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Slow / Unskilled Golf - Page 2

post #19 of 46

How about doing "pick it up after 7 or 8 shots" on a few holes to speed up play?  Might not work for your buddy but I think it would be fine for the kids.

post #20 of 46
I actually think a true "beginner's" course is a great idea, 9 holes, short, wide-open but with just enough trouble to keep it interesting without being too frustrating for young golfers or those who are new to the game. Not familiar enough with the industry to say whether or not there's a true market for a course like that and/or if it'd be economically viable, but on the surface it certainly would make a lot of sense.
post #21 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post
 

So I played with an old buddy this weekend - and his son (age 12) and another of his friends.  And it was rough.  If the average for the 3 of them was 150 or better, I'd be floored.  

 

As you can imagine, that many shots X 3 people - combined with not exactly having a keen sense of fast play - we clocked a cool 2.5 hour front nine and didn't remotely finish 18 before dark. We let a few groups play through, but certainly didn't make it easy on the groups behind us.  

 

It got me to thinking - should there be any kind of recommendation to golfers to play par 3's or executives if they aren't of a certain skill level?  Maybe a rating system like ski resorts have - green / blue / black.  Or even like the different tees are rated for HC's at times.  I think the game, the course and this group would have benefited from us playing something a lot more manageable.

 

Certainly.  Nothing at all wrong with that.  In fact they would probably enjoy it more themselves.  That is one of the best things about my home complex.  We had both a 9 hole par 3 course (complete with bunkers and hazards, holes ranging from 80 yards to 195 yards), and a 9 hole executive course, par 31, to take some of that load off the 18 hole, par 72 course.

post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by GangGreen View Post

I actually think a true "beginner's" course is a great idea, 9 holes, short, wide-open but with just enough trouble to keep it interesting without being too frustrating for young golfers or those who are new to the game. Not familiar enough with the industry to say whether or not there's a true market for a course like that and/or if it'd be economically viable, but on the surface it certainly would make a lot of sense.

No reason to build a course that caters to beginners just needs to find a way to get rid of the stigma of playing up. I'd rather play from the reds of a short course than feel like I've been relegated to the kiddies table aka par 3 or rinky-dink exec course. There's a few that are worth playing but most are pretty bad 60's-70's leftover parks and rec tracks. If more courses had men's ratings for the forward tees people would be more receptive to it.

 

We have silver tees at my home course. Similar yardage to the reds but rated for men at 65.7/112 5305 yards. Handicap recommendation on the scorecard is 31+. The whites are 67.7/115 6032 yards handicap range 19-30. If they see a high handicap golfer struggling and holding up play on the 74.7/131 7435 yard tees they will be asked to move back.

post #23 of 46

Lesser skilled or beginning players need not be slow. There are methods of play that they can be encouraged to implement that will both increase their pace of play and their enjoyment (and thus improvement). A few simple solutions...

 

Encourage proper tee selections - beginners and high handicaps should play from the shortest men's tees.

 

Encourage "Ready Golf". Be ready, and hit when safe to do so.

 

All water hazards, lost ball, or OB to be played as laterals. Any doubt, hit a provisional or drop at point crossed.

 

Encourage Stableford scoring, Bogie is last chance to score, if there is a group waiting, pick up a double and move on.

 

A foursome of beginners utilizing these suggestions should easily play an enjoyable and relaxed 18 in less than 4 hrs...

 

unless the posers in front hold them up! :doh:

post #24 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by CR McDivot View Post
 

Lesser skilled or beginning players need not be slow. There are methods of play that they can be encouraged to implement that will both increase their pace of play and their enjoyment (and thus improvement). A few simple solutions...

 

Encourage proper tee selections - beginners and high handicaps should play from the shortest men's tees.

 

Encourage "Ready Golf". Be ready, and hit when safe to do so.

 

All water hazards, lost ball, or OB to be played as laterals. Any doubt, hit a provisional or drop at point crossed.

 

Encourage Stableford scoring, Bogie is last chance to score, if there is a group waiting, pick up a double and move on.

 

A foursome of beginners utilizing these suggestions should easily play an enjoyable and relaxed 18 in less than 4 hrs...

 

unless the posers in front hold them up! :doh:

 

They aren't going to have any fun or learn much picking up after bogey on every hole.  As the OP said, they were shooting about 150, so that means they'd pick up every hole before they got near the green.  When a player is that bad, he has no business on a full size course.  He should be advised of that, and maybe offered a suggestion to see about a group lesson package to at least get some sort of an idea what he's supposed to be doing on the course.  Then a mix of range time and short course play to find a  little bit of game before he tackles the big course again.

