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Why is the Golf Channel advertising illegal products? - Page 2

post #19 of 39

"It's kind of like "Stick-em" that goop NFL wide receivers used in the 70's..which was banned..."

 

I had this mental image of a golf ball sticking to the club, the player looking down the fairway and saying "Wow - I hit that one out of sight!"

 

But I would think that it needs to lessen impact of contact (i.e. slippery) rather than increasing the effect (i.e. sticky).  And if you remember football back in the '70's you'd see guys just covered in that stuff - especially late in the game after it had smeared around a bunch. Always wondered how the players got it all off after the game. I think, besides the rule change, that the advent of thin neoprene gloves was a factor in its discontinuance - get the grip without the mess.

 

If you've been around the game long enough you've seen plenty of illegal products advertised in "reputable" golf sources.  Though many of them would have the decency to print "Not legal for official play" or something like that in 1 point font at the bottom of the page.  :whistle:

post #20 of 39

That is kind of funny though.  I can't watch the Golf Channel anymore other than when a tournament is on that I want to watch.  There are only so many commercials for stuff I will never buy and HD shots of Holly I can take.  

post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by 0ldblu3 View Post
 

News flash: Network stations exist for only one reason, to sell advertising. They don't care about you, they don't care about the community, they don't care about "the game", they care about the bottom line. Don't let them suck you in talking about how smart you are for watching them. They have to tell you that in order for you to keep watching them. All marketers are, at their core, liars. You can live just fine without the product they are selling, seriously, you'll be fine. Tiger can take my set of clubs and shoot par or lower at my club. Hell, anyone on the tour or web.com tour can do it. It's not the clubs, it's the swing. It's not the slime on the face, it's the idiot that might buy it. Hell, these people are the same ones that get fake tans. Put it out there and prove the old adage about fools and money. At least the Golf Channel account executive is making a Mercedes payment or two so that the channel keeps going and can show us "Live from the Presidents Cup" for two days straight when then haven't played any golf yet. Sheesh!

 

As a marketing guy, I'd say your view is a bit simplistic.

 

(But as a marketing guy I don't think lying is at my core. But maybe delusional is at my core too so really I am delusional and don't know what is at my core.)

 

Golf Channel has a vested (goal of the firm is maximize shareholder value) interest in its own brand. And, while I am not their brand advisor, I'd guess their brand relies in large part on being a trusted expect in the world of golf. Running ads for illegal products without disclosing that they are illegal ("Not legal for USGA play"), is an error in brand management. Sure, some late night cable channel running "Brady Bunch" re-runs could care little about who advertises. Not so simple with a specialty channel that relies on being perceived as an expect and trusted source.

post #22 of 39

If nothing else, it is a good reminder to keep your driver face very clean, especially if you are struggling with a slice. I didn't say waxed, though, but after today's range session, I can't say I didn't consider it for a second. Then I figured it would just burn in bad habits I need to eradicate.

post #23 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rustyredcab View Post
 

 

As a marketing guy, I'd say your view is a bit simplistic.

 

(But as a marketing guy I don't think lying is at my core. But maybe delusional is at my core too so really I am delusional and don't know what is at my core.)

 

Golf Channel has a vested (goal of the firm is maximize shareholder value) interest in its own brand. And, while I am not their brand advisor, I'd guess their brand relies in large part on being a trusted expect in the world of golf. Running ads for illegal products without disclosing that they are illegal ("Not legal for USGA play"), is an error in brand management. Sure, some late night cable channel running "Brady Bunch" re-runs could care little about who advertises. Not so simple with a specialty channel that relies on being perceived as an expect and trusted source.

 

Rusty, I'm with you.  I realize there are those who are so cynical that they would disagree.  But brand confidence is what makes money.  Yes, people are "just" protecting their brand because it leads to increased profits in the long run, but WHY they do it isn't as important to me.  The fact that the Golf Channel is neglecting their brand is sad.  I stopped my Golf Digest subscription a long time ago because the number of advertisements (and those stupid ad cards that make flipping pages impossible) began to overtake the number of articles and useful material.  At least when I watch TV I only have to put up with about 20 minutes of commercials every hour.  When half the material is advertising, it's time to rethink my subscription.

I really enjoy a LOT of the programming on the Golf Channel.  But honestly, if this continues and if we start seeing loads of advertising for things that no self-respecting golfer would (or legally could) use, then it's time to switch the channel.  When I watch Morning Drive, I expect real golf stories reported pretty much objectively (I realize nothing is entirely objective).  When I watch the game improvement/instructional shows, I expect tips that I can actually use without breaking USGA rules.  I don't think it's too much to ask that the products they accept advertising dollars from be conforming equipment.

