or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Practice Range › Instruction and Playing Tips › Keeping hips at tush line
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Keeping hips at tush line

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'm surprised that I haven't seen more threads about not "humping the goat". I see so many people do it, and I've struggled with it as well. One of my recent lessons had me focusing on pulling the left hip behind me (I'm simplifying, I still try to get my weight forward and have a bit of a hip slide). It's been a great feel for me. It has helped with my blocks to the right and has added distance.

Is this not a common problem for a lot of amateurs?
post #2 of 20
If you're describing a forward push of the hips instead of a lateral slide, then I'd say yes. That simple fix basically cured my slice.

I actually trained myself to start my hip push forward, toward the target, as I complete my backswing... I visualize a coiled spring, where the bottom half starts uncoiling just as the top reaches its maximum tension, which pulls my hands through, instead of where I used to lead with my hands.
post #3 of 20
Plenty of PGA Tour pros early extend slightly. It can add power to a swing. In some cases we encourage our students to early extend, particularly when the ball is on a tee. It's not always a bad, bad thing.
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Plenty of PGA Tour pros early extend slightly. It can add power to a swing. In some cases we encourage our students to early extend, particularly when the ball is on a tee. It's not always a bad, bad thing.

You are the pro, so I believe what you say. BUT, I'm not sure the average amateur can hump the goat and gain better results. The spine angle changes and the hands will generally go out. Also, they usually don't open the hips at impact as they should. These folks tend to have the shanks on any partial shots they attempt.

You say it can be helpful when the ball is on a tee. Do you promote a different hip turn/spine angle on tee shots vs fairway shots?
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by boil3rmak3r View Post

You are the pro, so I believe what you say. BUT, I'm not sure the average amateur can hump the goat and gain better results.

It depends on the amateur. We have put many into a pattern with the driver that encourages early extension because they can game 10 mph of clubhead speed with no or little loss of control.

Beyond that, "early extension" is often better described as "lack of regaining flexion."
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

It depends on the amateur. We have put many into a pattern with the driver that encourages early extension because they can game 10 mph of clubhead speed with no or little loss of control.

Beyond that, "early extension" is often better described as "lack of regaining flexion."

Do you recommend this to some on fairway or pitch shots? I'm curious, because I've always heard that your swing shouldn't differ with a teed up drive or a pitching wedge from the fairway.
post #7 of 20
The driver and pitch swings are very different. As are driver and iron swings.

To be clear, we don't recommend early extending to even the majority of players. But it's not always a bad thing.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

The driver and pitch swings are very different. As are driver and iron swings.

To be clear, we don't recommend early extending to even the majority of players. But it's not always a bad thing.

When is it a good thing? I'm curious.

I know I can get away with early extension with a any shot, if I compensate, but why do it in the first place? Especially of it only works on balls that are teed up?
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Plenty of PGA Tour pros early extend slightly. It can add power to a swing. In some cases we encourage our students to early extend, particularly when the ball is on a tee. It's not always a bad, bad thing.

 

Yeah I would say it rare to see a player stay completely "on the wall" from A4-7.  Even Mac doesn't do it ;-)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boil3rmak3r View Post


When is it a good thing? I'm curious.

I know I can get away with early extension with a any shot, if I compensate, but why do it in the first place? Especially of it only works on balls that are teed up?

 

Actually made a post on this on my swing thread, check it out http://thesandtrap.com/t/40164/my-swing-mvmac/198#post_910514

 

There are a few reasons why you might EE, rate the arms lower, trying to swing out to the right, head going "through the wall" on the back swing.  There's a few more, don't want to overcomplicate things.

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Plenty of PGA Tour pros early extend slightly. It can add power to a swing. In some cases we encourage our students to early extend, particularly when the ball is on a tee. It's not always a bad, bad thing.

Thank you..some things that people,say are bad..aren't bad for all. Great post iacas. One session I won't hump the goat as bad..others more

Here is a question for u guys. What about the flat soled linkster golf shoe? I heard from the online communities that this helps with the goat humping...vs guys that wear a gym shoe to,play golf. Is this a myth?

