or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Practice Range › Instruction and Playing Tips › The Average Golf Handicap Hasn't Improved for the Last 30 Years (Anyone have data on this)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Average Golf Handicap Hasn't Improved for the Last 30 Years (Anyone have data on this) - Page 2

post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by c peterich View Post

It is the economy...and both adults in a family working now that is causing handicaps not to drop. People just don't have the time anymore to work on their games like we used to. Also golf prices are rising..substantially in my area...lessons/ equipment/ and round and membership prices. All this leads to less playing and practicing..which is why no one is really improving. The game of golf Is becoming its own worst enemy. ...it is truly alienating the middle and lower classes...very very very sad.

 

Golf is a predominately male sport, men have traditionally been the bread winners and have worked 40-60 hours for the last 10+ years.  The role of the male in the family unit has changed over the years, but not only because a higher number of their spouses work but because we're more involved with our children.

 

When I was a kid, the males role was to work while the female took care of the house and kids.  When men weren't working they had little household responsibility except to mow the lawn, take out the garbage, etc,  so they had plenty of time for golf, fishing, bowling or any other hobby. 

 

The economy is impacting the cost of everything, percentage wise I doubt the cost of golf has increased at a higher percentage than any other recreational activity.  Range balls at my local range have gone up a $1 in 4 years, they used to be $12 for a large (120 ball bucket) in 2009 and now they are $13, hardly a reason to quit the sport or not practice.

 

Equipment, lessons and green fees need to be shopped for, you can buy the latest and greatest driver for $500 or buy last years latest and greatest for $100.  You can often find discounted lessons if you shop them, buy them in bulk or you can just get a lot of great free advice here.  Sites like Golfnow have reduced the cost of green fees and if money is a big concern you can always look at off peak times to get a fair price.

 

Overall I think the lack of improvement in handicap is more related to the inverted bell curve that handicaps follow for the average person and population trends.

post #20 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

 

Golf is a predominately male sport, men have traditionally been the bread winners and have worked 40-60 hours for the last 10+ years.  The role of the male in the family unit has changed over the years, but not only because a higher number of their spouses work but because we're more involved with our children.

 

When I was a kid, the males role was to work while the female took care of the house and kids.  When men weren't working they had little household responsibility except to mow the lawn, take out the garbage, etc,  so they had plenty of time for golf, fishing, bowling or any other hobby. 

 

The economy is impacting the cost of everything, percentage wise I doubt the cost of golf has increased at a higher percentage than any other recreational activity.  Range balls at my local range have gone up a $1 in 4 years, they used to be $12 for a large (120 ball bucket) in 2009 and now they are $13, hardly a reason to quit the sport or not practice.

 

Equipment, lessons and green fees need to be shopped for, you can buy the latest and greatest driver for $500 or buy last years latest and greatest for $100.  You can often find discounted lessons if you shop them, buy them in bulk or you can just get a lot of great free advice here.  Sites like Golfnow have reduced the cost of green fees and if money is a big concern you can always look at off peak times to get a fair price.

 

Overall I think the lack of improvement in handicap is more related to the inverted bell curve that handicaps follow for the average person and population trends.

I can say on a personal note that your point about economic and male/female roles changing is true. Right now, my wife works 4 days a week and I'm full time. We have a 15 month old. When I'm not at work or on weekends, the majority of my time is devoted to helping with my daughter and being with family. It is very hard to find 4 hours on the course. The way I'm getting my golf fix in is by setting up a practice station in my basement with a net. After my daughter goes to sleep, I can practice about an hour each night. It's cheaper then going to the driving range and, as a beginner, its forced me to focus on solid ball contact and not worry about how I look or where the ball is going--I'll get that later. My point is that because I'm not on the golf course, it's very hard for me to lower my HC. My long term goal is to become a solid ball stricker now and then I'll work on stuff like the short game and actually playing the game when I have more time.  

post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by scopek View Post
 

The way I'm getting my golf fix in is by setting up a practice station in my basement with a net. After my daughter goes to sleep, I can practice about an hour each night...

 

I have a net and mat setup in the back yard, and it is a way for me to practice chipping strokes without feeling (or rather being made to feel) I am not getting my moneys worth out of range balls when I go there. Everyone looks at me funny when I chip half my bucket.

 

The major "plus" you mentioned is that it is really convenient to get out any time you have some free time and hit.

post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by scopek View Post
 

Interesting historical perspective. So, what is "the true aspect of the "Great Gentleman's Game"? Or is it one those, "If you have to ask, you'll never understand" things? How does one become a student of the game? 

 

It doesn't seem surprising that the average HC hasn't changed much over the years given that only 15% of golfers have ever taken a lesson. And, according the the Golf Evolution website, only a small portion of those golfers actually improve. I've heard a lot about how modern swing methods and equipment haven't helped and we should go back to the "old school" methods, but another way of looking at it is that modern golfers aren't utilizing modern technology to their full advantage (i.e. being able to record their swing). 

 

These are two very good topics to discuss throughout this forum, which need to have their own threads.

 

I will start a new thread for each topic and let's see how others state there opinions.

 

I will start the threads in Golf Talk / The Clubhouse Forum

 

Club Rat

post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by joekelly View Post
 

You may be quite mistaken. 30 years ago golf was much cheaper, life was easy going and  folks enjoyed their time out on the links. So even the worst golfers had fun. Now the game is costly, more competitive and much easier to lose face (look foolish) if playing poorly. 

 

????

