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New irons for a teen - Page 2

post #19 of 47
Oh no, not the dreaded MPF.

I fear a 700 post thread coming on
post #20 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Oh no, not the dreaded MPF.

I fear a 700 post thread coming on

 

HAHA

 

Cavity backs will give you more weighting to the edge of the clubhead creating more forgiveness by increasing MOI. There are a ton of clubs that combine technologies. The trend now is Cavity back style for long irons, and Muscleback style for shorter irons. 

 

Go demo some clubs and see what works for you. 

 

I recommend Mizuno myself. Mostly because they have a great selection of shafts with out upcharging, and their process looks more refined and detailed compared to other companies. 

post #21 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Oh no, not the dreaded MPF.

I fear a 700 post thread coming on

Nothing wrong with MPF if you know how to interpret it and don't follow numbers blindly.  Obviously everyone has a different swing and the best indication on how one hits certain clubs is to test them, but MPF gives you a basic guideline on what might be a good place to start.

post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

Nothing wrong with MPF if you know how to interpret it and don't follow numbers blindly.  Obviously everyone has a different swing and the best indication on how one hits certain clubs is to test them, but MPF gives you a basic guideline on what might be a good place to start.

I can go with that as a start, but I believe the MPF does not take into account the sole grind of the iron and to me that plays a lot into the 'playability' of an iron
post #23 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post


I can go with that as a start, but I believe the MPF does not take into account the sole grind of the iron and to me that plays a lot into the 'playability' of an iron

I agree, but sole grind goes into whether a player is a sweeper or a digger, not if they are best suited for a particular category of iron (SGI, GI, or blade).  Most won't be able to determine if the sole grind is appropriate testing off a mat either, you need to be on the course.

post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

I agree, but sole grind goes into whether a player is a sweeper or a digger, not if they are best suited for a particular category of iron (SGI, GI, or blade).  Most won't be able to determine if the sole grind is appropriate testing off a mat either, you need to be on the course.

 

Well most amateurs are not a sweeper of the ball. A good swing will be much more shallow than a typical amateur swing. So I don't see sole grinds as that important for regular irons, maybe something to keep mindful of. 

post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

Well most amateurs are not a sweeper of the ball. A good swing will be much more shallow than a typical amateur swing. So I don't see sole grinds as that important for regular irons, maybe something to keep mindful of. 
Au contraire, mon ami.

I found sole grind, which includes bounce, to be of great importance in the playability of an iron. For example, Iook no further than what Callaway has done with the 2013 X forged with the higher bounce- the turf interaction is phenomenal. I've seen too many threads complaining about digging irons -sole grind and bounce have much to do with the playability of an iron.

That's of course if you get the right category of iron for your game
post #26 of 47

That's the thing right? It isn't the iron it's the swing. Your substituting technology to cover a fault in the golf swing, too steep of an angle of attack. If the swing is better, then high bounce isn't required. It might still be slightly beneficial, or personal preference. 

post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

That's the thing right? It isn't the iron it's the swing. Your substituting technology to cover a fault in the golf swing, too steep of an angle of attack. If the swing is better, then high bounce isn't required. It might still be slightly beneficial, or personal preference. 

Not always - to me, if you have too steep of an AOA, you're going to have deep and/or slanting divots.

 

At the same time, what is high bounce? I guess it's relative.

 

I mean, why would Roger Cleveland design a player's club like X Forged 2013 with more bounce unless he'd found something good happens with this grind?

 

My divots are like dollar bills and shallow - I'm no expert, but I've found some irons glide better than others. Other irons have a sharp leading edge, and woe unto many when that leading edge digs and stops your swing.  I guess you can say it's all a balance.

 

But I think the guys got it right above -- if you're using the MPF, use it as a general guide only, and then demo clubs and see how they work for you.

 

My problem with the MPF is that Maltby sets the parameters of the factor - he also designs clubs that probably score fairly high - IOW, it's not exactly impartial - it's how Maltby thinks an iron should work.

 

The way I purchase a club is to look at my swing, and then decide I need a CB that is forgiving but still looks good to my eye -- then I start demoing. It seems to work without the MPF.

post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamGray View Post

Hello people of the sand trap! I am looking to get a new set of irons over the "off season" (I play all year so I don't really have an off season 😄") and was wondering if you had any suggestions?

Let me give you a little background. I am 16 years old and a 6.3 index. I strike my irons near the sweet spot most of the time but do want a little bit of forgiveness. I swing my driver around 103 and get it out there around 270ish. I am looking for more of a players iron but definitely need something with a bit of forgiveness. Since there has not been much change in players irons over the years I don't need to get the most recent ones as long as they are recent enough that I should be able to get my hands on them and test them!

Thanks for any advice and shaft flex would be another question I have but I am more interested in the first question 😄. Thanks in advance and I hope you guys have a wonderful day.

 

How much $$$ are you prepared to spend on a fitted set of irons?

post #29 of 47
Thread Starter 
I am prepared to drop up to 1150-1200. They are really an investment and want them to last at least 5 years
post #30 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teed off View Post

How much $$$ are you prepared to spend on a fitted set of irons?
For the right irons I may drop up to 1400 but only if they are absolutely amazing
post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamGray View Post


For the right irons I may drop up to 1400 but only if they are absolutely amazing

Remember the saying "It's the Indian, not the arrow"...  Consider that the average handicap has changed for the better by approx 2 strokes in the past 15 or more years.  Most of the changes in irons each year is in the aesthetics and not the performance.  Almost all companies claim their new set of irons are longer than the previous model, and they usually are... cause they crank the loft and lengthen the shaft.  

 

Having said that, I'm all for having a new set of irons, but don't expect your game to skyrocket due to the new sticks.   Grab a set of quality irons that appeal to you visually, feel good in hand and call it a day.   

post #32 of 47
Thread Starter 
That was my feeling. When you get to a certain point no club can help you that much. I'm just tired of hot spots on my irons and want a change in look
post #33 of 47

Yea the best thing to do is, do some research, get a short list of irons you want. Then go hit them. See which ones look good. With what your price range is, you can pretty much get any irons besides AP2's and get custom golf shafts in them as well. 

post #34 of 47
Thread Starter 
Yeah from what I have gathered I do have a short list. My list includes Mizuno Mp54 titleist CB callaway apex pro/x forged and ping s55
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamGray View Post

Yeah from what I have gathered I do have a short list. My list includes Mizuno Mp54 titleist CB callaway apex pro/x forged and ping s55

Any of the sticks you have mentioned will get the job done....  Go hit them all, and then make a final decision. After testing all the above irons, go with the ones that are most aesthetically pleasing to YOUR eyes as they will all perform well in the hands of a person with a 6.3 index. If you can not get past the looks of a particular club you will never hit it well no matter how good others claim it to be. 

 

I also find that as human beings, we get lazy.  I think we sometimes feel that these hi tech clubs help us so much that we don't try as hard to make a good swing. We think that the club is going to do the work for us therefore we become lazy and do not give it our best each and every time. I found this to be the case when I hung up my Mizuno MS-7's after playing them for 10 years, and picking up a set of Mizuno MX-200's in 2009.   I love my 200's but I still have to do my part. Sorry for the rambling on...  

post #36 of 47

I currently game the Adams CB3 4-GW .....Love em. They hit pure and the workability hasnt been an issue given the width of the soles. The top line is a little thicker than most irons in its class but I hover around a 6 hdcp and have shot several rounds under par. Definitely demo before buying though. Wilsons c series should also be considered if you dont want to break the bank.

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