 

Another option I've seen used with kids just learning the game is to tee a ball in the fairway no more than 200 yards out, and play in from there.  That way they shorten up full size course to a point that they can handle, and they get to experience all facets of the game.

post #25 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post
 

So I played with an old buddy this weekend - and his son (age 12) and another of his friends.  And it was rough.  If the average for the 3 of them was 150 or better, I'd be floored.

 

As you can imagine, that many shots X 3 people - combined with not exactly having a keen sense of fast play - we clocked a cool 2.5 hour front nine and didn't remotely finish 18 before dark. We let a few groups play through, but certainly didn't make it easy on the groups behind us.

 

It got me to thinking - should there be any kind of recommendation to golfers to play par 3's or executives if they aren't of a certain skill level?  Maybe a rating system like ski resorts have - green / blue / black.  Or even like the different tees are rated for HC's at times.  I think the game, the course and this group would have benefited from us playing something a lot more manageable.

I've run into this a couple times. As a better than average golfer, the friend usually opens the door wide-open for me to comment because they feel self conscious.   they will apologize excessively for hacking/slow play......leaving the door open.

 

I would tactfully say something to the effect......"Hey, lets just have fun........ditch the scorecard and lets knock some balls around....if you get in trouble....drop in the fairway"....or something to that effect.   If they lose 2 balls in the woods....I'd encourage them to drop in the fairway because it's more fun playing from there anyway....LOL

 

They usually understand.........and keep the pace moving along.  I'm not asking them to pick up and wait in the cart while I finish the hole.   I'm asking them to take liberties.....I don't care if they hit a ball in the lake and take a free drop on the green.....so they can putt out...

post #26 of 46

I haven't met a terrible player yet who didn't recognize they were terrible so I'd be surprised if any of them would be offended by the idea of playing a newbie course.  Building creampuff courses with fairways as wide as football fields doesn't really solve the problem though, people just need to take the time to learn the right way to hit a ball.  Cheap driving range/lessons would probably be a better solution.

post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckeyeNut View Post
 

I've run into this a couple times. As a better than average golfer, the friend usually opens the door wide-open for me to comment because they feel self conscious.   they will apologize excessively for hacking/slow play......leaving the door open.

 

I would tactfully say something to the effect......"Hey, lets just have fun........ditch the scorecard and lets knock some balls around....if you get in trouble....drop in the fairway"....or something to that effect.   If they lose 2 balls in the woods....I'd encourage them to drop in the fairway because it's more fun playing from there anyway....LOL

 

They usually understand.........and keep the pace moving along.  I'm not asking them to pick up and wait in the cart while I finish the hole.   I'm asking them to take liberties.....I don't care if they hit a ball in the lake and take a free drop on the green.....so they can putt out...

I would do the same...But I've never had to. That's pretty much standard procedure around here for some reason (thank God). The only people I see actually playing all of the shots out correctly and keeping score when the score is going to be over 100 are tourists. It's pretty much understood that if you can't shoot 100 you are playing practice rounds for fun until you get better.

 

It's more fun to enjoy the occasional good shots or good holes than it is to write down that 120, that beat you down and held up the group, on the scorecard anyway.

 

The only way anybody is going to play a 4 hour round around here is if they get behind a tourist that won't let them through. I would probably not play at all if the rounds took the nightmare length of time I've seen posted from other places.

post #28 of 46
When I was a little kid my dad would take my brother and I onto the course only late in the evening. We would play from the 100 yard markers and call it a par 4.
post #29 of 46

lots of good ideas here for helping children along! I like it!  however I find it funny that there are  ideas aimed towards the Lesser skilled or beginning players but if you mention tee it forward to most players they look at you like you have 3 heads lol. when in reality teeing it forward would help most players enjoy the game more.

post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post
 

So I played with an old buddy this weekend - and his son (age 12) and another of his friends.  And it was rough.  If the average for the 3 of them was 150 or better, I'd be floored.  

 

No problem with me, since your buddy knows how to keep pace, and is introducing new players to this great game.

 

In two or three years, those now 12 year olds will  be teens that are  bombing the ball way past me, and since they will be well grounded in golf etiquette, golf courses will be glad to have them.

 

Me, I'm 65 and often playing with folks where 150 yards is a "good" hit, but the shorter hitters play from the forward tees with a decent shot for a GIR.

post #31 of 46

Picking an appropriate course is part of it. For me, it wasn't that long ago that was piling up 120-130. My first two or three rounds were a par-3 course and I think it was a key factor in my coming back for more. My first big course rounds came on the shorter and wider-open courses in my area. To this day, I stick to white tees.

 

Another good safety tip is not having more than 1 beginner in a group. Ideally, you'd have an experienced golfer showing the new guy the ropes. I was fortunate enough to have that. As brutal as I was early on, my buddy got me on ready golf. Even the worst rounds rarely took much more than four hours.

post #32 of 46
I started out on a local (anything goes more or less) 9-hole course, Candler Park. It was a great way for me to work on my game because the perception is just that of an open to all place to play and practice with no "skill requirement" (at least to me and my friends). I can also say that most of the golfers that I encountered there over my "formative" golf years were lower skilled. Granted I did run into a ringer or two every now and then, but those instances were few and far between.

