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60º wedge - Page 2

Poll Results: Do you have a 60º wedge in your bag?

 
  • 78% (60)
    Yes
  • 21% (16)
    No
76 Total Votes  
post #19 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by godov View Post


Details: :)

 

-I have a 24,5 handicap and have been playing for a 1,5 years

 

- Titleist 910d driver

- Taylor Made RBZ stage 2 - 5 wood

- Taylor Made BBZ 4 rescue

- Taylor Made Burner 2 irons 4-PW

- 52 and 56º wedges

- Odissey White Hot putter

 

Started shooting in the 90's not too long ago.

 

Not much more to say I guess.

 

Thanks

I personally do not like a 60 and feel more comfortable and confident with a 58. My setup is a 52° GW, 54° SW and 58° LW. For me, this suits my needs because I have relatively long distances and the 54&58 combination gives me every option that I need... from hardpan, fairway, sand, rough, bare, etc. lies.

I may be upgrading to a 55&60 Vokey setup eventually next season, but for this season... the Callaway Jaws are staying in my bag. Try a 58 and if you like it, keep it. If not, bump up to a 60 and try it. I'd recommend buying a used club from a retailer first, or simply ordering a previous year's model for a reduced cost before you drop $100 on a wedge you're not sure of though.

post #20 of 59
Thread Starter 

If I was to buy a 60º wedge, what would be the recommended bounce?

 

I really don't get the concept of bounce, but what would you say it's easier to play?

post #21 of 59
Get as much as possible. From what I understand the higher the bounce the more the club skips along the ground. So if you have a 60/4 its going to dig a lot more than a 60/10. I don't know for sure if I'm right but I think thats what it does.
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by godov View Post

If I was to buy a 60º wedge, what would be the recommended bounce?

 

I really don't get the concept of bounce, but what would you say it's easier to play?

 

Bounce is the angle of the sole to the ground. Wedges with higher bounce angles perform better out of fluffy sand or high grass. A lower bounce wedge will perform better on courses with tight lies, thin bunker beds, or even off of a hardpan bare lie.

 

Clubs with lower bounce are ideal for tight lies, such as your hardpan/bare lies, or lies in tightly cut fairways. Clubs with higher bounce are ideal for shaggy fairways, thick, deep rough, or light and fluffy sand.

 

Low bounce translates into less opportunity for hitting a shot thin, as the sole of the club should sweep over the surface, rather than cut into it. Some manufacturers like Scratch will typically categorize a Lob Wedge in the "Digger, Sweeper and Slider" categories. Typically, lob wedges have 0 to 10 degrees of bounce, pitching wedges have 2 to 5 degrees of bounce and gap wedges have 5 to 12 degrees of bounc


High bounce translates into the club being able to "skim" the ground for a longer duration of time while reducing the ability of the club to "dig" into the ground. This is usually ideal for light sand, deep rough or really hairy fairways (fairways that may have not been cut recently, or have sporadic growth due to extreme weather (lots of rain with high temperatures).
 

post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by godov View Post

If I was to buy a 60º wedge, what would be the recommended bounce?

 

I really don't get the concept of bounce, but what would you say it's easier to play?

Okay, I've seen the responses, and some of them are traditional.

 

Tight conditions = low bounce

 

Lush conditions = high bounce

 

It's NOT that simple.

 

A guy who digs, traps (makes a nice divot) will not like a low bounce wedge, no matter what the conditions. In fact, most newbies won't like a low bounce wedge - why? Because it's relatively unforgiving. It won't glide (bounce helps with gliding) along the ground if you hit it a bit fat, if you come in aggressively with low bounce, you will stick that club in the ground before the ball and get nothing from the shot, whereas a higher bounce wedge will glide along the ground.

 

What I look for is a medium sole width, as opposed to thin or wide and high bounce AND relief (grinding away of) at the heel, toe, and trailing edge. I also look for relief upfront (towards the leading edge) so the leading edge sits low to the ground - so when the clubhead hits turf it acts like a low bounce wedge in getting under the ball, and then the high bounce takes over so the clubhead does not get stuck in the ground - the bounce helps to get it out of the divot you've created.

