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Sand wedges and shaft flexes

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Okay, something I have been struggling with is hitting shots out of the bunker.  (I think) a lot of people have problems with it, but mine is especially horrid, trust me.  During my last lesson, my golf teacher let me use his sand wedge, and of course, I hit the ball right onto the green, first try.  Then he threw another ball into the bunker, and what did I do?  Same thing.  Night and day, honestly.  We quickly came to the conclusion that I needed to get a new sand wedge, pronto.

 

My boyfriend gave me a 58 degree wedge a while ago, just because he never used it and thought I could use it to replace my horrendous sand wedge.  However, my golf teacher told me that I shouldn't use it, because it was too long, and that I should definitely not use it until I got it cut down.  Here's question one: how much would it hurt me to use a club (sand wedge in particular) that is too long for me, if I just choke up on it?  Or do I need to go buy a lady's sand wedge?  (question 2 ties into this as well)  Money's tight for this college kid, so if I can avoid buying a new sand wedge, I would.

 

Topic number two: Female vs male flexes.  I went into a golf store the other day and tested out some drivers, just for fun.  I was doing alright with the women's drivers, and then the guy working there decided I should try out a men's driver because of my club head speed (no, I don't know what that number was, unfortunately.)  So much better.  When I do decide to buy a driver, I will definitely be getting a men's regular flex.  Question two is, when I look into buying other types of clubs, should I look in the men's and just get them cut down?  Or is it just the driver that I would need a men's in?  Men's vs women's clubs in general?  Opinions are greatly appreciated!

post #2 of 10

Sounds you need to be fit for your clubs.  One thing to remember is that if you take a shaft and cut it down, you make it stiffer; so if you like a men's regular, perhaps you should just take a ladies' flex and get it cut down, which would put it pretty close to a men's regular.

As for mens' vs womens' sets, its really all personal preference.  IMO, most womens' sets are little more than beginners' sets and arent something you want to use once you get serious about golf but to each their own.

post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer View Post

Sounds you need to be fit for your clubs.

 

As for mens' vs womens' sets, its really all personal preference.  IMO, most womens' sets are little more than beginners' sets and arent something you want to use once you get serious about golf but to each their own.

 

Get fit for clubs? Definitely.

 

But, I disagree with Gaijin's words which I put into blue. About 2005, Callaway and Adams led the way as the world's golf club manufacturers "went back to the drawing board" to design golf clubs especially for women players.

 

As for R-flex club shafts, some women can benefit from them. Women who are taller, and/or have a background as softball or tennis players, may generate enough clubhead speed they can use the slightly firmer shafts R-flex shafts for control.

 

But, you don't know for sure until you get fitted. Since you are a beginner, a simple static fitting would be best. This type of fitting takes into account clubhead speed to estimate shaft flex, and checks shaft length and lie angle, and grip thickness.

 

Beginners don't benefit from more complicated fittings. As a beginner, your swing changes a lot from day to day until it falls into a groove during your first season or two. The static fittings gets you started - ideally - with clubs that won't hurt your game.


Edited by WUTiger - 7/21/13 at 12:05am
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

 

 

But, I disagree with Gaijin's words which I put into blue. About 2005, Callaway and Adams led the way as the world's golf club manufacturers "went back to the drawing board" to design golf clubs especially for women players.

 

I stand by my original statement.  Ive never seen many womens' sets that I was all that impressed with, other than maybe the Adam's Finesse.

IMO, most of the womens' sets out there are nothing more than mens' starter sets which they paint pink or some other kind of pastel color, put L-flex shafts on them and call it a day.

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer View Post

One thing to remember is that if you take a shaft and cut it down, you make it stiffer; so if you like a men's regular, perhaps you should just take a ladies' flex and get it cut down, which would put it pretty close to a men's regular.

My understanding is that cutting from the tip changes stiffness, whereas from the grip end of the shaft only affects the length. Am I wrong on this?
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shindig View Post


My understanding is that cutting from the tip changes stiffness, whereas from the grip end of the shaft only affects the length. Am I wrong on this?


Ive never heard that.  My clubbuilder has always cut my shafts at the grip end though.  That might be a question better answered by someone who knows more about clubbuilding than I do.

post #7 of 10
Depends on the shaft and its design
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer View Post

... IMO, most of the womens' sets out there are nothing more than mens' starter sets which they paint pink or some other kind of pastel color, put L-flex shafts on them and call it a day.

 

Read this WSJ article about Callaway's research and product development on women's clubs. Other companies have since joined in.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121372702050581575.html

post #9 of 10
More than likely, your issue with the 58* wedge isn't the length, nor the shaft. It's the bounce.m most 58* wedges have very little bounce and will tend to dig into the sand for you. You'd be much better served with a high bounce sand wedge. 56* or so and at least 14* of bounce. Get clubs that fit you for length and flex, but when it comes to your sand wedge, make sure you have a lot of bounce....
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

 

As for R-flex club shafts, some women can benefit from them. Women who are taller, and/or have a background as softball or tennis players, may generate enough clubhead speed they can use the slightly firmer shafts R-flex shafts for control.

 

...

 

As a beginner, your swing changes a lot from day to day until it falls into a groove during your first season or two.

 

I went into a golf shop to hit some drivers and to just see where my swing was at, and he said based on my club head speed I would benefit from a men's regular flex.  I'm wondering if this would apply to all of my clubs or just a driver or what.  Still waiting to get into my "groove", and will not be looking into a new set of clubs for some time, but I'm definitely curious as to what I should be looking for.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

More than likely, your issue with the 58* wedge isn't the length, nor the shaft. It's the bounce.m most 58* wedges have very little bounce and will tend to dig into the sand for you. You'd be much better served with a high bounce sand wedge. 56* or so and at least 14* of bounce. Get clubs that fit you for length and flex, but when it comes to your sand wedge, make sure you have a lot of bounce....

 

I just got my boyfriend's 56 that he doesn't use cut down to my size on Friday... hit a shot into the bunker with it the same day, and wow, it was like butter.  No problem at all.  Might have just got lucky, but still.  Night and day, for sure.  Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

 

Read this WSJ article about Callaway's research and product development on women's clubs. Other companies have since joined in.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121372702050581575.html

 

Interesting article... I'm definitely not ready to go and buy a new set of clubs, and probably won't be for at least a few years.  But that's really cool stuff.

 

Thank you for the input, everyone.  I would love to get some more info on what cutting the shaft down does to the flex.

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