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Does this annoy anyone else as well? - Page 4

post #55 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayG View Post


Walking to a tee box WITHOUT a tee to scrounge around for a tee is just wrong. If you at least HAVE one ready and see another, well, fine.

 

Well, when you put it that way, I suppose it is pretty egregious, despicable behavior to spend 4-5 seconds or so looking around for a broken tee, bending over, picking it up and walking a step or two to the center of the tee box. Forget the fact that on a weekend morning, there's usually a five minute wait for the group ahead as it approachees the green and putts out, or if the course is not busy, there may be no one behind us. I'm sure it backs up the whole course behind me for hours every time I commit this unpardonable sin.... Or it could be that like 95% of golfers, I've got 3-4 tees of varying lengths in my pocket so if I can't find a broken one in a few seconds, I grab a new short one out of my pocket at the same time I get a ball. I'd say I find an unbroken tee on at least 3 tee boxes a round as I walk off toward the cart or toward my ball, not because I'm wasting time scrounging around for one but because there are typically so many of them lying about. I think a lot of people also pick up perfectly good tees they find, not because they are so financially depleted by buying equipment that they cannot afford so they have to skimp elsewhere, but because it simply makes sense to bend over to grab an occasional found tee and help clean the tee box of clutter. Ray, have you really ever known a single person with high end clubs who couldn't afford to buy tees, or did you just make that up?
post #56 of 101
Quote:

 

Quote:

 

This is just silly.  I always look for a broken tee to use when I'm teeing off with an iron and I've seen a lot of people do the same. Why bother with a new tee when teeing it up for an iron shot won't matter whether there is 2" of tee below ground level or only 3/4"?  And if I spot a whole tee as I'm walking off the teebox, I'm grabbing it, too - why wouldn't I ?  I've only bought a single bag of tees in the past decade.

Which begs the question.........what does breaking a tee say for your golf swing?  I have read varying opinions on that.  I tend to beak a tee most of the time, but more often than not, find a pristine tee on the tee box still stuck in the ground. Sometimes I can follow a group and find one on each and every tee box. I guess that person is really focused on his/her shot.

post #57 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post

Which begs the question.........what does breaking a tee say for your golf swing?  I have read varying opinions on that.  I tend to beak a tee most of the time, but more often than not, find a pristine tee on the tee box still stuck in the ground. Sometimes I can follow a group and find one on each and every tee box. I guess that person is really focused on his/her shot.

 

Nothing, I think.  I had some brittle natural wood tees that broke frequently with a driver.  I bought some softer ones and they break after 3 or 4 drives.  It seems somewhat rare for me to break a tee with an iron since I tee them up barely above the ground; have to hit it fat.

post #58 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post

what does breaking a tee say for your golf swing?

 

That the ground is firm and that your clubhead at least clipped a part of the tee itself. To assume it says much more than that is folly.

 

In other words, it doesn't say anything about your swing except that you didn't thin the ball off of the tee.

post #59 of 101

admittedly it is a moot point and for all intents and purposes not important unless you for some reason want to talk about cause and effect. Should you have nothing better to do, you could google it and get a couple of different takes on it that directly relate to the swing. In that regard, its not folly, but would serve to satisfy an idle curiosity, or muse, or whatever. But you are right....who cares?

post #60 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post

admittedly it is a moot point and for all intents and purposes not important unless you for some reason want to talk about cause and effect. Should you have nothing better to do, you could google it and get a couple of different takes on it that directly relate to the swing. In that regard, its not folly, but would serve to satisfy an idle curiosity, or muse, or whatever. But you are right....who cares?

 

James, put the kibosh on the 'tude. Yes, I'm right that "whether your tee breaks or not" says little to nothing about your swing.

 

Go search Google for chemtrails or something. You'll find plenty of people with a "different take" on chemtrails. But the truth exists, and I suspect anyone who believes the government is "spraying us with stuff" has been smelling too many chemicals of different varieties.

post #61 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post

Which begs the question.........what does breaking a tee say for your golf swing?  I have read varying opinions on that.  I tend to beak a tee most of the time, but more often than not, find a pristine tee on the tee box still stuck in the ground. Sometimes I can follow a group and find one on each and every tee box. I guess that person is really focused on his/her shot.

Bigger picture wise, none.   

