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Anti-whining thread - what I like about "other" golfers .... - Page 2

post #19 of 38
Well, right now my favorite golfer is my daughter. She's been taking lessons for two years and has had some occasional highlights, including an 80-yard 7-iron as a 6 year-old last summer and a comment from one of the highschool kids who served as assistant coaches in a local kids golf league that she was hitting the ball better than some of the 10 year olds, but an inconsistent back swing that often gets pretty vertical and a tendency to aim way to the right have hindered her progress a bit. As is the case with many younger kids, she is also very resistent to any sort of advice, coaching or other input from mom or day on any sport, too, so it's hard to help her improve her play. I took her out to a local muny par-3 last night that offers free golf for kids on Sunday afternoons. On a 170 yard hole my tee shot was so bad it was comical, coming off the toe , ricocheting backward twice and coming to a rest under a tree slightly behind the tee box, completely unplayable. In contrast, she hit a 50 yard hybrid, a 40 yard 7-iron, both in the fairway, and as we stood in the fairway 80 yards out, I told her "You can definitely hit the green from here - I know you can do it!" Surprisingly, she let me adjust her aim about 30 degrees left, asked me if her practice swing was round instead of too vertical, then swung a terrific swing with a crisp click on the clubface. Her ball arced down the fairway, hit the front of the green, and came to rest 9 inches off the green in the back. She missed her bogey putt by only 3" and ended up beating me, legitimately, by two strokes on the hole. Altogether, she had seven shots of 70 yards or better, she let me give her a few pointers without complaint and even asked me for advice a few times. On the last hole we played, a 90 yard par-3, she was pin-high just off the green with her little hybrid. I managed to have two pitches and 9-iron (which honestly looked like it might have gone in the hole) to within 10 feet which impressed the heck out of her and we exchanged a bunch of high-fives. At the end of the round I asked her if it was fun hitting so many good shots and she nodded her head vigorously and gave me a hug, saying "Thank you Daddy for taking me out today! I loved this course!"
post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisguy View Post

Well, right now my favorite golfer is my daughter. She's been taking lessons for two years and has had some occasional highlights, including an 80-yard 7-iron as a 6 year-old last summer and a comment from one of the highschool kids who served as assistant coaches in a local kids golf league that she was hitting the ball better than some of the 10 year olds, but an inconsistent back swing that often gets pretty vertical and a tendency to aim way to the right have hindered her progress a bit. As is the case with many younger kids, she is also very resistent to any sort of advice, coaching or other input from mom or day on any sport, too, so it's hard to help her improve her play. I took her out to a local muny par-3 last night that offers free golf for kids on Sunday afternoons. On a 170 yard hole my tee shot was so bad it was comical, coming off the toe , ricocheting backward twice and coming to a rest under a tree slightly behind the tee box, completely unplayable. In contrast, she hit a 50 yard hybrid, a 40 yard 7-iron, both in the fairway, and as we stood in the fairway 80 yards out, I told her "You can definitely hit the green from here - I know you can do it!" Surprisingly, she let me adjust her aim about 30 degrees left, asked me if her practice swing was round instead of too vertical, then swung a terrific swing with a crisp click on the clubface. Her ball arced down the fairway, hit the front of the green, and came to rest 9 inches off the green in the back. She missed her bogey putt by only 3" and ended up beating me, legitimately, by two strokes on the hole. Altogether, she had seven shots of 70 yards or better, she let me give her a few pointers without complaint and even asked me for advice a few times. On the last hole we played, a 90 yard par-3, she was pin-high just off the green with her little hybrid. I managed to have two pitches and 9-iron (which honestly looked like it might have gone in the hole) to within 10 feet which impressed the heck out of her and we exchanged a bunch of high-fives. At the end of the round I asked her if it was fun hitting so many good shots and she nodded her head vigorously and gave me a hug, saying "Thank you Daddy for taking me out today! I loved this course!"
Excellent! Makes me look forward to taking my little one out next year, hes only 9 but I'm thinking that's a good age to start, I did 9 holes last week with friends, we always walk courses but this time I booked a buggy and brought my boy along, I let him drive me round and whilst teaching him about etiquette, he loved it and now wants lessons! That was the whole idea! I've now got him a 7 iron and taking him to the range next week! We're both looking forward to it!!
post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisguy View Post

Well, right now my favorite golfer is my daughter. She's been taking lessons for two years...... At the end of the round I asked her if it was fun hitting so many good shots and she nodded her head vigorously and gave me a hug, saying "Thank you Daddy for taking me out today! I loved this course!"