 

Golf in Northern California Bay Area (where living cost is one of the highest in US) can still be played pretty cheap.  It looks like every city seems to have cheap municipal golf courses.  E.g, I can play for $12 walking rate (late afternoon start) and can still finish good number of holes.  If you scour through Golf now.com for discount tee times, you'd be surprise how affordable golf can be even in Bay Area.   And I see all kinds of people playing regardless of income level.  In fact, I wish golf was a bit more expensive and exclusive around here so that I can get better tee times and play in less crowded "cheap" courses.   And most weekend players I've played with ... many of them are just having fun or not competitive at all or both.    I.e, they play poorly :-D, no pun intended.

post #24 of 51
I also think there is more obsessing about having the perfect swing now. Score isn't the end all anymore, do to Internet forum golf. This forum has some valuable info,,but I'm sure there is numerous posters that only care about the looks of the swing vs..score. We are all guilty of this,,and negate to work on the main area in golf..the short game,,,or working on getting the ball in the fairway..vs hitting 300 plus yards all the time.

A million reasons.,
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by c peterich View Post

I also think there is more obsessing about having the perfect swing now. Score isn't the end all anymore, do to Internet forum golf. This forum has some valuable info,,but I'm sure there is numerous posters that only care about the looks of the swing vs..score. We are all guilty of this,,and negate to work on the main area in golf..the short game,,,or working on getting the ball in the fairway..vs hitting 300 plus yards all the time.

A million reasons.,

 

To me, obsessing about either one (perfect swing or score) isn't healthy for playing this game, G-A-M-E.   I also fell into this trap and am obsessed about score (and resulting handicap index) once too often.  I don't give a !#!$# my swing form as long as it is accurate.  Anyway, finding a balance to enjoy playing golf vs obsessing about score is a key to golf nirvana, IMO.  

post #26 of 51
Out of curiosity, do we have an approximation in terms of handicap for golfers? I read that 80% of the golfing community are above an 18 handicap?!

Can anyone suggest any numbers here.
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by looseleftie View Post

Out of curiosity, do we have an approximation in terms of handicap for golfers? I read that 80% of the golfing community are above an 18 handicap?!

Can anyone suggest any numbers here.

 

I read the same thing. So, we can only have a handicap up to 36.4, so by definition the average handicap is going to be 18.2. Maybe with improved equipment, the average handicap is now only 13?

 

http://www.usga.org/handicapping/articles_resources/Men-s--Handicap-Indexes/

 

I also read somewhere that only 10% of the people playing have a handicap.

 

http://thesandtrap.com/t/6720/handicap-percentiles

 

Most people with a handicap can get down to 18 with a lot of experience and strategy even with an inconsistent swing. I would suppose that at least half the people can get down to 13 because they do have more consistent swing, while only 30% are single digit players.

 

I guess if what I read is true about the 10% of golfers have a handicap, then this puts the 18 handicap at 8% of all golfers. Which more or less makes sense.

post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

I read the same thing. So, we can only have a handicap up to 36.4, so by definition the average handicap is going to be 18.2. Maybe with improved equipment, the average handicap is now only 13?

 

Sorry, Lihu, but that doesn't make any sense at all. Your seventh grade math teacher called and is thinking of revising your grade… :-)

 

http://www.usga.org/handicapping/articles_resources/Men-s--Handicap-Indexes/

 

post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Sorry, Lihu, but that doesn't make any sense at all. Your seventh grade math teacher called and is thinking of revising your grade… :-)

 

http://www.usga.org/handicapping/articles_resources/Men-s--Handicap-Indexes/

 

Ms. Reilly already called about my grade me as soon as I posted :-P

 

So, I was only thinking that the 36.4 is the average so half of that is 18.2, but I noticed that the number for the 50% mark of all male handicappers was only 13 handicap.

 

I interpreted that as 50% of all male golfers is a 13HC ?

 

Also, I was wondering about the 10% (of all golfers having a handicap) number, it seemed like it was right.

post #30 of 51

I think this site has contributed to lowering handicaps :beer:

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post
 

I think this site has contributed to lowering handicaps :beer:

Yes and no. The rules forum caused a bit of a spike in my HC ;-).

post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post
 

I think this site has contributed to lowering handicaps :beer:


Yes, it has in my case :dance:

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

Yes and no. The rules forum caused a bit of a spike in my HC ;-).

Ha ha, so true.

post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

So, I was only thinking that the 36.4 is the average so half of that is 18.2, but I noticed that the number for the 50% mark of all male handicappers was only 13 handicap.

 

I interpreted that as 50% of all male golfers is a 13HC ?

 

50% (roughly, since the "13"s spans from 48 to 53%) of male golfers with a handicap are a ~13 or better.

post #35 of 51
So if I'm reading the statistics correctly (and assuming I was awake that day in class), the median handicap is around 13 (half above, half below) for those who maintain one. Interesting, wonder what it be if you were able to factor in those who do not maintain an active handicap. Intuitively (sp?) you would think the number would be higher since one would think those who maintain a handicap are more serious but, on the flip side, I'm sure there are just as many really good golfers who (for whatever reason) do not maintain an "official" handicap.

My first ever official handicap should post with the next revision but if I understand the formulas correctly I should be at 24.9 meaning (based on the chart) that 92% of the golfers out there maintain a lower handicap (how depressed am I right now...haha). Granted, I play mostly at public courses where its mostly weekend golfers but I can pretty safely say that there's no way 92% of the golfers I get randomly paired up with are shooting those kind of scores.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

Yes and no. The rules forum caused a bit of a spike in my HC " src="http://files.thesandtrap.com//images/smilies/new/a2_wink.gif">.

 



FOR SURE...ignorance WAS bliss before I found this sight.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Instruction and Playing Tips
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Practice Range › Instruction and Playing Tips › The Average Golf Handicap Hasn't Improved for the Last 30 Years (Anyone have data on this)