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Are sgi irons a bad idea?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I have only been playing about four months and looking for some irons. I went and hit the adams idea a12 os and cobra baffler. I liked them both but leaning toward the a12 for the hybrids. I was doing a little more research online and found a few people claiming sgi was a bad idea because they are outgrown quickly and can cause you to develop bad habits because they are so foregiving. What is your take? Is it a bad Idea? Should I go with a game improvement set as they suggested? If so what are some examples of gi irons as apposed to what I have been told are sgi in the a12 and baffler? I have also been considerin an a12 os complete set stiff. Any thoughts? Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 21
Thread Starter 
Also just as an fyi I am taking lessons and have many flaws and inconsistencies and do not expect new clubs to fix it just looking for something that is reliable and last me a while. Thanks
post #3 of 21
In my opinion sgi clubs are great for the 1st 2 or 3 season of learning to play. I made the mistake towards the end of my 1st season jumping to a gi iron set from the Callaway x22 i was using.
post #4 of 21

Based on my own experience, If you have some athletic ability and are commited to learning the game and improve your scores, go straight to game improvement irons, such as Ping G25.

post #5 of 21

Adams A12OS is a great set.  You might outgrow them in about 10 years if you become a scratch golfer or when you get tired of hitting your 5 hybrid 190 yards and sticking it on the green.  Until then expect to hit your fair share of chunks and dribblers just like with anything else.  I think in general newbies will be better off spending time learning to master hybrids rather than long irons as they continue to gain dominance even at the higher levels of competition.

 

New A12OS sets, by the way, can be had for a steal on the bay right now.

post #6 of 21

Buy slightly preowned -

 

Nothing wrong with SGI.

 

Some guys think they make you lazy because you're not prone to concentrate if the club does it for you. In my experience, the club doesn't do it for you. You've got to have relaxed focus. As you get better, you may not need all the help or want irons that are more pleasing to your eye. 

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
There is a complete set with speedline driver a12os 3and5 fw 456h and 7-g mallet putter and cart bag for 532. Sounded like a good dealto me. Thanks for the input guys!
post #8 of 21

You need to go with clubs you can hit in the here-and-now.

 

If you buy forged Player's irons because you visualize yourself as a 10 HDCP, in two years, you may be very disappointed in what happens.

 

You switch out of SGI clubs when they start holding you back: You can't hit certain types of shots because of the irons.

 

Pro tour players have both scored wins playing SGI irons: Colin Montgomerie won playing Big Berthas, and Rocco Mediate won playing X22s. (Note: the particular irons they paid did not have the stock SGI shafts...)

post #9 of 21

I agree... forget brand new and purchase a used set for now.

post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by arturo28mx View Post

Based on my own experience, If you have some athletic ability and are commited to learning the game and improve your scores, go straight to game improvement irons, such as Ping G25.

 

How do the Ping G25's compare to the Ping G20's?

post #11 of 21

Id say SGI irons are a great idea.  They allow you to mishit the ball a bit and still get away with hitting a great shot.  There are those who believe that SGI irons dont have the feel or workability of players' irons but personally, I feel that feel and working the ball isnt all there is and that unless you are a scratch player with SGI irons, you have no business playing players' irons or blades.

Id go so far as to say that the majority of people who crow about feel and workability are the same people who cant remember the last time they hit the green in regulation and hack it around the course in 120 most of the time.

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmanbooyaa View Post

In my opinion sgi clubs are great for the 1st 2 or 3 season of learning to play. I made the mistake towards the end of my 1st season jumping to a gi iron set from the Callaway x22 i was using.

I wish I had started my son on a set of SGI clubs, I got him a really great set of X20's that were next to new to learn on I think it was a mistake now I look back on it.

It you can learn the game and have fun with getting the ball in the air down that fairway you will be a much happier person. That is what SGI clubs will do for you, buy used, use them for a couple years and move on to a set that is fitted for you.

All this is just MO from seeing him struggle a bit and thinking he would pick the game up faster then he did.

To me what ever is going to make the game fun and lower your score is all that matters. 

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by hacker101 View Post

I wish I had started my son on a set of SGI clubs, I got him a really great set of X20's that were next to new to learn on I think it was a mistake now I look back on it. ...

 

When they came out, X20s were an SGI iron head with a midlaunch, Uniflex shaft (between R and S in flex). Maybe a more helpful shaft was needed.

post #14 of 21

Another vote for buying equipment that helps you play the best you can. My experience is golf is rarely fun for the golfer that struggles endlessly. It's more than the score it's the lack of confidence that comes with inconsistency being the only thing consistent.

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post

Another vote for buying equipment that helps you play the best you can. My experience is golf is rarely fun for the golfer that struggles endlessly. It's more than the score it's the lack of confidence that comes with inconsistency being the only thing consistent.


Not to mention its not fun to play bad golf all the time.

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

 

When they came out, X20s were an SGI iron head with a midlaunch, Uniflex shaft (between R and S in flex). Maybe a more helpful shaft was needed.

I agree with the shaft, I was sure with him being young his swing would have picked up fast and the shaft would have been a good fit, it just has not.

Also I thought the Big Bertha was there SGI not the X20's? 

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by hacker101 View Post

I agree with the shaft, I was sure with him being young his swing would have picked up fast and the shaft would have been a good fit, it just has not.

Also I thought the Big Bertha was there SGI not the X20's? 


Correct.  X20's are somewhat shorter toe-to-heel than a lot of others.  Actually close to Titleist 755s in size.

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tee2Trees View Post


Correct.  X20's are somewhat shorter toe-to-heel than a lot of others.  Actually close to Titleist 755s in size.

When i got them and not know how much he would play I bought used. Great club bad shaft for a beginner like him for sure, even now I will be selling them in a couple months and having him fitted. I wish I had known about this site when I got them, there is great advise here.

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