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Are expensive golf balls worth it?

post #1 of 60
Thread Starter 

I am new to the forum and just trying to get opinions on golf balls and whether or not they honestly make a difference in play?  Just some background info, I'm not great and frankly have no idea what my "handicap" is or how to even calculate it!  I play for fun with my brother-in-law and father-in-law; however, that doesn't mean I'm not competitive and want to get better.  This is my first full year of playing golf on a very regular basis, taking lessons, swing anaylsis, etc.

 

My question, is whether or not it's worth it for me to spend the money to play Titleist ProV1X golf balls and if I would even notice the slightest difference in any aspect of my round of golf?  I've been playing with TopFlite D2+ Distance since they are cheap at the sporting goods store I use.  I don't notice anything special about these balls so was contemplating using the more expensive ball but before I spend $50 on 12 balls, is it worth it???  Thanks!!

post #2 of 60

IMO, no, they are not worth it. If you can afford to spend the $, then my all means partake, but I don't believe it will help things very much at this point.

 

Again, IMO, you are better off finding a ball *for less money* that has a good feel for you off the putter and for chipping and pitching. The less money aspect comes into play when you lose one, usually from poor full swing shots. It's easier dealing with a $1.50-2.00 lost ball (usually many lost balls) than several $4 lost balls.

 

Even if you get very good at the game, they still might not be worth it. At that point, you'll have the skills to determine if they are or not (you're still better off starting with the putter and working your way back), and you won't be losing nearly as many.

 

Again, IMO.

post #3 of 60

I don't know ... probably not.  I usually play premium balls but I've played a couple of rounds recently with cheaper balls and seen no ill effects.  Bridgestone e6 ($27/dozen) and Titleist Dt solo ($20/dozen) both seemed to perform fine for me.

 

I have a couple of gift certificates to sporting goods stores and am probably going to use them on these balls ... or others like it.  I've never tried Srixon ... maybe I'll buy a dozen of those too. :)

post #4 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hotrodjrd View Post
 

I am new to the forum and just trying to get opinions on golf balls and whether or not they honestly make a difference in play?  Just some background info, I'm not great and frankly have no idea what my "handicap" is or how to even calculate it!  I play for fun with my brother-in-law and father-in-law; however, that doesn't mean I'm not competitive and want to get better.  This is my first full year of playing golf on a very regular basis, taking lessons, swing anaylsis, etc.

 

My question, is whether or not it's worth it for me to spend the money to play Titleist ProV1X golf balls and if I would even notice the slightest difference in any aspect of my round of golf?  I've been playing with TopFlite D2+ Distance since they are cheap at the sporting goods store I use.  I don't notice anything special about these balls so was contemplating using the more expensive ball but before I spend $50 on 12 balls, is it worth it???  Thanks!!

 

IGiven your playing level, strong "no."  It will be a waste of money to use expensive balls.   In fact, it can even hurt your game if you don't know how to control its spin.  

post #5 of 60

Depends on what "not great" means.  If it means you're typical for a guy who's only been playing for a year and are shooting 90s-100s+, then not at this point for you.  I'm at a point now where the really cheap balls feel like rocks and I don't like playing with them.  But at my mid HC level, the best mid priced balls (like $25-$30/dozen) are still totally acceptable for me, if not quite as nice-feeling as a premium.  For now, I agree with above.  Buy a couple different cheap balls, play the one you like the most around and on the green.  When you start breaking 90 regularly, upgrade to a mid-priced or premium ball.

post #6 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdl View Post
 

For now, I agree with above.  Buy a couple different cheap balls, play the one you like the most around and on the green.  When you start breaking 90 regularly, upgrade to a mid-priced or premium ball.

Or just do what I do as much as possible and tell people to buy you ProV1's (or equivalent) when they ask what you want for your birthday/Anniversary/Christmas/Hanakkah. :-P

 

Between gifts and tee prizes at tournaments I would say that I probably get a heck of lot more balls for free than the ones I actually buy. ;)

post #7 of 60
I suggest you pony up $13 and buy a sleeve and see for yourself. I don't care how bad you are, a urethane covered ball can help your greenside game. And you can find them in the $30 range if you look.

My wife averages about 100. Long and mid iron ball striking are poor. Crushes drives and good with wedges but can't hold a green for squat. I let her chip around with my Pro Vs and Hex Chromes and she was holding greens. Bought her some Srixon SLs to match her swing a little better and her scores have dropped 10 strokes. She loves the short game now and makes lots of up and downs.

Try them for yourself and see. If they don't work you are out a few bucks. If they do work then you might find yourself shaving strokes where it counts. Just my opinion.
post #8 of 60
If you are talking prov1 vs top flight than yes. I practice around greens with a bunch of different balls and my prov1s are much better than my rbz s for instance. I reccomend going on eBay, I get 100 slightly used provs for under 50 bucks and lasts all year
post #9 of 60

i use to be in the same boat..  thinking well i am not great at golf so i just would buy the cheap stuff.... topflight, Wilson..  