 

But those who are in business of selling brush tee argue that there is XYZ yard difference between different types of tees.   Along the same line, I read a ball manufacturing company's white paper on using "aged" ball as a bad thing.   Apparently, even a new ball unused for 5 years sitting in a box will lose a few yards on drives.   Again, even if it is true (which I seriously doubt), bigger picture wise, I don't think it matters much.

post #62 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post

Which begs the question.........what does breaking a tee say for your golf swing?

 

it says a lot about how firm the turf is more than anything I'd think

post #63 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkim291968 View Post

Apparently, even a new ball unused for 5 years sitting in a box will lose a few yards on drives.   Again, even if it is true (which I seriously doubt), bigger picture wise, I don't think it matters much.

 

It's probably true, but I agree that a few yards won't matter much to most people (unless they're a PGA Tour pro and it's Sunday).

post #64 of 101

This doesn't bother me in the least.  I have friends that have money and dropping that kind of money on a hobby is nothing.  If that's what you want to do, then do it.  I have played expensive setups pretty much the whole time I have played, BUT I bought them used from various golf websites.  They look brand new but they aren't.  Maybe this is what you are seeing.  My last set for instance was a used but traded in set of Mizuno MP32s.  They looked as good as any I saw on the shelf but I only gave 300.00 for them at the time. So just because you see these setups doesn't automatically mean they are brand new.

 

Pro V1s?  Why not?  I have a friend that has the ugliest swing, not much swing speed, couldn't get out of the 90s, BUT he never lost a ball.  They were always in the fairway and always found. So he plays more expensive balls. They're probably not ideal for his swing, but he likes the feel and the name gives him a little bit of confidence.

 

I for one look at everyone's clubs.  It's just me.  If I'm playing with you, I know what you are hitting.  I am an equipment junky and I like to look.  So I think it's pretty cool when guys come up with the latest and greatest so I can check them out.  Doesn't really mean he will beat me or that I need to run out and by them. 

 

I am also one that can afford what I buy (although I have played with the same clubs for probably 10 years or better) including clubs, balls, tees, etc....but I STILL will look for used tees on the box before dipping into my stash.  Why not?  They are there and will work just as well as mine.  They are free.  Doesn't mean I can't afford a bag or that I'm trying to save money because of a piece of expensive equipment I've bought.

 

I personally think that some people just look too deep into these things. In my opinion, a guy that goes out and buys new equipment because that's what he wants is really not much different than a guy that hangs on to old technology just so he can talk about the guys that are spending the money.  Technology makes a difference....why not get a piece of it??

post #65 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by TN94z View Post

This doesn't bother me in the least.  I have friends that have money and dropping that kind of money on a hobby is nothing.  If that's what you want to do, then do it.  I have played expensive setups pretty much the whole time I have played, BUT I bought them used from various golf websites.  They look brand new but they aren't.  Maybe this is what you are seeing.  My last set for instance was a used but traded in set of Mizuno MP32s.  They looked as good as any I saw on the shelf but I only gave 300.00 for them at the time. So just because you see these setups doesn't automatically mean they are brand new.

 

Pro V1s?  Why not?  I have a friend that has the ugliest swing, not much swing speed, couldn't get out of the 90s, BUT he never lost a ball.  They were always in the fairway and always found. So he plays more expensive balls. They're probably not ideal for his swing, but he likes the feel and the name gives him a little bit of confidence.

 

I for one look at everyone's clubs.  It's just me.  If I'm playing with you, I know what you are hitting.  I am an equipment junky and I like to look.  So I think it's pretty cool when guys come up with the latest and greatest so I can check them out.  Doesn't really mean he will beat me or that I need to run out and by them. 

 

I am also one that can afford what I buy (although I have played with the same clubs for probably 10 years or better) including clubs, balls, tees, etc....but I STILL will look for used tees on the box before dipping into my stash.  Why not?  They are there and will work just as well as mine.  They are free.  Doesn't mean I can't afford a bag or that I'm trying to save money because of a piece of expensive equipment I've bought.

 

I personally think that some people just look too deep into these things. In my opinion, a guy that goes out and buys new equipment because that's what he wants is really not much different than a guy that hangs on to old technology just so he can talk about the guys that are spending the money.  Technology makes a difference....why not get a piece of it??


My point exactly although you did so more eloquently. 

 

And my other point, less whining (about other golfers), and more playing (enjoy their company).

post #66 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strandly View Post
 

 

Nothing, I think.  I had some brittle natural wood tees that broke frequently with a driver.  I bought some softer ones and they break after 3 or 4 drives.  It seems somewhat rare for me to break a tee with an iron since I tee them up barely above the ground; have to hit it fat.