Congratulation on finding a life-long golf partner, (or at least until they go to college and then move away to find a career).  My daughter, Kelly, started golfing at age 11 with lessons at community college, and at age 13 began caddying at Oakmont Country Club (with me).

 

Once Kelly began striking the ball consistently we moved beyond the par 3 courses and played 9 hole with the following format...

  1) We both hit a drive;

  2) For the second shot I would hit Kelly's drive and she would hit mine;

  3) Then I let Kelly pick the ball she wanted and we finished the hole;

  4) We would play match play to see who would win with the loser buying  buy ice cream. (I guess you know what that result was! - Win or lose I bought the ice cream.)

 

Eventually Kelly got to high school, lettered for four years on the girls varsity team, won her section title, then went to college and got her MBA in five years.  Now we play only when she comes home or in the summer, or when the entire family meets at an agreed upon location, (usually at a beach resort).

 

Best of luck and enjoy these days golfing with your daughter.

post #22 of 38

My usual partner is my son in law, and as we are usually a twosome we get hooked up with another one or two each time we play. We have played with a good assortment of fellows, some younger, some older, some better, some not so skilled... but nearly all we have played with have been congenial, good natured and fun to be with.

 

Sefa, my son in law is a native of a south pacific island and his english is a little rough, but his natural gregariousness is contagious. He is a bit self conscious of his immigrant status, but has been made to feel welcome by all the staff on the course and everyone we have shared a round with.

 

Golf is a great game that attracts great folks!

post #23 of 38
Thread Starter 

I am pondering early retirement.   Good thing about golf is that I meet a lot of retired folks.   I have been collecting stories and information on life after work from them.   They are more than willing to share their experience.

post #24 of 38

I have a buddy who considers it a failure if he doesn't empty the sand jug on the cart by the time we make the turn.  He spends the time waiting for the green to clear filling divot holes, drops off the empty and grabs a full jug from the rack near the 10th tee, and usually empties that by the time we finish.  His example even has the rest of us doing it more often too.  :beer:

post #25 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

I have a buddy who considers it a failure if he doesn't empty the sand jug on the cart by the time we make the turn.  He spends the time waiting for the green to clear filling divot holes, drops off the empty and grabs a full jug from the rack near the 10th tee, and usually empties that by the time we finish.  His example even has the rest of us doing it more often too.  :beer:

 

We need more of those folks, especially, on muni courses.   When I am waiting on tee box, I fix divots but probably not often enough.

post #26 of 38

Hey what a nice change from the usual complaint threads.

 

I like it when strangers in my foursome help me look for a ball or compliment a shot.  I also find it flattering when they ask me to watch their swing and tell them if there seems to be any big problems.  The latter usually doesn't occur after the former.

 

Offering to buy beer is a plus but I'd never take one up on it.

 

Asking if I'd like to finish before raking my "3 foot tap in" ball away from the hole.

 

Having a good sense of humor on bad shots.

 

High fiving after good shots even if I miss the birdie putt.

post #27 of 38

Just the fact that playing with strangers helps keep me even tempered. I'm more likely to get upset and play worse by myself than if someone joins me or I join them.

post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkim291968 View Post
 

 I was feeling crappy throughout the round b/c of my sub-par play.   With a final handshake and a little bit of encouragement, he made me feel better.

 

 

sub-par golf?  isnt that what we all want?  what the hell is your problem?  lol...JK!!!

post #29 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by colin007 View Post
 

 

 

sub-par golf?  isnt that what we all want?  what the hell is your problem?  lol...JK!!!