 

You see this in Edel Wedges - www.edelgolf.com  Go to wedges and look at the various grind pics.

 

Your ideal bounce depends on your swing and how your wedge and your swing interact with the turf -- I spent about 10 years looking for a wedge that fit me -- finally I went to Edel for a custom fit.

 

At retail, you also see a low leading edge, moderate bounce in the new Callaway MacDaddy 2 Wedges - look at the Phil Grind  (U Grind) - according to Roger Cleveland, the designer, it has low bounce up front, and then the bounce takes over (see that funky grind at the bottom). That sole is a bit chunky for me -- too wide, and it doesn't have sufficient bounce (10). I would be more likely to look at their C Grind with 14 of bounce, but would have to see how its leading edge sits on the ground.

 

Hope this helps - good luck.

post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by godov View Post

If I was to buy a 60º wedge, what would be the recommended bounce?

 

I really don't get the concept of bounce, but what would you say it's easier to play?

 

Make sure it's a Vokey wedge when you get it.
post #25 of 59

Yes you need a 60 degree high bounce wedge, someday.  It is a difficult club to hit.  I would let your skills develop more.  Or if you have figured out how to engage the bounce of a wedge go for it.

There is a good thread in instruction about wedges and bounce.

post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by NBCgolfer View Post

 

Make sure it's a Vokey wedge when you get it.

Oh, gosh, not again...

 

 

Okay, I played a Vokey SM4 60-10, and it couldn't do everything I wanted. The leading edge sits a bit too high in tight conditions for most shots around the green to put sufficient dynamic loft on the shot. Now if you set your hands ahead in tight lies where the leading edge is tight to the ground, it's fine ... but it is limiting your creativity.

post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Oh, gosh, not again...

 

 

Okay, I played a Vokey SM4 60-10, and it couldn't do everything I wanted. The leading edge sits a bit too high in tight conditions for most shots around the green to put sufficient dynamic loft on the shot. Now if you set your hands ahead in tight lies where the leading edge is tight to the ground, it's fine ... but it is limiting your creativity.

 

Though I agree.... kind of. The amount of feel I get from my Vokey wedges is unmatched. I have tried several other, but still love my Vokey. However, like a putter (but maybe not to that extent), it's a personal thing.
post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Okay, I've seen the responses, and some of them are traditional.

 

Tight conditions = low bounce

 

Lush conditions = high bounce

 

It's NOT that simple.

 

A guy who digs, traps (makes a nice divot) will not like a low bounce wedge, no matter what the conditions. In fact, most newbies won't like a low bounce wedge - why? Because it's relatively unforgiving. It won't glide (bounce helps with gliding) along the ground if you hit it a bit fat, if you come in aggressively with low bounce, you will stick that club in the ground before the ball and get nothing from the shot, whereas a higher bounce wedge will glide along the ground.

 

What I look for is a medium sole width, as opposed to thin or wide and high bounce AND relief (grinding away of) at the heel, toe, and trailing edge. I also look for relief upfront (towards the leading edge) so the leading edge sits low to the ground - so when the clubhead hits turf it acts like a low bounce wedge in getting under the ball, and then the high bounce takes over so the clubhead does not get stuck in the ground - the bounce helps to get it out of the divot you've created.

 

You see this in Edel Wedges - www.edelgolf.com  Go to wedges and look at the various grind pics.

 

Your ideal bounce depends on your swing and how your wedge and your swing interact with the turf -- I spent about 10 years looking for a wedge that fit me -- finally I went to Edel for a custom fit.

 

At retail, you also see a low leading edge, moderate bounce in the new Callaway MacDaddy 2 Wedges - look at the Phil Grind  (U Grind) - according to Roger Cleveland, the designer, it has low bounce up front, and then the bounce takes over (see that funky grind at the bottom). That sole is a bit chunky for me -- too wide, and it doesn't have sufficient bounce (10). I would be more likely to look at their C Grind with 14 of bounce, but would have to see how its leading edge sits on the ground.

