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Recommend a Golf Net?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hello all, 

 

Does anyone here own a golf net and mat? If so, what do you think of it and would you recommend it. I live in an area where it seems like it snows 6 months out of the year and I'd like to get something put in to my garage. 

 

I'm also brand new to the site and semi-brand new to golf as well. The golf bug bit me hard. 

 

Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crim View Post

Hello all, 

 

Does anyone here own a golf net and mat? If so, what do you think of it and would you recommend it. I live in an area where it seems like it snows 6 months out of the year and I'd like to get something put in to my garage. 

 

I'm also brand new to the site and semi-brand new to golf as well. The golf bug bit me hard. 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

I have a Callaway net

 

http://www.amazon.com/Callaway-Tri-Ball-Hitting-Net-7-Feet/dp/B005ZZ8BOC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376106389&sr=8-1&keywords=golf+net+callaway

 

and an Emerald golf mat

 

http://www.amazon.com/PGM3660-Emerald-Par-Golf-Mat/dp/B0058DECVC/ref=sr_1_4?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1376106456&sr=1-4&keywords=golf+mat

 

I like them both.  I use them with real balls. 

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Here's some newbie questions. Sometimes at the driving range or course I feel like I'm making pretty good contact, yet when I look up I'm actually pushing the ball right. If you're hitting into a net how do you know if you're doing something incorrectly? Or are nets mainly just to get used to make solid contact and perfecting your swing? Do you aim for specific spots into the net with different clubs?

post #4 of 16

+1 on the Callaway Triball.  I have the 9' version.  It's real easy to setup and take down....or move around.  It comes in a nice nylon carry case.  I got mine from Walmart.com for $114 which I think is a pretty good deal with free site to store delivery.

 

I use a Fairway Pro golf mat (http://www.fairwayprogolfmat.com/).  It has a pretty realistic feel that was surprising the first time I hit from it after having hit from regular mats. What's not evident is that the mat is pretty thick (in addition to being able to move) and can hold a regular tee.  And it's portable....which was a requirement for me.  

 

However, I might be hesitant to recommend it for a brand new golfer.  The "safe hitting area" is relatively small from side to side and the crazy inconsistent swings we all have as beginners could result in hitting the frame.  Front to back is no problem...plenty of room for fat shots.


Edited by Topper - 8/10/13 at 9:11am
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crim View Post

Here's some newbie questions. Sometimes at the driving range or course I feel like I'm making pretty good contact, yet when I look up I'm actually pushing the ball right. If you're hitting into a net how do you know if you're doing something incorrectly? Or are nets mainly just to get used to make solid contact and perfecting your swing? Do you aim for specific spots into the net with different clubs?

There's a good thread where Iacas (and others) bring up good points that sometimes our focus on ball flight can be counterproductive when trying to develop good swing mechanics.  It's a good read and nudged me into setting up a hitting net this summer.  That and the fact my family and work schedules do not allow enough time to go to the range to make any real swing improvements.  One thing I know for sure is that I cannot make swing improvements simply by playing golf.   I can't find the thread at the moment, but maybe someone else can.

 

You will be eventually able to feel when good ball contact is made.  A good mat will help a lot here.  A poor mat can mask poor shots.

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

Awesome info, thanks topper! I think what I'll do is get a couple lessons first so I can work on form and work out the inconsistencies of my swing.....THEN I'll get a net and mat. 

post #7 of 16

Check out the Rukknet.

post #8 of 16

I bought a Net Return net and a Real Feal golf mat about 4 years ago.  I have used them almost every day since then.  They both work extremely well and both still look brand new.  Extremely happy with both products.  The mat is nice and thick, thick enough to stick a tee in and I have no issues hitting down on the ball.  The net is pretty big . .which I like since I don't feel the need for side-nets and, so far, have never missed the net.  You can take the net down or set it up in just a few minutes . .although I mostly just leave it set up.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crim View Post

Hello all, 

 

Does anyone here own a golf net and mat? If so, what do you think of it and would you recommend it. I live in an area where it seems like it snows 6 months out of the year and I'd like to get something put in to my garage. 

 

I'm also brand new to the site and semi-brand new to golf as well. The golf bug bit me hard. 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 

 

I would recommend a golf net, but only if you intend to groove in your mistakes. In other words, don't do it. If you can't see the way the ball reacts to your swing, then it isn't worth hitting in my view as the risk outweighs the reward. You can swing a club without having to hit a ball, and this is what I would suggest you do. Take lessons from a pro, get yourself some good swing fundamentals, and then swing the club trying to groove the learned lessons from the pro.

post #10 of 16

http://thesandtrap.com/t/53895/hitting-into-a-net/180

 

lots of posts - building your own is really easy and really cheap

I took a PVC pipe and hung from it - a tarp, and a blanket (two layers since I found out the hard way that even a good tarp, single layer, you can hit right through it).

Eyebolts, nuts, clamps for the blanket, a couple carabiners, and a bunch of clothesline and it hoists up to the ceiling when not in use (just roll the tarp up and tie it to the pipe).  $25 max. and you're in business.  let the bottom stay loose (the 'loose' bit is how it's enabled to gently catch the ball - but you need to see if you have place for a full swing.

 

 

Monster Turf - I'll go find the link and update here.  Great mats
 

 (http://www.allturfmats.com/product-p/mt4860.htm)  that link takes me to a page that's cheaper than anything else on that particular product - don't know why.  Will update once I get it to see if it's any good.