 

LOL.   I do play on words but this one was unintentional.   Good catch.

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJBam View Post
 

Hey what a nice change from the usual complaint threads.

 

I like it when strangers in my foursome help me look for a ball or compliment a shot.  I also find it flattering when they ask me to watch their swing and tell them if there seems to be any big problems.  The latter usually doesn't occur after the former.

 

Offering to buy beer is a plus but I'd never take one up on it.

 

Asking if I'd like to finish before raking my "3 foot tap in" ball away from the hole.

 

Having a good sense of humor on bad shots.

 

High fiving after good shots even if I miss the birdie putt.

 

That's my first inclination as well.  I know how expensive the stuff is and I know I would never buy one for myself so I feel bad that someone is spending that much money on me.  I do have a funny story about this very thing though... I was playing a few weeks ago and got paired with a couple guys I didn't know.  They were buying drinks every few holes and I'm pretty sure they had a solid buzz at the turn when the cart girl came around again.  One of them offered to buy me a drink and I declined but he insisted and said he found 50 bucks in the parking lot right before the round.  This might be an old trick to get people to accept a friendly gesture but it was the first time I've heard it and I'll tell you what it worked like a charm.  I was like well shit I can't decline now or it looks like I'm saying I'm too good for his FREE money.  haha  Fun round though, I wouldn't mind running into those guys again.

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strandly View Post
 

 

One of them offered to buy me a drink and I declined but he insisted and said he found 50 bucks in the parking lot right before the round.  This might be an old trick to get people to accept a friendly gesture but it was the first time I've heard it and I'll tell you what it worked like a charm.  I was like well shit I can't decline now or it looks like I'm saying I'm too good for his FREE money.  haha  Fun round though, I wouldn't mind running into those guys again.

 

I like the story.  (Why is that when I find money in parking lot, it's only a quarter or nickel? :hmm:)

 

With me, others offered me snacks they brought.  Most of the time, I decline but someone would insist, saying that he brought too much.   I used similar reason to share snacks with others.  Except in our case, we usually did bring enough.  

post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 

I've played with a golfer who would look for lost balls while waiting.    Good thing about the guy was that he didn't collect the balls for himself as he only uses one type of ball.   Instead, he'd gather balls and leave them next to tee boxes so that others can take them.   

post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkim291968 View Post
 

I've played with a golfer who would look for lost balls while waiting.    Good thing about the guy was that he didn't collect the balls for himself as he only uses one type of ball.   Instead, he'd gather balls and leave them next to tee boxes so that others can take them.   

 

Maybe I should start doing that.  Right now, any balls I collect go into a side pocket and then I offer them to folks who need extra balls, because I only play Callaway Hex Black.  I rarely run into folks that need extra balls, so they are really weighing my bag down right now.

post #34 of 38
Thread Starter 

I ran into some bad experience with rude golfers lately while playing super twilight rounds on a local public course.  So much so that, we (me and my wife, and a dog named Julio down by the school yard ... ;-)) decided to join an upscale golf club ($$$$ yuck!) for all you can play yearly membership - less crowd, not in a rush to play as many holes (where rude behavior often comes in), excellent service.   This thread can use more "feel good" golfer stories to restore my faith in fellow golfers.   I am sure there are many good stories out there.

post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkim291968 View Post
 

I ran into some bad experience with rude golfers lately while playing super twilight rounds on a local public course.  So much so that, we (me and my wife, and a dog named Julio down by the school yard ... ;-)) decided to join an upscale golf club ($$$$ yuck!) for all you can play yearly membership - less crowd, not in a rush to play as many holes (where rude behavior often comes in), excellent service.   This thread can use more "feel good" golfer stories to restore my faith in fellow golfers.   I am sure there are many good stories out there.

 

Good golfer stories are much better when they don't start with rude golfer whines.

:whistle:

post #36 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post
 

 

Good golfer stories are much better when they don't start with rude golfer whines.

:whistle:

 

Guilty as charged :surrender:

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