I listen to Dave Ramsey on the radio a lot and if you do too you'll notice that he's pretty picky about who he lets advertise during his show.  Again, it's about protecting his name and the Ramsey brand.  It'd be nice if the Golf Channel gave a crap about theirs.  Otherwise I'd be just as happy if they took the word "Golf" out of their name since apparently it means something different to them than it does to me.  To me, it's not golf if you're not going to follow the Rules of Golf.

post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave67az View Post
 

 

Rusty, I'm with you.  I realize there are those who are so cynical that they would disagree.  But brand confidence is what makes money.  Yes, people are "just" protecting their brand because it leads to increased profits in the long run, but WHY they do it isn't as important to me.  The fact that the Golf Channel is neglecting their brand is sad.  I stopped my Golf Digest subscription a long time ago because the number of advertisements (and those stupid ad cards that make flipping pages impossible) began to overtake the number of articles and useful material.  At least when I watch TV I only have to put up with about 20 minutes of commercials every hour.  When half the material is advertising, it's time to rethink my subscription.

I really enjoy a LOT of the programming on the Golf Channel.  But honestly, if this continues and if we start seeing loads of advertising for things that no self-respecting golfer would (or legally could) use, then it's time to switch the channel.  When I watch Morning Drive, I expect real golf stories reported pretty much objectively (I realize nothing is entirely objective).  When I watch the game improvement/instructional shows, I expect tips that I can actually use without breaking USGA rules.  I don't think it's too much to ask that the products they accept advertising dollars from be conforming equipment.

I listen to Dave Ramsey on the radio a lot and if you do too you'll notice that he's pretty picky about who he lets advertise during his show.  Again, it's about protecting his name and the Ramsey brand.  It'd be nice if the Golf Channel gave a crap about theirs.  Otherwise I'd be just as happy if they took the word "Golf" out of their name since apparently it means something different to them than it does to me.  To me, it's not golf if you're not going to follow the Rules of Golf.

 

Dave, I think what you're failing to consider is that we (those that play by the USGA rules) make up a very small minority of those who actually golf recreationally.  For each one of us that was offended or disgusted that GC would air a commercial for such a product there were likely 50 people that saw the ad and thought they should order it regardless of whether it's a USGA conforming product or not. 

 

Even on this site, which I'd expect attracts the harder core of golfers on the web, we see threads all the time talking about the joys of mulligans, foot wedges and gimme putts.  Some threads even promote such rules violations in the hopes of speeding up the game.

 

We're the minority and not the target market that GC is catering to.

post #25 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

 

Dave, I think what you're failing to consider is that we (those that play by the USGA rules) make up a very small minority of those who actually golf recreationally.  For each one of us that was offended or disgusted that GC would air a commercial for such a product there were likely 50 people that saw the ad and thought they should order it regardless of whether it's a USGA conforming product or not. 

 

Even on this site, which I'd expect attracts the harder core of golfers on the web, we see threads all the time talking about the joys of mulligans, foot wedges and gimme putts.  Some threads even promote such rules violations in the hopes of speeding up the game.

 

We're the minority and not the target market that GC is catering to.

 

Well, you're right about that.  I hadn't considered (and have a little trouble accepting) that we're such a small minority.  If you're right, and we are, then all of those complaints about rules changes (whether it's grooves or anchored strokes) have absolutely no more weight than my complaint about advertising.  If you're right, then the PGA of America's argument that rules changes would somehow affect people's interest in the game is entirely unfounded.  If you're right, then the statements we heard from pros are illogical about how banning an anchored stroke even for recreational golfers would have a significantly negative impact on the future of golf for many people.  If nobody is really following the rules anyway, then changes to the rules don't affect the vast majority of people playing golf, if what you say is true.

 

If the rules only matter to a small minority of golfers, I'd be very surprised.  I know a lot of golfers.  Nearly every one of them tries to educate themselves and follow the rules, as far as I know.  They do when I play with them, at least.  But then again, it's not cheap to play in Phoenix compared to how cheap it was back "home" in the Ozarks.  Maybe the cheaters are also cheapskates.

post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave67az View Post
 

 

Well, you're right about that.  I hadn't considered (and have a little trouble accepting) that we're such a small minority.  If you're right, and we are, then all of those complaints about rules changes (whether it's grooves or anchored strokes) have absolutely no more weight than my complaint about advertising.  If you're right, then the PGA of America's argument that rules changes would somehow affect people's interest in the game is entirely unfounded.  If you're right, then the statements we heard from pros are illogical about how banning an anchored stroke even for recreational golfers would have a significantly negative impact on the future of golf for many people.  If nobody is really following the rules anyway, then changes to the rules don't affect the vast majority of people playing golf, if what you say is true.

