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update my rinky dink set or start over?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I have only been playing golf for a few months but I love it. My buddy gave me a set of ram clubs that are probably close to ten years old and they were a set from target. I destroyed the driver and bought a used ping to get me through the year and until I hopefully find a consistent swing. While I was talking to the fitter I asked about what club he would upgrade next. He advised me that instead of upgrading a piece at a time he would recommend a "transitional" set and pointed me to the Adams tight lies set. They seem to be pretty reasonably priced with good reviews. Would you update piece by piece or go with a complete set? Thanks!
post #2 of 23
Since you have been only golfing for a few months I would get the Adams set until your game gets to be really good. Then, you should start upgrading piece by piece.
post #3 of 23

Id just keep the Ram set.  Learn how to hit those properly and then worry about upgrading piece by piece.

post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
I forgot to mention that I plan to play the summer/fall with what I have and possibly make a move this winter.
post #5 of 23
If you made the effort to see a fitter and he looked at your swing and gave you his professional advice, I'd take it.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
I told him what I had through and he agreed that being play the rest of the year with what I have and try to find some consistency in my swing then move to an intermediate set (Adams tight lies) and upgrade when needed down the road. When you buy a set like The tight lies I have noticed yo yo III cannot buy the clubs that are in the set separately does that indicate inferior quality?
post #7 of 23
I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "I have noticed yo yo III", but: no. It's doesn't mean a set is of inferior quality just because you can't buy individual clubs (and usually you can, somewhere, btw). Adams is a well respected company whose clubs are played from novice up through sponsored touring pros. If you get a set of them, you are not getting "inferior quality".

You've only been playing a few months, right? Don't over-think equipment at this point. I think you're doing the right thing by concentrating on your swing first - kudos. You gonna take lessons?
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
I actually just spoke to a pro that does lessons that I work with and have spoke to other area golfers that think be very highly of him and his lessons so Yes that is in the very near future! Thanks for your comments and sorry for the spelling I downloaded a new keyboard on my phone and the autocorrect does not work that well to begin with and really does not agree with this forum! I guess I should proofread more!
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Yeah yo yo lll was supposed to be you!
post #10 of 23
If you want to start upgrading clubs my best advice is to get a new putter and get it fitted. As you get better your swing will most likely change buy your putter swing will most likely stay the same. I did that last year and its the best $ I've ever spent on a club.
post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
I was thinking that but dont even know where to start with a putter!
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by blaylock6502 View Post

I was thinking that but dont even know where to start with a putter!


My advice for a putter is, don't listen to anyone about which putter to buy. Even more so than other parts of Golf, putting is about what YOU like. It's all about how good it feels to you. It could be a $25 walmart putter or a $300 Never Compromise Gambler. Just get to a Golf store that has a putting green and try different kinds of putters.

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoalsAndPar View Post

My advice for a putter is, don't listen to anyone about which putter to buy. Even more so than other parts of Golf, putting is about what YOU like.

 

I disagree.

 

I think a putter is about finding a club that performs. For a putter, that means a club that:

  1. you can align properly
  2. you can control distances properly

 

That's why I promote and believe that every golfer who is serious enough to spend $400 (albeit just once) on a putter should find an Edel fitter and be fit for a putter that they are basically guaranteed to like because it performs.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

I disagree.

 

I think a putter is about finding a club that performs. For a putter, that means a club that:

  1. you can align properly
  2. you can control distances properly

 

That's why I promote and believe that every golfer who is serious enough to spend $400 (albeit just once) on a putter should find an Edel fitter and be fit for a putter that they are basically guaranteed to like because it performs.


I agree to an extent.

You must be able to align the putter properly, that's why I like my old Zebra putter.

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

However, the cost of the putter has nothing to do with controlling distance...that is a matter of feel and muscle memory.

 

I also have an old T.P. Mills TPM 7 which is very comparable to the much more expensive Scotty Cameron Newport line.

Two entirely different putters but after a few strokes I can putt equally the same with either.

 

Another good indicator that cost is secondary is the number of expensive putters golfers are selling because they turned out not to be the answer..

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Timer View Post

You must be able to align the putter properly, that's why I like my old Zebra putter.

 

More lines don't necessarily mean you can align it properly. I'd be willing to bet, having fit people now for quite awhile, that you don't actually align inside the hole from ten feet.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Timer View Post

However, the cost of the putter has nothing to do with controlling distance...that is a matter of feel and muscle memory.

 

No it's not. It's a matter of having a putter that is fit for you - the right amount of weight in the proper locations.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Timer View Post

Another good indicator that cost is secondary is the number of expensive putters golfers are selling because they turned out not to be the answer..

 

Yes, they're not the answer… because they weren't fit for them.

post #16 of 23

As for upgrading the equipment.  I would play with what you have and upgrade pieces as you find them no longer meeting your needs. 

 

I would skip the "intermediate set."  To me Adam's tight lies sets are a good deal, but they only represent a good deal if you have nothing to start from, and that isn't the case for you.  I think you had the right idea with your driver.  As one piece breaks, stops working, buy a second hand named brand piece to replace it. 

 

Depending on how quickly you take to the game, you will develop  a repeatable swing.  Once you get to that point, you will appreciate how upgraded equipment can improve your game.  At that time, you will know when to upgrade. 

 

In other words, what you have is fine to start with, and you will know when you are ready to upgrade.

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
I really appreciate all of the input and hope at some point to have something to give back to this forum that has been so helpful and encouraging to me! In the meantime is there anyone out there that needs to know how to hit a wicked slice? I can show you how!!
post #18 of 23

If you've already broken your driver the Adams seem like a good way to go.

 

Gradually, you will replace your driver, woods, hybrids, irons and putter... often in that order.  Adams GT irons are a nice basic design that will not be significantly upgraded by any other in the market.

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