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putting woes

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Whenever I find myself 3putting and mis hitting putts I always ditch the new mallet aand break out the old Dunlop blade. Is it just me or is tbere something magical about old school blades that just seem to work? Theres a lot to be said about simplicity in this game when you think about it......lol
post #2 of 15

I think a lot of it is what fits your eye and the feel.  I personally can't stand the bigger putters and prefer to use the blade style. It seems like every time I have tried any of the bigger mallet style putters, my alignment is off.  It's almost like the putter feels unbalanced and it causes the head to turn in a way that doesn't fit my eye.  I'm sure that may just be me, but that's my take on it.  I'm the same way with my irons. I can't stand looking down and seeing it thick top line. The thinner blade style irons or muscle backs are much more appealing to my tastes.

post #3 of 15

Great post above and I sure agree.  Most of the new putters are the bigger ones, mallets, etc.and they've sure helped folks out, but if they don't match your eye or you don't like the feel of them it'll be hard for you.  3-putting is usually a speed thing.  Most folks don't hit the ball 10-feet off line but they do leave it 10 feet long or short don't they?  Even high handicappers don't aim that bad but they do struggle with their touch.  There are certainly plenty of drills I'm sure you've read about that can help you with you touch.  With my students I like laying a club on the ground about 3 feet behind the hole and then practicing some long putts.  See if you can get the ball to or past the hole but not so far that you hit the club.  A few minutes of this and you'll start dialing in your touch.  Be great if you posted of video of your stroke so I, and the others can help you out.

Good luck and keep us informed.

Steve

post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by leftygolferman View Post
 

Great post above and I sure agree.  Most of the new putters are the bigger ones, mallets, etc.and they've sure helped folks out, but if they don't match your eye or you don't like the feel of them it'll be hard for you.  I'm a full time golf instructor and a PGA Master Professional down in Ft. Myers, Florida.  3-putting is usually a speed thing.  Most folks don't hit the ball 10-feet off line but they do leave it 10 feet long or short don't they?  Even high handicappers don't aim that bad but they do struggle with their touch.  There are certainly plenty of drills I'm sure you've read about that can help you with you touch.  With my students I like laying a club on the ground about 3 feet behind the hole and then practicing some long putts.  See if you can get the ball to or past the hole but not so far that you hit the club.  A few minutes of this and you'll start dialing in your touch.  Be great if you posted of video of your stroke so I, and the others can help you out.

Good luck and keep us informed.

Steve

You don't have to keep saying this if you don't want.  We get it.  Although if you want to keep saying it, go ahead.  

post #5 of 15

I feel more consistent with a mallet but my PPR is starting to go up. But for me it has more to do with hitting more GIR than anything. I'm scoring better despite more 3 putts. Many coming on par 3's. It's my approach shots that suck and the difficult greens at my new home course make it tough for the inaccurate. The third putt just replaced my former chip.

post #6 of 15

Great and thanks.  New to the site so wasn't sure if one post is connected to all the others.

S.

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post
 

I feel more consistent with a mallet but my PPR is starting to go up. But for me it has more to do with hitting more GIR than anything. I'm scoring better despite more 3 putts. Many coming on par 3's. It's my approach shots that suck and the difficult greens at my new home course make it tough for the inaccurate. The third putt just replaced my former chip.

There's a definite trade-off, many holes at my home course have large greens with different tiers.  On those holes I typically score better if I chip close to the hole versus achieving GIR and landing on the wrong spot on the green.   I obviously have to spend more time on lag putting so I'm not always leaving myself a low percentage 2nd putt in those situations.

post #8 of 15

I never blame the putter because I know it is me.  What I do is tell myself to forget the past putts and focus on relaxing and getting the speed right. Putting in a relaxed mode really helps.

post #9 of 15

You're right on with this line of thinking, good job.  Yes, your last shot or putt is done, over and in the past and there's nothing you can do to change it.  So many of my great college players that I work with are constantly working on the same thing. We have to key on the mental side and how they must get over a bad shot.  You've sure played with guys that hit a few bad shots and stay mad the rest of the round.  They always said about Nicklaus that he could make an eagle or a triple bogey and by the next shot his expressioin was the same.  He never got too high or too low.  Some of the posts on other topics have been talking about Jason Dufner's waggle.  He looks loose as a goose and then just swings so he gets rid of all the tension he might have.  Do some of the touch drills on the practice green and if you like your pro have him take a quick look at your set up, grip and stroke.

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Not me, I always blame the golf club. Haha...but in all seriousness the 20 dollar putter just feels better to me than my new 130 dollar putter.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Its going on ebay today in fact.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Micah View Post

Whenever I find myself 3putting and mis hitting putts I always ditch the new mallet aand break out the old Dunlop blade. Is it just me or is tbere something magical about old school blades that just seem to work? Theres a lot to be said about simplicity in this game when you think about it......lol

 

I'm sure that's true. I started working on my putting this summer. The first thing I did was cut down a putter to what I thought was a better length for me - around 33". Since I barely have the courage of my convictions, I cut down my least favourite, least expensive putter - an old bullseye style blade that had been thrown in with a set of second-hand clubs. I shortened it, added a BUNCH of lead tape to the head to bring it up to around 330g, and stuck a bog standard round Lamkin grip on it. And I got down to practicing my lag putting.