 

If the rules only matter to a small minority of golfers, I'd be very surprised.  I know a lot of golfers.  Nearly every one of them tries to educate themselves and follow the rules, as far as I know.  They do when I play with them, at least.  But then again, it's not cheap to play in Phoenix compared to how cheap it was back "home" in the Ozarks.  Maybe the cheaters are also cheapskates.

 

I hope I'm not right but my experiences here and on many courses in the last 3 years would seem to indicate there are a lot of golfers that may say they care about the rules but actually don't.

 

The issue with the anchored putting stroke is it's pretty obvious when someone uses it.  A foot wedge, vaseline on your driver, illegal grooves, even a mulligan isn't as blatantly obvious as someone using a long putter and anchored stroke so I think that's why there was so much more concern about that rule change.

 

Seemed even the consensus here was people wouldn't care if a buddy used an anchored putting stroke as long as they weren't playing for money or in a tournament.

post #27 of 39

I don't see why anyone is surprised.    I mean c'mon people...LOL

post #28 of 39

should i even bring up  the Jack Hamm Info commercial's about his stupid equipment @ 4am ???    but for the GC, its filling airtime and them getting some $$$  

post #29 of 39

if I want to pay for golf club piss-tube infomercials......the golf channel will put it on..

 

That's how it is folks....

 

Wake up.......

post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

 

Dave, I think what you're failing to consider is that we (those that play by the USGA rules) make up a very small minority of those who actually golf recreationally.  For each one of us that was offended or disgusted that GC would air a commercial for such a product there were likely 50 people that saw the ad and thought they should order it regardless of whether it's a USGA conforming product or not. 

 

Even on this site, which I'd expect attracts the harder core of golfers on the web, we see threads all the time talking about the joys of mulligans, foot wedges and gimme putts.  Some threads even promote such rules violations in the hopes of speeding up the game.

 

We're the minority and not the target market that GC is catering to.

 

This is a bit misleading.  The way you say it, it sounds like the majority of golfers are rampant cheaters.  Most of the golfers I've played with over my 40 years in the game may not have been playing strictly by the rules, but the largest percentage of them thought that they were.  They were making procedural mistakes mostly out of ignorance, not an intent to cheat or defraud.  They play by the rules as they know them, and maybe fudge on some things because they don't know any better, or they are trying to keep pace (the classic "drop for a lost ball" syndrome), or mistakenly "protecting" a club from damage without accepting the penalty (too many players on this site do that).  I'm not sure that anyone I have played with more than once or twice would consider using this sort of product, simply because they would see it as straight up cheating, and most of them approach the game with good intent,.  I think that is true of a large percentage of recreational players.  

post #31 of 39
Some may purchase that product and think it's the greatest thing ever, it's simply a slice-cure that improves their game. If it adds to their enjoyment of the game that's ok with me.
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulligan Jeff View Post

Some may purchase that product and think it's the greatest thing ever, it's simply a slice-cure that improves their game. If it adds to their enjoyment of the game that's ok with me.

 

 

I absolutely agree.

 

HOWEVER, they need to understand that it's not allowed under the rules.  My complaint here is that there is no such disclaimer in the commercial.  Truth in advertising is a bit more than just not telling an out and out lie, there's also the lie of omission....

post #33 of 39

This is no different then when they advertised "The Hammer" and other such gimmick clubs via infomercial. Television revenue is driven mostly be advertising and these are golf related products on a golf centric channel. Makes perfect sense to me.

post #34 of 39

i think someone mentioned this...  but do you really think any true golfer, plays all the time, does leagues and tournaments and whatnot...  do you really think they will see these commercials and actually buy them??     

post #35 of 39
By all means the consumer needs to be aware if a particular product is not within the legal limits of the game. On another note, and correct me if I'm wrong, drivers of various manufacturers push the legal limit on COR (tolerance) hence some clubs are over the limit but on the shelves as legal clubs.
post #36 of 39
I haven't seen the ad yet, and though in this case its legality may be apparent to those who know the rules, I'm not sure it is fair for us to expect TGC or other outlets to pass judgement on whether a product conforms to the rules or not when it comes to their ads. Now, I would be real disappointed to find them touting it in some of their game improvement tip segments, but ads are not original content.

And keep in mind, there are a LOT of golfers out there with no handicap, 15 or 16 clubs jammed in the bag, and a real spotty grip on the rules in general. They have a good time out there with their buddies and pay their greens fees. If this stuff helps them a bit the only downside I see is that there may be a few less balls to pick from the laterals along the way.
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