I am much more likely to break a tee with an iron, or even a fairway wood, than I am with a driver (and it's not a close contest).

 

I very often play all day with the same tee for my driver.

 

The reason is very simple. When I tee the ball up for a driver it's barely in the ground and there's a positive AOA. When I tee the ball up for anything else the tee is at least an inch (or more) into the ground and there's a negative AOA. If the ground is firm at all it will break more often than not because it's going down through the ball.

 

Like this:

post #67 of 101

I was using really long tees for hitting my driver, 3 1/4" so I had a ton of tee in the ground is why.

post #68 of 101

Exactly. I probably should have reframed the question to indicate what it says about a driiver swing. There was no attitude involved whatsoever other than maybe to point out that some can not accept anybody questioning them and even so, there was not a hint of even that. Whatever, its insignificant, but did get one or two to thinking about it. A sweeping, upwards swing would if anything pop a tee out of the ground rather than breaking it. If the tee breaks, does not necessarily mean that the shot was not executed properly but merely not at enough angle. to lift the tee I try to respect everybody's opinion, but at the same time do not regard that opinion as absolute fact just because they say so nor do I expect that they regard mine as such. My question was only because a previous post got me to thinking about something somebody somewhere or other once commented on. It was not folly at all., not important either to which I already acknowledged

 

 

quote:

Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 

I am much more likely to break a tee with an iron, or even a fairway wood, than I am with a driver (and it's not a close contest).

 

I very often play all day with the same tee for my driver.

 

The reason is very simple. When I tee the ball up for a driver it's barely in the ground and there's a positive AOA. When I tee the ball up for anything else the tee is at least an inch (or more) into the ground and there's a negative AOA. If the ground is firm at all it will break more often than not because it's going down through the ball.

 

Like this:

 

 

..

post #69 of 101

HJ, I'm not going to go on about it, but you and I both know that's bull. Enough of the 'tude dude.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post
 

A sweeping, upwards swing would if anything pop a tee out of the ground rather than breaking it.

 

Or it could snap the tee. Or just push it forward. Or flatten it against the ground.

 

Golf tees are made of a variety of materials (even the wood ones - there are Stinger tees, thicker wood tees, tees made with different kinds of wood, painted tees, urethane tees, natural (uncoated) tees, etc.), of different lengths, and are used in different ground conditions. The deformation of the golf ball alone can drive a tee downward into the ground, or flip a tee out of the ground. I've seen high-speed video where the leading edge of the clubhead snapped the tee right beneath the "flanged" part. The AoA of the club, where it's struck on the face, the size of the driver head, and several other things all play a role on something as stupid as "Does your tee break or does it pop up out of the ground?"

 

Having spent time with a Phantom camera, a Flightscope and Trackman, PGA Tour level and mini-tour level players, scratch golfers, 18 handicap golfers, beginner golfers, etc. I can say this: what the tee does has far more to do with the condition of the tee and the ground than anything else at all.

 

And come to think of it, you can just attend a PGA Tour event, or watch players on the range: PGA Tour players break tees, they pop tees up in the air, they leave tees almost undisturbed. All three. And they all hit the ball a lot better than you, me, or anyone else posting here.

 

Furthermore, for some players, they want to hit slightly down or perhaps level with the driver. That's what produces the best tee shots for them. Though I do feel (opinion, based on what I know) that most amateurs will benefit from hitting up 2-5°, many good players and a good number of REALLY good players prefer to hit slightly down.

 

In summary, I'll restate my opinion: what a tee does has little to nothing to do with the quality or nature of the swing.

 

If you can prove any of that "wrong," be my guest.

post #70 of 101

All I know is that every driver swing on the range results in either a broken tee or one that goes flying too far to pick up.

 

During my round after hitting the range, I generally use 2 tees, a short one for the par 3s and one for the other 14 holes.

post #71 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhySoSerious View Post

So many reasons as to why I prefer to play golf by myself........

^Best argument made in this thread yet.

I also think I am going to become a golf tee whisperer as it sounds like the tees have something to say.
post #72 of 101

A lot of tee breakage depends on the firmness of the ground.  I grew up playing NYC public courses with rock hard, bare dirt, teeing grounds and it was almost impossible to avoid breaking a tee on those grounds.  It was also pretty hard to get the tee to go into the ground in the first place.

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