit it past the 150 marker on a 317 yd hole with a driver because 9 of 10 are big weak slices that go nowhere. It's BS.

 

I still think that the cure for slow play is to play better.  My last two 18's were completed in 2:15 and 2:45.  On one par 3 I hit the ball to about 10 feet and two putted.  I am pretty sure the hole took me 2-3 minutes total to complete if that.  I hit almost every fairway on my 2:15 round so there was no ball searching.  If you are constantly finding the rough and having to search for balls that time adds up.

 

I've seen many posts about how I shot 105 in 3:xx hours so bad play does not equal slow play.  105 is not bad, that is less than a 6 per hole.  Most of the people that I see causing the slow play are shooting constant 7s and 8s.  Ready golf will not solve the slow play that results from taking 150+ strokes. 

post #75 of 135

If someone is playing a regulation course and taking more than 120 strokes, they don't really need to be out there playing..especially not during busy portions of the day.  Go play at twilight until you get better or find an easier course to play until you improve a little bit.

 

Heck, play two putt max if you MUST play a challenging course for your skill level.  Play best ball off the tee if you're playing with someone better than you.

post #76 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paradox View Post

If someone is playing a regulation course and taking more than 120 strokes, they don't really need to be out there playing..especially not during busy portions of the day.  Go play at twilight until you get better or find an easier course to play until you improve a little bit.

 

Heck, play two putt max if you MUST play a challenging course for your skill level.  Play best ball off the tee if you're playing with someone better than you.

"If you suck, don't play and try to get better. Just give up so that the game will die due to having no new players"

post #77 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsu_paintballer View Post

"If you suck, don't play and try to get better. Just give up so that the game will die due to having no new players"

You can play and try to get better (and have fun doing it) without playing every hole completely out. Play match play or if you are playing just for fun have the decency to pick up a bad shot and carry it up to where the rest of the group is and play from there.

 

Heck, when I first started I always played with fairly good golfers and we played match play for $1 a hole with no ties and no carry-overs. The most it could cost me was $18 dollars and even that was never going to happen because people were going to tie some holes. Even though I seldom went home as the winner I did win my share of holes in between triple bogies.

 

Keeping score throughout the round and playing out every shot makes no sense when that score is going to be a 140.

 

THAT would drive me out of the game.

post #78 of 135

We have a senior golfers league at our club that play twice a week.  For the most part, members move along at a fair pace, but, some these guys are octogenarians.  Some may have dementia, or

worse, so it can be extremely frustrating. One guy has an absurd routine before every shot that goes beyond practice swings and take seemingly forever.  Compound this routine by taking twelve stokes on a par four, and you can imagine how frustrating this is.  Another guy simply spaces out, and has to be reminded when it his turn, etc.

 

What can we do?  We are an inclusive group and do not want to exclude any member who wants to play.  I wish there was a solution, but so far at least, none has surfaced.

 

I have seen younger, better golfers, however, that treat every shot, or put, as if it was for the win at the U.S. Open, and that can be just a frustrating.

post #79 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by boston blackie View Post

We have a senior golfers league at our club that play twice a week.  For the most part, members move along at a fair pace, but, some these guys are octogenarians.  Some may have dementia, or

worse, so it can be extremely frustrating. One guy has an absurd routine before every shot that goes beyond practice swings and take seemingly forever.  Compound this routine by taking twelve stokes on a par four, and you can imagine how frustrating this is.  Another guy simply spaces out, and has to be reminded when it his turn, etc.

 

What can we do?  We are an inclusive group and do not want to exclude any member who wants to play.  I wish there was a solution, but so far at least, none has surfaced.

 

I have seen younger, better golfers, however, that treat every shot, or put, as if it was for the win at the U.S. Open, and that can be just a frustrating.

I've never had to deal with that but (right or wrong) I would cut octogenarians some slack. I just hope I'm still playing at that age. If it was bad I would try to play my golf around their tee times if possible.

 

I used to play in a money game of mostly seniors but maybe not quite that old and they were actually pretty good and it was always an even match with them playing from the forward tees and me playing from the tips.

 

The only slightly aggravating thing about them was that they had no idea where anybody was except them. If I hit a bad tee shot by the time I got to my ball chances were that they were going to be up ahead of me and right in the middle of the fairway, right where I needed to hit the ball.

 

One day on a par five I hit a 4 iron second shot to 2 feet from the pin. After they all putted out their par putts I tapped in my eagle. One of them asked me if that was a par and I said no it was an eagle. He yelled "EAGLE?" It was funny because they had no clue.

post #80 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsu_paintballer View Post

"If you suck, don't play and try to get better. Just give up so that the game will die due to having no new players"

 

 

where in my post did I even come close to saying "just give up and don't play"?

post #81 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paradox View Post

If someone is playing a regulation course and taking more than 120 strokes, they don't really need to be out there playing..especially not during busy portions of the day.  Go play at twilight until you get better or find an easier course to play until you improve a little bit.

 

Heck, play two putt max if you MUST play a challenging course for your skill level.  Play best ball off the tee if you're playing with someone better than you.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paradox View Post

where in my post did I even come close to saying "just give up and don't play"?

You don't say give up, but you want to restrict when they play and how they play so not to interfere with your round.   Maybe people that tend to drive slower than the speed limit could restrict their driving times to between 2 am - 5am as well. 

 

It would be interesting to have someone that works at a public or muni course provide some statistics on the number of golfers that shoot over 100 versus below 100.  I'd guess that the majority shoot over 100. 

post #82 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by walk18 View Post

COURSE HANDICAP

MAXIMUM NUMBER ON ANY HOLE
9 or less Double Bogey
10 through 19 7
20 through 29 8
30 through 39 9
40 or more 10

Here is how ESC works for those wondering. If more people use it, it would probably help pace of play.


