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Im constantly misreading greens - Page 4

post #55 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by parallax View Post

Does he bring the chart to the green with him? Or is it possible to become experienced enough with it that you can forego the chart?

I can't speak for them but I've played plenty of rounds without using the charts. Once you have the skills and know what to look for, you can do a lot without them. You won't have down-to-the-inch reads, of course.
Quote:
Originally Posted by parallax View Post

Also, the main concern I have with Aimpoint is the ability to judge the slope angle, and correctly quantify it. The reason I have yet to take the class, is that I am not convinced that it is possible to accurately make such calculations.

You're not convinced that it is possible, or that you couldn't? Because it is possible, and not actually very difficult if you put in a bit of practice. People tend to pick up on it surprisingly fast.
Quote:
Originally Posted by parallax View Post

Another question is, is there a method for compensating for the angle of the slope where your ball lies? The more slope you have where your ball lies the sooner it will start to break.....

You can take a sort of average slope, yes.
post #56 of 77

Quote:

Originally Posted by parallax View Post


Does he bring the chart to the green with him? Or is it possible to become experienced enough with it that you can forego the chart?
 

 

If he's teaching someone I'm guessing he's showing them how to read the chart ;-)  You can get familiar with the numbers on the chart but it's always good to double check, only takes a few seconds.  All your work is done before you look at the chart.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by parallax View Post


Also, the main concern I have with Aimpoint is the ability to judge the slope angle, and correctly quantify it. The reason I have yet to take the class, is that I am not convinced that it is possible to accurately make such calculations.
 

 

Of course you can, most students get pretty good with it by the end of a class.  Just have to make sure you keep practicing it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by parallax View Post


Another question is, is there a method for compensating for the angle of the slope where your ball lies? The more slope you have where your ball lies the sooner it will start to break.....
 

Yes there is, you need to seriously take an AimPoint class.  

post #57 of 77

This is interesting, but by reading this thread - the one thing that hasn't been mentioned is that it seems to me you have to be an established putter for this type of system to work - meaning, you have to be able to hit your "lines" accurately and especially control your speed based on uphill/downhill lies and various stimp conditions.     This is not marketed for the high hcp player, amirite ?

post #58 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthehole View Post

This is interesting, but by reading this thread - the one thing that hasn't been mentioned is that it seems to me you have to be an established putter for this type of system to work - meaning, you have to be able to hit your "lines" accurately and especially control your speed based on uphill/downhill lies and various stimp conditions.     This is not marketed for the high hcp player, amirite ?
Can you name a single putting method that doesn't require being able to hit your lines and control your speed?

If you're having trouble with those two things then you should probably devote some serious practice time to this. The good news is is it's very easy to practice this. I used to throw beer coasters randomly around the room in my basement and putt to them, they're pretty close to "hole" size. I use three coasters and make it a game, play 18, two putt is a par and one putt is a birdie.

For speed I like the ladder drill.
post #59 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthehole View Post

This is interesting, but by reading this thread - the one thing that hasn't been mentioned is that it seems to me you have to be an established putter for this type of system to work - meaning, you have to be able to hit your "lines" accurately and especially control your speed based on uphill/downhill lies and various stimp conditions.     This is not marketed for the high hcp player, amirite ?

High handicappers often get more out of the class. They can start off on the right foot and the class shows ways to train distance control and line.

We see really good success with beginning kids too. They're wide open to the possibilities vas feel like they're "cheating" - and they are. They're skipping directly ahead to the right answer and missing out on all of the "building up experience."

I've said before and I'll say again now: AimPoint is often the best $200 you can spend if you want to get better at golf.
post #60 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

Agree with Erik, he read a few of my putts today with aimpoint, it works. Once you grasp the method, it's easy to visualize.

Yeah, wish I would have had some help with my putting that day.... I need to buy a mat or something to practice my putt stroke to even out the speed/tempo. So many 3 putts Saturday...
post #61 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Can you name a single putting method that doesn't require being able to hit your lines and control your speed?

 

Sheesh, I was just asking - seemed like a very advanced method the way it was being explained, didn't seem applicable for the high hcp player.    Erik corrected my thinking on that ... it works for everyone, even beginners.

post #62 of 77

The only problem you can get is, if a person doesn't believe their putting stroke is bad and just assumes they are miss reading putts. This is were Aim point can help as well. If they know aim point is right, and they use it correctly, and they are still missing putts, then a beginner can learn their putting stroke is bad. Also a lot of people will adapt. If consciously they know they are reading right, they will develop feel and make more putts overall.  If you couple this with getting a consistent putting stroke, then that's were a putting weakness becomes a strength. But reading putts has little to do with putting stroke, its just most amateurs would rather blame a miss putt on a miss read than a putting stroke.