 

Well my first kind of step up was getting some Maxfli U/2's and revolutions... 

 

Next step, i bought some U/3's and U4x's, and then some Nxt Tour S balls.....

 

i can honestly say, i didnt think i would be able to game the U4x's or NXT Tour S balls.. but using them has actually been for the better...   

post #10 of 60
I personally wouldn't purchase new balls until I'm shooting consistent 80's. Lostgolfballs.com has some great deals... and EBay is great too...
post #11 of 60

Depends. For you, I'd say probably not but then again...

 

It's all about spin (more or less). If you want good stopping power, it'll tend to mean dearer balls. Doesn't mean you have to follow the crowd and assume that means Pro V1/V1x though. I seriously doubt many of us will get any more performance benefit out of them (or TMAG's Lethal, Bridgestone's B330 series etc) than if we choose TMAG's RBZ Urethane (or, if you can still get them, their TP3s), Cally's Hex Chrome, Bridgestone's E5 or even Topflite's Gamer Tour. All of these have the famed urethane cover and spin like a top if hit well. Outwith the urethane-covered balls, Topflite's Gamer is fantastic value and spins plenty if not quite up there with the urethane crowd.

[There's another ball that's got rave reviews (some of the Admin here were trying them out as well I think) which you can get your side of the pond from a non-typical maker but I can't remember it's name or the manufacturer. Not a lot of help I know.]

The downside? Probably the fact that if you can generate more backspin with a urethane-covered ball, you can pretty much guarantee you can get more side-spin on any hooks or slices you might hit as well meaning you might be further offline than with your existing ball choice(s).

post #12 of 60

Oh. I forgot Wilson's FG Tour balls - if you like a soft feel chipping and putting together with the spin from urethane covers, you might look these up. Great value as well.

post #13 of 60

Here is my opinion as I am the same kind of golfer as you. Not great, but not terrible either.

 

I won't spend $50 on golf balls. Just can't as I lose some on each round. What I do like however, is a ball with lower spin off the tee for straighter drives. I will spend $20 a dozen because I can tell the difference between a Wilson staff fifty over a 8 year old top flite which feels like a hard piece of plastic. I also want to find a good CHEAP ball that I can stick with so I know what to expect when playing. The hard part is finding a good low spin ball that works around the greens. I have been using Bridgestone E6 golf balls. They drive well and I can stay a lot straighter off the tee than I can with a Titleist V1x which has so much more spin for me.

 

again, my goal is to find a decent ball that I can stick with. Right now its the E6, Wilson staff 50's, and pinnicle golds. All of these I like and they are all cheap. Calloway Diablo's are nice too. I am at the point where I am going to pick one of these as my favorite and if anything it will just add confidence to my game.

post #14 of 60

Expensive balls aren't worth it until you can control their flight.

post #15 of 60
playing a Srixon z-star-xv right now actually. Good feel, good distance, good feel around the greens. Not sure how much they cost. Impressed so far with this ball.
post #16 of 60

ON THE OTHER HAND .....

 

I also wonder if in some cases we aren't looking at this all backwards.  If I had a nickel for everytime my dad or father-in-law said "I'm not good enough to play fancy balls" I'd ... well ... have several nickels in a jar somewhere. ;)

 

If I also had a nickel for everytime that either of them hit a chip or a pitch shot that checked up on the green even the slightest, then my nickel jar would be exactly the same size.

 

I wonder if your average high handicapper, who does not hit the ball high and land it soft, would benefit quite a bit MORE from a premium ball that is soft around the greens than your average low handicapper?

 

When I hit a good full wedge into the green, regardless of what type of ball I use, it's going to end up somewhere in the vicinity of the ball mark.  If I use a rock, it will probably take a bounce or two and end up 6-8 feet past it, whereas, if I use a ProV1 it may end up 6-8 feet short of it, but it's always going to be somewhere close-ish.  OTOH, somebody like my dad, who does not hit the ball very high, or with great contact is going to get a lot of forward roll most of the time, and I'm thinking that somebody like him actually would benefit from a premium high spin ball.

 

And people who are only hitting 200 yard drives on good days ... how much will the extra spin really be hurting them in their long game?  I'm thinking not too much.

post #17 of 60

Expensive balls? No. Lots of good ball choices under $20/dz. A few under $15.

 

New balls? Yes. You never really know how old balls will play. I know others here disagree.

 

Same ball? Yes. Plenty of discussion in other threads about this.

 

Which ball? One that feels good to you ON THE GREEN. As a beginner, you have a chance at becoming consistent on the green before you'll be consistent on the tee.

post #18 of 60
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses.  I usually shoot a low to mid 90's...again I'm just starting to get serious about this.  I keep reading reviews of the Titleist ProV1X that says its good for beginners because it has less spin off the tee helping with straighter tee shots and that it'll add distance to the drive.  But I also used this "golf ball fitter" that I found online and plugged in my info and it recommended Nike Mojo Golf Balls.  Anyone ever use these??

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