Anyways..great thread
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by c peterich View Post


Here is a question for u guys. What about the flat soled linkster golf shoe? I heard from the online communities that this helps with the goat humping...vs guys that wear a gym shoe to,play golf. Is this a myth?

Anyways..great thread

 

Not sure if they help all that much with EE but they are great shoes.  More info here http://thesandtrap.com/t/55204/true-shoes-barefoot-and-more

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

The driver and pitch swings are very different. As are driver and iron swings.

To be clear, we don't recommend early extending to even the majority of players. But it's not always a bad thing.

 

Do you mind elaborating on this?  If its off topic you could send a PM please.  Specifically, the driver and iron swings differing (other than hitting down for irons and up for driver)

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bananarama View Post
 

Do you mind elaborating on this?  If its off topic you could send a PM please.  Specifically, the driver and iron swings differing (other than hitting down for irons and up for driver)

 

That alone does most of it. You don't have to get your weight forward in the same way with a driver. Early extending prevents your weight from getting forward in the same way you would with an iron swing.

 

We have a few threads on "driver versus iron swing."

 

In fact, we have so many, I'm going to merge them all. So for a short while some links may be broken. I'll edit this post with the final URL when I'm done merging.

 

http://thesandtrap.com/t/3494/

post #14 of 20
Could someone explain early extension and "the wall"? I've never heard these terms.b3_huh.gif
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinseeker81 View Post

Could someone explain early extension and "the wall"? I've never heard these terms.b3_huh.gif

"The wall" is simply an imaginary vertical line along your butt as viewed from a down-the-line camera angle.  (As if you backed up to a wall while in your setup - in fact there are good drills where you literally do this)  If you hips go towards the ball at any point during the swing, they are said to be "coming off the wall."

 

Early Extension (EE) is, as far as I know, simply having fully extended arms PRIOR to impact.  I think it's pretty common among as hacks ;) ... I know I do it.

post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

"The wall" is simply an imaginary vertical line along your butt as viewed from a down-the-line camera angle.  (As if you backed up to a wall while in your setup - in fact there are good drills where you literally do this)  If you hips go towards the ball at any point during the swing, they are said to be "coming off the wall."

 

Early Extension (EE) is, as far as I know, simply having fully extended arms PRIOR to impact.  I think it's pretty common among as hacks ;) ... I know I do it.

I thought EE was "standing up" or losing the flexion in your knees and spine prior to impact?

post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinseeker81 View Post

Could someone explain early extension and "the wall"? I've never heard these terms.b3_huh.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

"The wall" is simply an imaginary vertical line along your butt as viewed from a down-the-line camera angle.  (As if you backed up to a wall while in your setup - in fact there are good drills where you literally do this)  If you hips go towards the ball at any point during the swing, they are said to be "coming off the wall."

 

Early Extension (EE) is, as far as I know, simply having fully extended arms PRIOR to impact.  I think it's pretty common among as hacks ;) ... I know I do it.

 

Correct about the wall, not so much with the EE ;-)

 

Like Erik mentioned earlier, you could really call EE not gaining flexion.  When we talk about flexion, we're talking about from the hips and not the knees.  Yes it's when tailbone tucks under, head moves off the wall.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

I thought EE was "standing up" or losing the flexion in your knees and spine prior to impact?

 

Actually when golfers stand up, you'll tend to see the knees flex too much, "saggy" look.  Knees flex to get the club down to the ball.

post #18 of 20
Some recent changes to my transition have me humping the goat pretty hard, poor little goat. My ass comes way off the wall but my head stays pretty stable. I'm going to start doing some of Dave's "Toes up" drills to see if that will help keep everything moving more laterally.

Question: if the head stays relatively stable can EE be lived with? I have to work hard at coming from the inside and the goat humping seems to magnify when flattening out in transition. My feeling is that it can be ironed out later on as long as my head stays centered and I'm not coming OTT.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Instruction and Playing Tips
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Practice Range › Instruction and Playing Tips › Keeping hips at tush line