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Don't pull the pin!!! - Page 2

post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

Read Post #16.

I will be the first one to ask someone if they were born in a barn! 

Common sense should always prevail, Mr. Desmond. Someone should always ask. The rules justify them asking and common sense does as well.

 

The opponent should not pull it.  But knowing that people sometimes do, the player should announce his intentions to prevent the harm.

post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

Read Post #16.

I will be the first one to ask someone if they were born in a barn! 

Common sense should always prevail, Mr. Desmond. Someone should always ask. The rules justify them asking and common sense does as well.

Well, I could not respond to your post unless I first read it.

 

I say this with assurance based on 58 years on this earth:

 

If you rely on the common sense of others, disappointment will greet you with open arms. Control what you feel you need to and can control, and have a fun ride with the rest...

 

You can control, "Leave the pin in, please."

post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Well, I could not respond to your post unless I first read it.

 

I say this with assurance based on 58 years on this earth:

 

If you rely on the common sense of others, disappointment will greet you with open arms. Control what you feel you need to and can control, and have a fun ride with the rest...

 

You can control, "Leave the pin in, please."

lol I am well aware of the lack of common sense in others on this planet. One thing that I am also aware of, is that regardless of age, absent mindedness runs rampant through people of all ages.

I am not going to keep babysitting people though and say something like "Leave the pin in please" when someone is standing off of the green. By that point, if I did not ask for help, they shouldn't feel the need to jog it out to the pin and pull it for me. That's when the look on my face will say it all and they will simply know better next time.... no stress, no mess. 

That's how I learned... sometimes you don't even have to say anything. Just a look is enough.

PS: Obviously, if someone is attending it or close to it, I'll ask. In the case of the OP, the guy was not close enough to the pin to make him uncomfortable and warrant him being asked to leave it in.

I'm not making a big deal out of this either. I'm just saying, those that don't know any better, use your head and leave the damn thing alone unless you're asked! c2_beer.gif

post #22 of 37

I play with a bunch of my client's friends, who are 55+, and I always hear, "Leave it in" or "You want to leave it in?"

 

Heck, you probably hear the same in your group, too.

 

Yeah, they ought to leave it alone ... but some can't help themselves thinking they are being helpful ... not!

post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

I play with a bunch of my client's friends, who are 55+, and I always hear, "Leave it in" or "You want to leave it in?"

 

Heck, you probably hear the same in your group, too.

 

Yeah, they ought to leave it alone ... but some can't help themselves thinking they are being helpful ... not!

Now, I agree! c2_beer.gif

post #24 of 37

Heck I get people asking that when I am on the green. I'm not sure some people don't think the flag is a handy tool to fling the ball out of the cup when they're fortunate enough to hole one beyond gimme range. I followed a group on Sun. and I'm almost certain they didn't pull a flag the entire day. But now that I think of it flag tending is a blast from the past, was a time it was more prevalent, on and off the green.

post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Well, I could not respond to your post unless I first read it.

 

I say this with assurance based on 58 years on this earth:

 

If you rely on the common sense of others, disappointment will greet you with open arms. Control what you feel you need to and can control, and have a fun ride with the rest...

 

You can control, "Leave the pin in, please."

 

Or, as I like to say, common sense is an oxymoron, because sense is not, and never has been, common.  I always ask others, and I always make my own wishes clear when I am playing the shot.  Clarity and getting the right result is what counts. 

post #26 of 37

Signal all intentions -- works for driving and around the green. Tell your mates what you want. Ask your mates what they want.

 

While in Scotland a few years ago, we were surprised that the caddies, seeing one of us was about to putt, would ask, "Away?" Knowing it was our turn to play, we would say "Yes." After four rounds, we finally figured out that "away?" was them asking if we wanted the pin away. When we explained that we called that "Pulling the pin" they mockingly asked if we wanted them to "pole the pin" -- mocking both the expression and our Chicago accents.

 

Lesson for me -- make sure my playing mates know if I want the pin in or out.

post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slicer219 View Post

Yesterday, I was chipping onto the green for birdie from about 20 feet out.  It was a nice little downhill run and I read it beautifully, I watched the ball land on the green and break just at the right time and head for the hole.  What I didn't notice was the gentleman I was playing with take a couple steps over and remove the pin until it was too late to stop him.  The ball was a touch too fast, popped over the hole and proceeded to travel on down the hill.  I'm not saying I would have holed it, although I think it was very possible, but at worst it would have been stopped by the flag and I could have put it in for par as opposed to the bogey I carded.  My first reaction was to wrap my pitching wedge around his neck... just wondering if anyone else had something like this happen to them and how they would have reacted.  

Happened to me this past weekend. Everyone knows that I never have the pin pulled when I am off of the green (in my regular group)

I am guessing that because my putter was in my hands that he thought I was on, but of course he was wrong. I yelled to leave it in as he was pulling it, but of course he didnt listen and the ball skipped over the hole and he had to hear it for a bit from me the rest of the round.

The golf gods got him for doing it - he lost 4 balls over the next 3 holes.
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by rustyredcab View Post

Signal all intentions -- works for driving and around the green. Tell your mates what you want. Ask your mates what they want.

 

While in Scotland a few years ago, we were surprised that the caddies, seeing one of us was about to putt, would ask, "Away?" Knowing it was our turn to play, we would say "Yes." After four rounds, we finally figured out that "away?" was them asking if we wanted the pin away. When we explained that we called that "Pulling the pin" they mockingly asked if we wanted them to "pole the pin" -- mocking both the expression and our Chicago accents.