You don't use ESC while you are playing.  It's just used for posting scores to your handicap.

 

For example, I blew up a par five yesterday.  I sliced a drive into the woods, pitched out of the woods leaving my self a tree right in my way.  I thought I was far enough back that I could get my 2 hybrid around it for a shot at the green in three.  I was wrong, it hit the tree and bounced back into the woods.  Long story short, I'm hitting my 7th shot about 85 yards out which I skull because I so pissed from the previous on goings of this hole.  I end up on the fringe about 50 feet from the pin and hitting 8.  I'm not picking up here nor should I.  I make terrible chip and then two put for an awesome 10!  It goes on my scorecard as a 10 and I put a note near the total score that says -3.  So, when the round was over I added up my score and it was an 87.  Then when I went into the clubhouse to enter my score on the USGA computer I had to subtract 3 from my score for that blow up hole.  So what was reported was an 84.

 

When my friends and I started playing golf, we played the double the hole rule.  If you're on a par four and reached 8 strokes you picked up your ball and moved to the next hole.  So when you are starting out that's probably a good rule of thumb.

post #83 of 135

I would guess quite a few do run it over 100 but I don't see many people doing what's described here. More than the number of strokes is how it happened. Which I why I think new golfers, particularly men should shorten the course.

post #84 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Man View Post

You don't use ESC while you are playing.  It's just used for posting scores to your handicap.

 

If you're not actually competing, there's no harm or foul or any problem with picking up when you hit ESC.

post #85 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by flintcreek6412 View Post
 Why pull pins on the green? 

 

^^^ This concept (putting while pin still in place) would save a lot of time around the green.

 

So many times I have been on the green and some 50-80 feet away from hole and had to wait while someone else was still trying to get onto the green. The someone else is usually just a golfer who is having a bit of a tough time on a given hole.

Many times, in an effort to speed up play, I have played my lag putt while the pin is in the hole.

Yes, I know someone else in the group could pull the pin for this shot, but this action would take away from their putt preparation routine....so was any time saved??

 

This is one of many rules that could be changed in an attempt too speed up play.

Off Topic... Most people seem to think the person not on the green always goes first even if that person is not the furthest from the hole.

post #86 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

If you're not actually competing, there's no harm or foul or any problem with picking up when you hit ESC.

Just don't start talking smack about your score at the 19th.a2_wink.gif

 

I got a buddy who frequently picks up and mumbles something vague about "maxing out", which is fine, except that he'll compare scores over beers later. d2_doh.gif

post #87 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by scv76 View Post

^^^ This concept (putting while pin still in place) would save a lot of time around the green.

 

So many times I have been on the green and some 50-80 feet away from hole and had to wait while someone else was still trying to get onto the green. The someone else is usually just a golfer who is having a bit of a tough time on a given hole.

Many times, in an effort to speed up play, I have played my lag putt while the pin is in the hole.

Yes, I know someone else in the group could pull the pin for this shot, but this action would take away from their putt preparation routine....so was any time saved??

 

This is one of many rules that could be changed in an attempt too speed up play.

Off Topic... Most people seem to think the person not on the green always goes first even if that person is not the furthest from the hole.

I, for one, NEVER pull the pin when I'm playing by myself. 

post #88 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

 

You don't say give up, but you want to restrict when they play and how they play so not to interfere with your round.   Maybe people that tend to drive slower than the speed limit could restrict their driving times to between 2 am - 5am as well. 

 

It would be interesting to have someone that works at a public or muni course provide some statistics on the number of golfers that shoot over 100 versus below 100.  I'd guess that the majority shoot over 100. 

 

 

I never said it interfered with my round, either.  But alas, we jump to extreme analogies. 

 

My point was that if you're taking 120+ strokes...you shouldn't even be worried with what you're shooting and have no problem picking up when you've obviously used up a bit of time on a particular hole.  Playing an easier course would make the game more enjoyable for said golfer and also allow them to improve without people beating down their backs for an entire round.  I don't have any delusions about people not being ALLOWED to play..but I would like for everyone who picks up golf to be able to enjoy it and speaking from my own personality..it wouldn't be fun if I were struggling and I felt like someone was also constantly watching.

post #89 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by scv76 View Post

^^^ This concept (putting while pin still in place) would save a lot of time around the green.

 

So many times I have been on the green and some 50-80 feet away from hole and had to wait while someone else was still trying to get onto the green. The someone else is usually just a golfer who is having a bit of a tough time on a given hole.

Many times, in an effort to speed up play, I have played my lag putt while the pin is in the hole.

Yes, I know someone else in the group could pull the pin for this shot, but this action would take away from their putt preparation routine....so was any time saved??

 

This is one of many rules that could be changed in an attempt too speed up play.

Off Topic... Most people seem to think the person not on the green always goes first even if that person is not the furthest from the hole.

 

Lets look at this, lets say the closest guy to the pin is 30 feet away. That's pretty far away for the shortest putt in a four some. But average walking speed is about 3.0 mph, or 4.4 feet per second. That means, for the closest person to walk 60 feet pull the pin and walk back, your looking at 15-20 seconds, or 4.5 minutes over 18 holes? Not a good place to make up time.

post #90 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

If you're not actually competing, there's no harm or foul or any problem with picking up when you hit ESC.


True.  I was just trying to state that ESC is used for handicapping purposes, it's wasn't intended to be used for letting you know when to pick up your ball.

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