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How did the Ohio golf meet-up/outing go? - Page 6  

post #91 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post

 

Nope. But you know it happens. 

 

"No, that wasn't me...I didn't hit that."

I've been VERY fortunate in that I have never damaged anyone's property. It's pretty amazing because, like a lot of golfers, I have battled a pretty wicked slice for a good portion of my golfing life. I always keep some business cards on me so that if I do damage something and no one is home I can leave a card with contact info. 

post #92 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappy091 View Post

I've been VERY fortunate in that I have never damaged anyone's property. It's pretty amazing because, like a lot of golfers, I have battled a pretty wicked slice for a good portion of my golfing life. I always keep some business cards on me so that if I do damage something and no one is home I can leave a card with contact info. 

 

I hit a house once way back when. The ball just bounced right off of it. The owner was actually outside already, just shrugged and said it happens at least once a week. lol

post #93 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post

 

I hit a house once way back when. The ball just bounced right off of it. The owner was actually outside already, just shrugged and said it happens at least once a week. lol

Oh, I've hit plenty of houses. It's just been all roofs and walls. No damage done. 

 

I hate that sickening feeling in your stomach as you watch the drive curve right and your just waiting to hear glass shatter or if your lucky the thud of the ball striking the roof. 

post #94 of 101
Thread Starter 

To add an anecdote to the conversation that I've already posted elsewhere.

 

A buddy of mine was trying to draw a ball over some trees and houses on a dogleg right.  He ended up hooking it and it landed in a lady's pool.  She was cleaning the pool at the time.  When we went to look for it (unaware it had landed in the pool) she identified his ball as a TM Penta.  He said, "great.  Can I get that ball back?  It's like $5."  He didn't get the ball back, and I was really embarrassed for him and made sure to apologize on his behalf.  

post #95 of 101

Here is something interesting that might add to the discussion- 

 

The New York Courts of Appeals, the highest court in New York State and the equivalent of other states’ Supreme Court, has ruled that a golfer need not yell “Fore” on a mis-hit shot. According to the Court of Appeals, those participating in sporting and recreational events assume the risks associated with the activity. In the case of golf, that includes getting hit with an errant shot.

 
The case before the Court involved three golfers playing on a Long Island course. Two members of the threesome hit their balls into the deep rough. Both located their balls. As the one in front turned to announce that he had found his ball, the player behind swung at his ball and shanked it, hitting the other in the head. For non-golfers, a shank is a shot hit, usually hit off the hosel [the part of the shaft that attaches to the club face], that flies off at an angle not intended by the golfer.
 
In this instance, the player who was hit was a neuroradiologist who lost sight in one eye and was unable to continue working due to the injury. New York’s Court of Appeals upheld rulings by the lower courts dismissing the case. The Court explained that intentional or reckless conduct may result in a legitimate claim, but that was not the case here. Being struck by an unintentionally shanked shot, according to the Court of Appeals, “reflects a commonly appreciated risk of golf.”
post #96 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleRobot View Post

Here is something interesting that might add to the discussion- 

 

The New York Courts of Appeals, the highest court in New York State and the equivalent of other states’ Supreme Court, has ruled that a golfer need not yell “Fore” on a mis-hit shot. According to the Court of Appeals, those participating in sporting and recreational events assume the risks associated with the activity. In the case of golf, that includes getting hit with an errant shot.

 
The case before the Court involved three golfers playing on a Long Island course. Two members of the threesome hit their balls into the deep rough. Both located their balls. As the one in front turned to announce that he had found his ball, the player behind swung at his ball and shanked it, hitting the other in the head. For non-golfers, a shank is a shot hit, usually hit off the hosel [the part of the shaft that attaches to the club face], that flies off at an angle not intended by the golfer.
 
In this instance, the player who was hit was a neuroradiologist who lost sight in one eye and was unable to continue working due to the injury. New York’s Court of Appeals upheld rulings by the lower courts dismissing the case. The Court explained that intentional or reckless conduct may result in a legitimate claim, but that was not the case here. Being struck by an unintentionally shanked shot, according to the Court of Appeals, “reflects a commonly appreciated risk of golf.”

 

If you're sitting on your back porch and I hit you, I don't think you were "participating" in my recreational activity......at least not intentionally!  a2_wink.gif

post #97 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleRobot View Post

Here is something interesting that might add to the discussion- 

 

The New York Courts of Appeals, the highest court in New York State and the equivalent of other states’ Supreme Court, has ruled that a golfer need not yell “Fore” on a mis-hit shot. According to the Court of Appeals, those participating in sporting and recreational events assume the risks associated with the activity. In the case of golf, that includes getting hit with an errant shot.