 

Lesson for me -- make sure my playing mates know if I want the pin in or out.

 

The rules call it "removing the flagstick".  No ambiguity in that.  a2_wink.gif

post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slicer219 View Post

Yesterday, I was chipping onto the green for birdie from about 20 feet out.  It was a nice little downhill run and I read it beautifully, I watched the ball land on the green and break just at the right time and head for the hole.  What I didn't notice was the gentleman I was playing with take a couple steps over and remove the pin until it was too late to stop him.  The ball was a touch too fast, popped over the hole and proceeded to travel on down the hill.  I'm not saying I would have holed it, although I think it was very possible, but at worst it would have been stopped by the flag and I could have put it in for par as opposed to the bogey I carded.  My first reaction was to wrap my pitching wedge around his neck... just wondering if anyone else had something like this happen to them and how they would have reacted.  

Happened to me this past weekend. Everyone knows that I never have the pin pulled when I am off of the green (in my regular group)

I am guessing that because my putter was in my hands that he thought I was on, but of course he was wrong. I yelled to leave it in as he was pulling it, but of course he didnt listen and the ball skipped over the hole and he had to hear it for a bit from me the rest of the round.

The golf gods got him for doing it - he lost 4 balls over the next 3 holes.

 

Since he was apparently that close the hole, the rules deem that he was attending the flagstick, and had he not removed, your ball striking it would have resulted in a 2 stroke penalty on you.  Note 1 to Rule 17-1:

 

 

Quote:
Note 1: If the flagstick is in the hole and anyone stands near it while a stroke is being made, he is deemed to be attending the flagstick.
post #30 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post


The golf gods got him for doing it - he lost 4 balls over the next 3 holes.


Lol, I ended up pocketing his cash with a pair of Jacks in three putt poker... so I guess they were smiling on me as well.
post #31 of 37

Earlier this season I flipped out on a buddy of mine. Chipped from 15 yards out and it was going right at it...he pulls the pin without me asking and the ball goes RIGHT over the center of the cup and ends up 12 feet away. Instead of a likely birdie, or at worst a par, I end up with a bogey. 

 

Worst part was he tried to say it wasn't even over the hole...me and the other guy we were playing with were astounded at his denial...it clearly went right over and bounced off the back of the cup. 

 

I had to walk away for a second to prevent kicking him in the sack. 

post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post

Chipped from 15 yards out and it was going right at it...he pulls the pin without me asking and the ball goes RIGHT over the center of the cup and ends up 12 feet away. Instead of a likely birdie, or at worst a par, I end up with a bogey. 

 

Hate to say it, but if it had enough speed to go 12 feet by, then there's very little chance it would have gone in. It likely would have ricocheted off the pin and left you 4-5 feet away.

 

Bad break nonetheless.

post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post

 

Hate to say it, but if it had enough speed to go 12 feet by, then there's very little chance it would have gone in. It likely would have ricocheted off the pin and left you 4-5 feet away.

 

Bad break nonetheless.

 

Actually, most of my chip ins have been screamers that would have gone way past the pin. If they're center of the cup, they drop a lot of the time...or maybe I'm just lucky?

 

I very infrequently die a chip into the hole, they almost always have way too much zip on them when I hole out.

 

EDIT: It was also from the back of the green sloping downhill, so the 12 feet isn't as much zip as you'd probably think.

post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post

 

Actually, most of my chip ins have been screamers that would have gone way past the pin. If they're center of the cup, they drop a lot of the time...or maybe I'm just lucky?

 

I very infrequently die a chip into the hole, they almost always have way too much zip on them when I hole out.

 

EDIT: It was also from the back of the green sloping downhill, so the 12 feet isn't as much zip as you'd probably think.

 

Makes sense. I must not be as lucky. If any of my chip shots hit the pin, they tend to ricochet. Ergo, I pull the pin any time I think I have a reasonable chance of making a chip.

post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post

 

Makes sense. I must not be as lucky. If any of my chip shots hit the pin, they tend to ricochet. Ergo, I pull the pin any time I think I have a reasonable chance of making a chip.

 

If I was a slightly better chipper, I'd probably have them pull it every time. But I'm accurate enough line wise that I'd prefer to keep it in as a sort of backboard to possibly prevent me from screaming by if I'm lucky enough to hit it.

post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post

 

Makes sense. I must not be as lucky. If any of my chip shots hit the pin, they tend to ricochet. Ergo, I pull the pin any time I think I have a reasonable chance of making a chip.

I prefer it out if I can see the hole, but I'm not going to go to much trouble to pull it or have somebody else pull it unless they are already on the green or I'm really close. So even though I think my odds are slightly better of making it with it out it's such a close call that it doesn't warrant much time or effort.

 

Sometimes the flag stick has cost me a stroke and sometimes it's saved me a stroke.

 

If I'm on the green and someone on my team is about to attempt a "makeable chip" I ask if they want it in or out. If they say "in" I look at the stick and make sure it isn't leaning toward them. If it is I will have them wait until I can straighten it up (if the hole is cut correctly). Or they might want to reconsider if it is always going to lean toward them.

 

Hmmm. Makes me wonder if I would warn an opponent that the flag stick was leaning toward them. I can't remember that situation coming up (but it probably has). Pretty sure I would treat an opponent as I would a teammate and warn them...But with enough money on the line I'm not 100% sure....

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