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should I play a round between lessons?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I am getting ready to schedule my second lesson with a new coach third overall if u count what I did at the first as a lesson :( and was wondering if it was advisable to play a round in between. I took the first with him last saturday and didnt know if I should play a round next weekend or schedule my next lesson. On one side I feel it may be benificial to put what he gave me to use and on the other hand I dont want to go right back to what I was doing! What do you think/do?
post #2 of 11
I think the place to start putting what he gave you to use is the driving range. For me, it is very hard to think about my swing and swing changes on the course. Now, I am not saying you shouldn't play some too, but if you are serious about improving I believe you will be better off spending time on the range getting new skills dialed in. There are a number of threads here on how best to practice and they are worth the time to look up. Basically, don't just bang balls, but focus on specifics and always have a target.
post #3 of 11

If you feel like playing, you should play. If you feel like practicing, you should practice. Evaluate why you are taking lessons in the first place. Most would say to strike the ball better in order to achieve a lower score. Golf is a game.  You are supposed to enjoy it. Chances are you will never achieve perfection, few do.  You can learn something from a round to take with you to the next lesson. Keep the prize in sight....I want to "Play" better.   so......as "Old Tom" sez......"Gooo Plaay"!   Far too many people get so obsessed with practice, they lose sight of why as I alluded to in another thread. Some agree with me, most do not.   Quite frequently, while out on the course, I will hit a shot that seems so absolutely prestine, I wonder what happened. Savour those moments, and quite often you can recall just enough to take them to practice and discover what caused it.  Heck, take notes if you like.  Hogan did.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys! I always take notes!! He has had me working half speed so I think ill go one more lesson and a lot of practice before my next round! I had a blast at my lesson too if I could spend it with my buddies it would be even better but fun none the less!
post #5 of 11

What I have done the past few weeks (working on a big swing change, getting more upright was getting to flat going back) is I hit the range literally every day I'm off.  I was playing 5-6 rounds a week and now I am only playing 1. When I play I only try to make my swing I'm working on, I dint try to draw, fade, hit low or high or anything else.  I just try to play a normal shot and get it close to where I need it to go.  Plus you need to take it to the course some and see how it holds up under pressure.  It will be easy to get into old habits really fast.  You might enjoy a solo round so you can take your time and focus and not have buddies around you while you play. 

post #6 of 11

Great post and answers by everyone and it's lots of fun to read everyone's insights.  Teaching the game for 33 years, this is something I get asked nearly every day with one of my own students.  Great question, should you play in between lessons or not.  I like working through the swing with a student and they know that after just 1 or 2 lessons that their swing might not be complete yet.  We've improved lots of things but maybe there are some we haven't touched on yet.  When they ask about playing I tell them the same as some of the other posts.  Go out and play and have fun but your swing might not be there yet since you haven't worked on it enough yet.  Most folks tend to go back to their 'old' swing when the get on the course.  Their new swing hasn't clicked in yet.  I think as long as they know that then they're not expecting any miracles.  Some of them do improve the very first time they try their new swing on the course.  Kind of depends on what we're working on and what changes we needed to make.  Time on the range is more productive since they can work on the new move over and over but is is rewarding when they can do the new thing on the real course.  Good luck with your game and keep us all informed.

Steve

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
My second lesson was cancelled 45 minutes before start time and after I had already driven 30 minutes luckily a friend was already there so I got in with them. Overall I would say I played much worse but the difference was I now know when I make a bad shot more of what happened so I would say it was a success. I was gonna ask as well. He suggested that I have my weight back far enough at setup with a driver that I be able to pick my left foot up. I felt like this almost exaggerated some of the slic problems I have. What is your weight distribition at address with a driver? I also noticed my knee was pretty sore after when I stood straight up like for whatever reason I was locking it violently in my swing. I took alot of good away from my lesson but the weight that far back just doesnt feel right. What do you think?
post #8 of 11

I like about 60% of the weight on the back foot at address.  Picking up the left foot entirely is extreme but maybe your teacher was working on a feel with you or something.  I do teach, as Venturi, Hogan and Nelson all wrote about to have your weight a bit toward your heels at address.  A great checkpoint that's in all of their books is to be able to wiggle your toes at address.  Baseball, tennis and every other sport has your weight on the balls of your feet but golf is different because you don't go 'run after' the ball after you hit it.  I'm about 50/50 with my weight on mid irons and then go a bit more on the front leg for the high clubs.  Sounds like you're doing great.

S.

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
My biggest problem at this point is talking myself out of trying to kill the ball. If I can slow myself down I am ok. Easier said than done
post #10 of 11

Here is something you might try:  Instead of trying to swing easier, try to swing twice as hard as you do now. The disastrous results "might" make you want to slow it down and in the process become comfortable with the idea. Just the effort in slowing down especially if you get immediate positive feedback, just might work.  Not saying it will, only it might.  Try it!

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post
 

Here is something you might try:  Instead of trying to swing easier, try to swing twice as hard as you do now. The disastrous results "might" make you want to slow it down and in the process become comfortable with the idea. Just the effort in slowing down especially if you get immediate positive feedback, just might work.  Not saying it will, only it might.  Try it!

 

As an addition to this, you can always take one club up from what you would usually hit. Take a 7-iron instead of an 8 for example, which requires you to slow down at least a little so that you avoid flying the green.

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