 

Hope this helps - good luck.

The OP should listen to this. 

I provided the basic "introduction" to bounce in my response. You do need to make sure you select the wedge accordingly though, as in make sure it fits your swing style. For me, I prefer low bounce because I typically take a very little divot and often pick the ball clean. I am not comfortable with higher bounce and I do tend to skull more shots for my swing type.

post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by NBCgolfer View Post

 

Though I agree.... kind of. The amount of feel I get from my Vokey wedges is unmatched. I have tried several other, but still love my Vokey. However, like a putter (but maybe not to that extent), it's a personal thing.

Agree - I like the Vokey head and feel of the club off the ball - the new design is more forgiving off the club face. The balance of the club seems to work, too, and the heat treated grooves last longer than previous editions.

 

If Vokey was grinding the head, he could probably get what I want, and NOW Vokey has grind customization to a limited extent. But when you go that far, you should get an Edel fitting and wedge - I believe the Edel is less expensive than a "custom" grind Vokey when you consider the stampings and paint job. What I don't like about telephone fittings with any maker of wedges, is that most guys don't know what the heck they need although they think they do. That's why you get the Edel. You put all of your questions to rest with a custom fit grind, shaft, etc.

post #30 of 59

while I have a cleveland 588   52-8, vokey 56-8 , 56-11 and 60-4 wedge...  I also have two Macgregor MT tourney wedges in 56 and 60, not sure of the bounce, but think they are a higher bounce.. 

 

 

this is my thoughts on the 60* wedge.....  its basically a club I would only use if I was within 50 yards of the green, and the green is elevated... 

 

or the green is surrounded by mounds or hills and you need to hit a flop shot over them..   Or you are on the short side of the green and need to stick a flop shot..     its kind of a tricky club to try to explain to someone if they need one or not..... 

post #31 of 59
I carry a 45 pw, 52 and 56 wedges
post #32 of 59

I'm really looking to expand my wedge setup as well. I really don't see a need for a 60* wedge for myself, but as of now I have a low bounce 52* wedge that I use almost exclusively around the green. I can close it up for a bump-and-run shot (though not ideal for long runs), or I can open it up and play is as a 60* on the rare occasions that it's needed that way. I've become quite proficient at using this one wedge for most of my shots around the green, but with some of the great wedges that are being made these days, I would like to upgrade soon.

 

I will likely stick to 48, 52, and 56 though. Beyond that my need for one is very rare, in which instances I can make a 56 work.

post #33 of 59

I have a 61* in my bag and use it for nearly everything near the green with the exception of fluffier sand and thicker rough. I typically play a more firm course and have more of a sweeper style swing so I prefer lower bounce. My 53* has 8* and my 61* has 5* of bounce, I also have a higher bounce 57* that I will use for softer lies.

post #34 of 59
I have a 60, with lots of bounce. Its a great club when i use it in the right situations - when i need something high and hopefully with a soft landing - and when I don't decelerate. I prefer to chip low whenever possible, so I really only use the 60 a couple times per round.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmdmbike View Post

I have a 60, with lots of bounce. Its a great club when i use it in the right situations - when i need something high and hopefully with a soft landing - and when I don't decelerate. I prefer to chip low whenever possible, so I really only use the 60 a couple times per round.

What wedge is it? How much bounce?

Other than Edel, I don't know of many 60*s even available with much bounce. I wish they'd start making more....
post #36 of 59
It's the Cleveland 588 RTX cavity back style, and mine has 12 degrees of bounce on the 60. Also have a 56, same model, with 14 degrees. Most 60's seem pretty low bounce, 4 - 7 seems common, so this is one of the higher bounce ones I've come across. I think Vokey also makes a 60 with 10 degrees of bounce.
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