or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › How long should Wedges last??
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How long should Wedges last??

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 

So tonight i did a impulsive buy lol and bought two new Vokey wedges.....  

 

But when thinking about it,  shouldnt these wedges last me a very long time??    unless someone practices a lot with their wedges??   

 

basically I'm thinking these with getting the grooves re-done every couple of years, I should get atleast 10 years from these?  unless they break lol....

post #2 of 36

I've heard some reports say that wedges last 500 -1,000 shots until the grooves start to wear down.  I think turf conditions are also a factor.  10 years would be a long time to use the same wedges.

post #3 of 36
I highly doubt you will get ten years. Use them till you can tell the difference in the spin. For future reference get wedges that will rust as it will add spin and over time.
post #4 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylemacleod View Post

I highly doubt you will get ten years. Use them till you can tell the difference in the spin. For future reference get wedges that will rust as it will add spin and over time.

 

Wrong.

post #5 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post

I've heard some reports say that wedges last 500 -1,000 shots until the grooves start to wear down.  I think turf conditions are also a factor.

Is this the same with cast wedges as well?
post #6 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post
 

I've heard some reports say that wedges last 500 -1,000 shots until the grooves start to wear down.  I think turf conditions are also a factor.  10 years would be a long time to use the same wedges.

 

* If the turf grass has lots of sand and grit in it, your grooves will wear out faster. Also, you increase the chance of face damage from small pebbles.

* If you have light "sugar" sand in your bunkers, or converted industrial silica, your grooves will last longer.

 

Getting your grooves redone will cost about $70 a club total, especially if your wedges have chromed heads - regrooving requires chrome removal and rechroming.

 

As for cast vs. forged, cast irons have harder metal. But this might get you an extra 10 rounds, not an extra two years.

 

With the 500-1,000 shot rule, I can understand why some TST players have separate practice- and game-day wedges. I'm just not one of them.

post #7 of 36

This was new to me, but a club whether it be a wedge or driver so it should be able to hold more than 1,000 shots :S 

post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher View Post


Is this the same with cast wedges as well?

 

I would assume the testing was done with a cast wedges like Vokey, Cleveland, PING.  It's something I heard from Dave Pelz as he was doing research on this and developing his wedges.  Looking more into it now.  

post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris223 View Post

Wrong.
How
post #10 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylemacleod View Post


How

 

A rusted wedge will not increase spin.  Rust, if anything, decreases spin

 

http://thesandtrap.com/b/bag_drop/equipment_odds_and_ends

http://thesandtrap.com/b/bag_drop/equipment_odds_and_ends#comment-13879

http://thesandtrap.com/b/bag_drop/is_rust_a_must

post #11 of 36
Ok thanks Mike.
post #12 of 36
My bad
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

I can understand why some TST players have separate practice- and game-day wedges. I'm just not one of them.

Curious what your reasons are for not doing so. I ask because I was considering this recently, especially with how inexpensive it is for me to get spare wedges, and I'd like to lean on your club expertise.

I do most of my iron practice with a 6-iron and a PW, and I use all three wedges (P, G, 56) for my short-game practice. It occurs to me that putting together spares of all three would cost me about $100, including shipping (all GolfWorks clubs, which I believe you use also). If I did this, I'd use the newly built ones for gameday and the current ones for my practice bag.

The one thing I worry about if I do this is short-game stuff, if the amount of practice would wear off the bounce on my clubs, causing my short game practice to be with effectively a different set of clubs than I use on gameday, even if the shaft length, grip, and unmodified head (I wouldn't deliberately modify the head), etc were the same.
post #14 of 36

 

I have used my wedges for 5-6 years without having replaced them or sharpened the grooves. On approach shots, the ball usually stops dead close to where it landed, so I don't see a need for more spin and replacing the wedges.

post #15 of 36

From Marty Jertson, Senior Design Engineer at PING:

Quote:

We've studies this a lot .  The actual answer relates how fast the top edge radius changes vs number of hits.  Lots of bunker shots and hitting sandy wet range balls are the worst for wear.  Material hardness is huge. The harder the material , the slower the rate of change. A great reason to use cast 17-4 PING wedges!  They last a long time.  It's not really an answer with one number, say 1000 shots, because its a gradual degradation of edge radius.

 

The biggest performance can be noticed as your club wears on chip shots (where you need the radius) , rough, and wet lies.  On full shots, fwy, no moisture it doesn't matter that much. 

 

Cast vs forged is tricky because you can cast soft alloys, I'd state hardness ~ noting that practically all forgings are soft and the grooves will wear rapidly indeed.

post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
 

 

I have used my wedges for 5-6 years without having replaced them or sharpened the grooves. On approach shots, the ball usually stops dead close to where it landed, so I don't see a need for more spin and replacing the wedges.

 

 

+1. Hooray for some sense. Over the last few years we've had this idea that we have to get new wedges every year or so foisted on us. I wonder who benefits? Oh yes, the OEMs. In most cases, for pretty much all of us, it isn't going to make one iota of difference whether our grooves are a little worn. FWIW, I have an old Ram 'Tom Watson' Tour Grind SW which I still mess around with and it performs pretty much as good as my Vokey even though the Ram's grooves are very worn.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post
 

From Marty Jertson, Senior Design Engineer at PING:

 

...The biggest performance can be noticed as your club wears on chip shots (where you need the radius) , rough, and wet lies.  On full shots, fwy, no moisture it doesn't matter that much...

 

Mike,

This bit at least makes some sense. I don't suppose you can get hold of any spin numbers comparing the same shots with a new vs. a worn wedge from a variety of lies?

post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

I can understand why some TST players have separate practice- and game-day wedges. I'm just not one of them. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shindig View Post

Curious what your reasons are for not doing so. I ask because I was considering this recently, especially with how inexpensive it is for me to get spare wedges, and I'd like to lean on your club expertise.
 

Shindig,

 

I went to the GolfWorks school - a great week - but I don't have the room or equipment to build my own clubs.

 

As per your question, I like my CG14 wedges, but will probably re-fit next season. So, I don't want to duplicate a model I might replace.

 

As for more wear on the practice wedges than the game-day wedges, there would probably be difference you could measure with precision devices. But, I doubt if it would affect play that much. About the only problem might be if a practice wedge got its lie angle jacked, and didn't match the main wedge on set-up.

 

If you have models you like, this might be an option for you. Plus, GolfWorks probably keeps a given head in stock longer than the OEMs do.

 

-------------------

I must say, the Maltby Tour Grind MG wedges with the Diamonized Black finish really look good.

post #18 of 36

Hello, my first post here.

 

Personally, I don't buy into the frequent replacement thing. I just recently changed my sand wedge from an old Ping Eye2 56 degree that I bought used for $20 to a new Cleveland 588 54 degree. The Ping is out of the bag and the loft change took some getting used to, but other than that, both clubs perform exceptionally well for me.  This despite the fact that one is more than 20 years old and the other brand new with the buzz marketed Rotex groove thing.  I'd say if you are happy with the wedges you're playing, no reason not to hang on to them.  I bought the Cleveland because I pretty much bought into the groove hype, but my average score hasn't noticeably wavered at all. I can't justify dropping an additional $250 for a new set of wedges every season with numbers like that. I'd rather spend the dough on green fees, practice balls or lessons.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › How long should Wedges last??