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9iron View Post

 

 

 

I would recommend a golf net, but only if you intend to groove in your mistakes. In other words, don't do it. If you can't see the way the ball reacts to your swing, then it isn't worth hitting in my view as the risk outweighs the reward. You can swing a club without having to hit a ball, and this is what I would suggest you do. Take lessons from a pro, get yourself some good swing fundamentals, and then swing the club trying to groove the learned lessons from the pro.

So would you suggest waiting a year or so after multiple lessons and a better familiarity of my swing? Or would you suggest never getting one at all?

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crim View Post

So would you suggest waiting a year or so after multiple lessons and a better familiarity of my swing? Or would you suggest never getting one at all?

When I first started playing I hung an old mattress on the side of the barn where I had lights and went out there every night for hours hitting my driver into that mattress. Finally I bought a golf net but it didn't last very long since I left it outdoors all the time. Then bought another similar one that also didn't last long. Finally I bought a heavier net that is 10 foot square and hung it up in my batting cage, and it's still there.

 

Not a doubt in my mind that hitting all of those balls into the net made me a better player. Sure there were times when I thought I was hitting the ball great into the net and found out when I got to the course that I was actually hitting hooks (but at least they were nice solid hooks). Ha ha! Better than nothing.

 

Didn't take much adjustment on the course to get them straight enough to be playable.

 

Now I hit balls into the net for a while and every now and then hit an old ball down across the hay field to make sure they are flying relatively straight.

 

Without a range nearby I would be lost without a net. If nothing else it's good exercise.

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9iron View Post

I would recommend a golf net, but only if you intend to groove in your mistakes. In other words, don't do it. If you can't see the way the ball reacts to your swing, then it isn't worth hitting in my view as the risk outweighs the reward. You can swing a club without having to hit a ball, and this is what I would suggest you do. Take lessons from a pro, get yourself some good swing fundamentals, and then swing the club trying to groove the learned lessons from the pro.

 

This is a good point and why I hesitated for so long.  It makes no sense to groove in bad mechanics.  However, you can still have the same problem at a driving range even though you can see ball flight. 

 

Take periodic lessons and have an instructor point out a couple of swing flaws and show you drills to correct them.  Since you're in your back yard, it's easier to setup and use a video camera to check your progress.  Maybe consider Evolvr?

 

Swinging a club with no ball will help too like 9iron suggested. I used to box and trainers would have me spend a lot of time "shadow" boxing for the same effect.  But I will say, hitting a heavy bag, speed bag, and pad-work was still more fun.  Similarly, I find hitting a ball into a net is more fun.  I really like to hear the sound of a well struck ball even if I can't see it's full flight.
 
I'm relatively new to having a backyard hitting net but I shot my lowest round of the season yesterday and was only 4 over on the back 9.  Didn't even realize it until I added the round up after I got home.  I think having the net helps....but I also take periodic lessons where I'm given specific drills to work on.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9iron View Post

I would recommend a golf net, but only if you intend to groove in your mistakes. In other words, don't do it. If you can't see the way the ball reacts to your swing, then it isn't worth hitting in my view as the risk outweighs the reward. You can swing a club without having to hit a ball, and this is what I would suggest you do. Take lessons from a pro, get yourself some good swing fundamentals, and then swing the club trying to groove the learned lessons from the pro.

 

I disagree, and the thread linked in a post after yours explains a good bit of why.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

I disagree, and the thread linked in a post after yours explains a good bit of why.

 it certainly gets into the discussion, that's for sure.

 

(first 8 or 9 pages is this topic, the last couple have a lot of pictures and ideas for home nets)

 

for me, indoor net and good mat definitely helped me work on good contact.  A little climbing chalk on the mat and I can see club path.  A little knowledge of physics and you can infer the ball flight.  In addition, if you have lessons and are instructed to do a few drills, hitting into a net is great.

 

The whole discussion is about using it as a tool the best you can - taking an all or nothing approach to the topic is short sighted and a bit silly.  It's like saying driving range time or trackman time is pointless because you aren't actually playing down a fairway. Hell, recreational rounds are a waste of time because it's not a competition mentally.  Heck, why aren't there just 4 comps a year - the Majors - and the rest of the time everyone just sits in a chair visualizing golf - of course, visualizing is a waste of time.

 

think of the money courses could save not having to upkeep ranges and practice greens......for the children

 

I guess - for the price of a good $80 mat.  and a couple old blankets and a couple clamps from Home Depot - it's pretty cheap for someone to just try it out for themselves and not bother worrying about the positions 'for' or 'against'.

post #16 of 16

I opted to build my own net after buying one on line. It is described in another thread (Impact Net). You can also see it in my video in member swings.  I was apprehensive at first about what I heard about grooving in a bad swing e.t.c. but that is NOT the case.  My swing is quite solid now, and I can tell from where I hit the target what is going on.  I also use a synthetic lawn as a mat, I outfitted it with some rubber tees, tethered to it by a couple pieces of para cord. It is also described in another thread "Improvisation". One thing on mine is that I made sure that the bottom does not toucfh the ground, it is simply a sun shade that is weighted at the bottom and is free to swing back upon impact. Usually the ball hits and drops softly to the ground, but once in awhile if I hit at a large angle it will deflect. If you use an actual net that has slack, this should not happen as the net will "gather" the ball. I really like the fact that at any time day or night, I can duck out the patio door to my mini driving range. I practice pitches and chips from about 45 feet away and can even see ball flight. For drives, I stand about 18 feet away. (my net is 6.9 feet high and 10 ft wide).

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