 

For me on Saturday, with Erik reading some of my putts, i knew the line was good. But I could feel that some of the putts i hit the ball on the heel of the putter, and a couple others i just didn't start the ball correctly. One putt I did start right and hit it good, i drained a long putt for birdie. So accepting that miss hitting the putt is more of a problem than miss reading will help people learn what needs to be improved.

post #63 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthehole View Post
 

Sheesh, I was just asking - seemed like a very advanced method the way it was being explained, didn't seem applicable for the high hcp player.    Erik corrected my thinking on that ... it works for everyone, even beginners.

 

No "sheesh" required.

 

I was just encouraging you to work on your putting. You've long lamented the fact that your putting is holding you back so I'm suggesting you dedicate some serious time to improving. Putting is the easiest part of the game to improve at, even without Aimpoint just working on your feel for distance control can make a huge difference and its not something that is all that difficult to improve. If you can get your misses to stop within tap-in range it will mitigate the damage from bad reads.

 

It's all good...:-)

post #64 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthehole View Post
 

Sheesh, I was just asking - seemed like a very advanced method the way it was being explained, didn't seem applicable for the high hcp player.    Erik corrected my thinking on that ... it works for everyone, even beginners.

 

Yeah whether you have a "perfect" stroke or not, AImPoint will help your putting.  Knowing the break, knowing where you have to aim, makes it a lot easier.  Obviously making more putts is great but you'll also have less 3 putts.

post #65 of 77

i wouldnt worry about the putting stroke. putting is feel and needs to be your own personal thing. there are of course fundamentals like grip and setup, but the stroke isnt important. what you need to do is hit the ball somewhere near the hole on long putts, and try to make those 3 footers. reading greens is easy. you do what you normally do but dont overthink. just read if the slope is going to the left or right and how much. then you align properly, you hit the putt, and it either goes in or it doesnt. statistics show that pros dont even make 75 percent of 5 footers. so youre not a bad putter, it just needs to be automatic for you.

post #66 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by xerex250 View Post
 

i wouldnt worry about the putting stroke. putting is feel and needs to be your own personal thing. there are of course fundamentals like grip and setup, but the stroke isnt important. what you need to do is hit the ball somewhere near the hole on long putts, and try to make those 3 footers. reading greens is easy. you do what you normally do but dont overthink. just read if the slope is going to the left or right and how much. then you align properly, you hit the putt, and it either goes in or it doesnt. statistics show that pros dont even make 75 percent of 5 footers. so youre not a bad putter, it just needs to be automatic for you.

 

Actually up to 5' they make 50%, 5' - 10' is 25%.

post #67 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by xerex250 View Post
 

just read if the slope is going to the left or right and how much. then you align properly, you hit the putt, and it either goes in or it doesnt.

If only it were this easy. ;)  I like the attitude though.  If it doesn't go in, who cares?  Just make the next one.

post #68 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

Actually up to 5' they make 50%, 5' - 10' is 25%.

They make 8 footers 50% of the time.
post #69 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post


They make 8 footers 50% of the time.

 

I just did a quick check on PGATour.com they range from 45% - 58% on 1 putts up to 5'.  I was just pointing out that pro's are better putters than Xerex250 was giving them credit for.

post #70 of 77
In my humble opinion and limited experience, getting the speed right is half the battle. If you miss with good speed your are likely left with an easy second putt. If your speed sucks then all bets are off as you may have rocketed past the hole or p#ssy-footed yourself 6 feet short. If I have to choose getting one variable right I will choose speed every time. The right speed with a bad line will generally leave you with an easy second putt unless you are dealing with severe slopes whereas the wrong speed with the right line can end up anywhere.

I'm open to being convinced otherwise but I'm pretty sure that this is the case in the vast majority of scenarios.

EDIT - I'll also add that getting the speed right will teach you a lot about learning green reading and how to see the correct line but if your speed is way off you learn virtually nothing about the correct line.
post #71 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

I just did a quick check on PGATour.com they range from 45% - 58% on 1 putts up to 5'.  I was just pointing out that pro's are better putters than Xerex250 was giving them credit for.

http://thesandtrap.com/t/51757/pga-tour-putts-gained-make-percentage-stats

Those are older. It's now 8 feet.
post #72 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

In my humble opinion and limited experience, getting the speed right is half the battle. If you miss with good speed your are likely left with an easy second putt. If your speed sucks then all bets are off as you may have rocketed past the hole or p#ssy-footed yourself 6 feet short. If I have to choose getting one variable right I will choose speed every time. The right speed with a bad line will generally leave you with an easy second putt unless you are dealing with severe slopes whereas the wrong speed with the right line can end up anywhere.

I'm open to being convinced otherwise but I'm pretty sure that this is the case in the vast majority of scenarios.

EDIT - I'll also add that getting the speed right will teach you a lot about learning green reading and how to see the correct line but if your speed is way off you learn virtually nothing about the correct line.

 

Agree 100%.  There are very few situations where a perfect speed putt will leave you with anything more than a 3-ish foot putt unless you are a horrendous green reader.  They are out there (like putting from one tier to another at an angle to the tier - yikes!) but for the most part, good speed leads to good putting.

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