 

Well, since then, it's become my favourite putter - and I don't really feel confident with any of my supposedly more forgiving Pings. I'll be playing my club medal tomorrow with what looks like a vandalised museum piece.

 

So, if historically a simple blade is what you've practiced a lot with, it makes sense to me that you might revert to that.

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
The putter is a TD Plus Dunlop TDP-2 to be exact and its just perfectly balanced for me. I remember gaming it in the late 90s...lol. Not sure why I stopped but Ilater played a nice blade style Ping for a while. Peer pressure.....all my buddies are gaming a scotty c or an odyssey mallet. Never go for the fairway sales pitch. Go with what works and feels right.
post #14 of 15

Hey Folks,

I use a blade putter also -an old Ben Crenshaw classic, the Acushnet Bullseye! It's like an old friend.  The light-weight nature forces me to keep a light grip and really stay relaxed over the ball.  I use the slightest forward press to insure I'm stroking the ball for a true roll.  If you like your putter, it's a GOOD PUTTER!

 

If anyone is interested in putting routines, I put one together down below. It's made a huge difference in my life, thinking about acceleration through the shot, and accountability to make so many in a row of certain kinds of putts.

Also, it's a great measure of a great question: How good a putter are you really? Perhaps you are better than you thought! Maybe not. 

Note: Use this guide as a practice guide, and if you are a high-handicapper, try to check off only a few boxes each time. 

My 2 cents!

 

The Putting Practice Routine:

Putting Practice Checklist - Do your routine each time to really make each putt count! Increased focus will yield great results!! Stay with it! Add to this list if you have a particular weakness to work on. This may take some time. Perhaps you’ll only be able to check one box in a practice session. Great! Next time, go for two. The key is to use this chart as a tool - use it as YOU need.

 

  • 3-Foot uphill putts - 10 in a row

  • 3-Foot downhill putts - 10 in a row

  • 3-Foot Sidehill - 10 in a row

 

WAY TO GO! Now stay focused and continue!!

  • 5-Foot straight uphill putts - 4 in a row  (5 for mid-low handicapper)

  • 5-Foot with slight break back toward feet - 4 in a row (5 for mid-low handicapper)

  • 5-Foot break the other way - 4 in a row (5 for mid-low handicapper)

 

YOU ARE ROCKIN! Remember to read each putt, and follow your routine!

 

  • 7-Foot straight uphill - 2 in a row for high handicapper, 3 for mid-range/low

  • 7-Foot sidehill R-L -  2 in a row for high handicapper, 3 for mid-range/low

  • 7-Foot L-R -  2 in a row for high handicapper, 3 for mid-range/low

 

A great accomplishment!  Now feel the surge of confidence to tackle 10-Footers!

  • 10-Foot straight on flat - 5 in a row made or just past

(if short or more than 2 feet past, start over)

  • 10-Foot straight with slight break - 5 in a row made or just past

            (if short or more than 2 feet past, start over)

  • 10 Foot downhill - 5 in a row made or just past

            (if short or more than 2 feet past, start over)

 

Now take 10 steps from the cup - 25-30 feet. Here’s your long putt routine:

Crouch behind to get line, like all other putts. Pick your spot. Look at a place on your line about 10 feet from the cup. Walk over there and practice swing at your putt to see how it breaks close to the hole. Find your spot, line up clubhead, take two practice swings looking at the hole, breathe while looking back at ball, focus on making it, and stroke it!

Be that rare golfer who has a routine, and actually gets better!

 

  • 30-Foot with little break - 3 in a row no more than 1 foot short and 4 feet long, 2 feet left or right (low handicappers go for 4 or 5 in a row - how many can you get?)

  • 30-Foot uphill with some break - same rules as above

  • 30-Foot downhill with some break - same rules

post #15 of 15
I love the opportunistic game of chance that putting can be during a round but in all honesty find drills boring.

I recently bought a book with my sons in mind and to pass away the time in winter.

Its called The little book of indoor golf games by Andrew Winter. It just has some fun little games involving the use of tees and playing cards. Very creative ideas to make putting practice fun. Great for the kids too.

Regarding putters I have always disliked the mallet putter some are just huge. When I was a kid they were all blade anyway.
Mine is considered a half mallet but probably would pass for a blade now.
It feels heavy compared to other putters but its all down to feel, I had a head heavy tennis racquet, snooker cue , and my irons are on the heavier side.
Feel and attitude to putting are more important than technique but I agree you do need some kind of a practice plan.
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