I knew I was not ready to play in a "real course" but many many driving range sessions and rounds down at Candler helped me get to a level where I am comfortable. This worked for me, and I also read a lot about golf in general, golf etiquette, golf history, and I made it a point to educate myself about respect for the game so this was my way of showing my respect for this wonderful game. Not to mention saving me from embarrassing myself too much. Hey now that I "know how to play" I have little or no excuse-right?
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcanadiens View Post

Picking an appropriate course is part of it. For me, it wasn't that long ago that was piling up 120-130. My first two or three rounds were a par-3 course and I think it was a key factor in my coming back for more. My first big course rounds came on the shorter and wider-open courses in my area. To this day, I stick to white tees.

Another good safety tip is not having more than 1 beginner in a group. Ideally, you'd have an experienced golfer showing the new guy the ropes. I was fortunate enough to have that. As brutal as I was early on, my buddy got me on ready golf. Even the worst rounds rarely took much more than four hours.
Yep! Play the white tees please!! check you machismo at the door fellas unless you really are a single digit handicap. It is very annoying to play behind the "pro-minded" group trying to (unsuccessfully) play the blue tees, watching as they duck hook, shank, slice, and top tee shot after tee shot as they try to "murder the ball into next month" & can we please, please, please get people in the mindset of Ready Golf. My usual group knows this and no feelings are hurt from "taking honors" from someone. I have only been asked one time to speed up play as I was playing with an older group of "old school" acquaintances. I was being respectful of their tradition but once the Marshall asked us to speed up, it was no problem for them and certainly not for me.
post #34 of 46

I paired-up with a couple of really nice guys today.   I could tell they were better golfers than what they showed me today........but they absolutely hacked their way around the course.  They didn't mess around looking for balls or waste time.  There were groups in front of us holding up play.........  We played 18 holes in 4hrs exactly, and it seemed slow not because of my partners.  It felt slow because we played fast enough that we were waiting on the group on front of us on every hole.   Wow....they lost a lot of ball today!!....but it didn't slow them down.

 

They were good company too......I'd be happy to pair-up with them anytime!! We probably would have played in 3hrs flat had it not been for course traffic.  Did they play by the rules and count every shot?  ......no, and I am thankful for it!! LOL

post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintsmania View Post
So I would rather play with a really bad player who plays fast than some single digit handicapper who surveys the green from all angles and does everything but use a vacuum cleaner.

 

I normally play with 12's and 16's and a few singles, and we scream around the course.

 

The slowest rounds I played this year were two in a row with a 1 and 4 - AND the course was WIDE open.  It was ridiculous.  (I even asked at the beginning "Do you have any issues with ready golf?  I'm not a fan of waiting on each other if we are not in the way of each other"  they agreed wholeheartedly and then proceeded to play very formal and watch each other and argue over rules and spend a lot of time on the greens.)  This course was easily a 4 hour run, we took 5 and then a bit - twice.

post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckeyeNut View Post
 

I paired-up with a couple of really nice guys today.   I could tell they were better golfers than what they showed me today........but they absolutely hacked their way around the course.  They didn't mess around looking for balls or waste time.  There were groups in front of us holding up play.........  We played 18 holes in 4hrs exactly, and it seemed slow not because of my partners.  It felt slow because we played fast enough that we were waiting on the group on front of us on every hole.   Wow....they lost a lot of ball today!!....but it didn't slow them down.

 

They were good company too......I'd be happy to pair-up with them anytime!! We probably would have played in 3hrs flat had it not been for course traffic.  Did they play by the rules and count every shot?  ......no, and I am thankful for it!! LOL

 

I think 3 hours, give or take 20 minutes is the pace that every 4-some can play to, regardless of their skill level.   They just need to have common sense about it (don't look for lost ball too long, play ready golf, ...).  If Europeans can play at 3.5 hour pace without carts (so I hear), so can we.  

 

True story.   One of my local course has instruction on their scorecard to limit golf ball search time to 5 mins.   5 mins?   If anyone takes that long to look for a ball on a busy weekend, he will likely get yelled at by the group behind.   Sure enough, a guy on a par 3 hole looks for his ball that apparently went into the water, and there were 2 groups waiting to tee off.  He did so for what seemed like ages for those who are waiting to tee off.  One of us yelled at the guy to get a move on and he snaps back ... "I have 5 minutes to look for my ball, expletive, expletive."   LOL.   Here's a guy that's going to drive 55 MPH in a highway b/c the speed limit posted is 55 MPH.   LOL, II.   The moral of the story ... use common sense to speed up the play.

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