 
The case before the Court involved three golfers playing on a Long Island course. Two members of the threesome hit their balls into the deep rough. Both located their balls. As the one in front turned to announce that he had found his ball, the player behind swung at his ball and shanked it, hitting the other in the head. For non-golfers, a shank is a shot hit, usually hit off the hosel [the part of the shaft that attaches to the club face], that flies off at an angle not intended by the golfer.
 
In this instance, the player who was hit was a neuroradiologist who lost sight in one eye and was unable to continue working due to the injury. New York’s Court of Appeals upheld rulings by the lower courts dismissing the case. The Court explained that intentional or reckless conduct may result in a legitimate claim, but that was not the case here. Being struck by an unintentionally shanked shot, according to the Court of Appeals, “reflects a commonly appreciated risk of golf.”

 

If you're sitting on your back porch and I hit you, I don't think you were "participating" in my recreational activity......at least not intentionally!  a2_wink.gif

 

Yeah, I'd be interested to see if that decision would be similarly applied to a case in which the plaintiff wasn't "participating". Surely there is still some assumption of risk?

post #98 of 101

I am an insurance agent and have dealt with golfers hitting homes a few times...  A golfer is liable for damage caused if they hit a home with one of their shots.  If that happens, the golfer has one of two options:  1) pay for the damages personally; or 2) submit a liability claim through their own Homeowner or Renter's policy.  Many folks don't know this, but liability coverage from homeowner policies generally protects us even if we are away from home (you are golfing and hit a house, you are at the park and your dog bites a child, etc.).  Also, there is no deductible associated with a liability claim.

 

If the homeowner does not know who caused the damage, he can look into submitting a Section 1 claim on his own policy.  Most of the time, however, that really isn't an option because the cost to repair the damage is less than the deductible on the homeowner policy,  Where I live, the minimum deductible is $1,000.  Some folks, like David, have higher deductibles than that.

 

While I know how these situations are handled, I fully understand the concept of inherent risk.  If I buy a home on a golf course, I should expect to get hit once in a while.  Consider, however, what could happen if the golfer wasn't held liable.  Idiots could "have some fun" and intentionally aim at a house.  Since the golfers would never admit to doing it intentionally and you wouldn't be able to prove their intent, they'd get away with it...

post #99 of 101
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boil3rmak3r View Post

I am an insurance agent and have dealt with golfers hitting homes a few times...  A golfer is liable for damage caused if they hit a home with one of their shots.  If that happens, the golfer has one of two options:  1) pay for the damages personally; or 2) submit a liability claim through their own Homeowner or Renter's policy.  Many folks don't know this, but liability coverage from homeowner policies generally protects us even if we are away from home (you are golfing and hit a house, you are at the park and your dog bites a child, etc.).  Also, there is no deductible associated with a liability claim.

 

If the homeowner does not know who caused the damage, he can look into submitting a Section 1 claim on his own policy.  Most of the time, however, that really isn't an option because the cost to repair the damage is less than the deductible on the homeowner policy,  Where I live, the minimum deductible is $1,000.  Some folks, like David, have higher deductibles than that.

 

While I know how these situations are handled, I fully understand the concept of inherent risk.  If I buy a home on a golf course, I should expect to get hit once in a while.  Consider, however, what could happen if the golfer wasn't held liable.  Idiots could "have some fun" and intentionally aim at a house.  Since the golfers would never admit to doing it intentionally and you wouldn't be able to prove their intent, they'd get away with it...

This is what the lawyer explained to me.  Is it more economical to just pay out of pocket - say $200 to fix a broken window - than it is to go through insurance?

post #100 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJBam View Post

This is what the lawyer explained to me.  Is it more economical to just pay out of pocket - say $200 to fix a broken window - than it is to go through insurance?

It probably depends on ones financial situation.  A liability claim can make your homeowner premiums increase.  If you have multiple claims, the company may cancel you and then you will have to find insurance with a company that specializes in higher risk exposures and your premiums will definitely be higher. 

 

IMO, if you have never submitted a homeowner claim and the damages are high (let's say you smash out a $2,000 decorative window), go through your policy.  If the damage is only a couple of hundred bucks, pay it yourself if you have to means.  If you have a history of homeowner claims, you would probably want to consider paying it yourself to prevent a potential cancellation.

 

Bottom line, if you're ever in that position, chat with your insurance agent.  He/she will be able advise you as to what might be best for you.

post #101 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

I'd hoped my earlier post would put this to bed. It's not the topic of this thread and discussion of it is over. The Committee has decided. a2_wink.gif
 

So, when I said this earlier, turns out I meant it.

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