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If you could change ONE rule, what would it be? - Page 8

post #127 of 398

i wish i could repair the spike marks left by the moros who drag their feet

post #128 of 398

My only objection to out of bounds is when it involves houses within a stone's throw of the fairway.  I *know* the OB was there when I tee'd off, but this is really an issue with course layout and trying to respect private property.  My issue is that you may not even realize it when you tee off and it appears you should be fine from the tee, but you walk 250 yards to find out you are OB.  From a pure pace of play point of view, it's a real hassle to walk all the way back to the tee to hit again. Yes, you should have hit a provisional, but realistically that happens infrequently.

 

So my solution is this:

 

Change the rules to create a new category "OB w/Drop" indicated by a different color stake (Orange maybe?).  When used, this version of OB would allow you to drop 2 club lengths from where the ball crossed the line like a lateral hazard, but unlike a hazard you do not have the option to play the ball as it lies or drop on the opposite side.

 

I consider this a minor change that would give golf courses the option to determine how OB should be handled in specific circumstances.

post #129 of 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelCochran View Post

My only objection to out of bounds is when it involves houses within a stone's throw of the fairway.  I *know* the OB was there when I tee'd off, but this is really an issue with course layout and trying to respect private property.  My issue is that you may not even realize it when you tee off and it appears you should be fine from the tee, but you walk 250 yards to find out you are OB.  From a pure pace of play point of view, it's a real hassle to walk all the way back to the tee to hit again. Yes, you should have hit a provisional, but realistically that happens infrequently.

 

So my solution is this:

 

Change the rules to create a new category "OB w/Drop" indicated by a different color stake (Orange maybe?).  When used, this version of OB would allow you to drop 2 club lengths from where the ball crossed the line like a lateral hazard, but unlike a hazard you do not have the option to play the ball as it lies or drop on the opposite side.

 

I consider this a minor change that would give golf courses the option to determine how OB should be handled in specific circumstances.


I have to strongly disagree with this.

 

A strong penalty is needed for out of bounds or too many would swing for the fences and not worry about hitting the fairway since the penalty is minimal. A 250 yard driver will try for 300 and stay in bounds about 10 percent of the time. You having to walk back to the tee box every so often will cost less time than the searching that will go on with people searching for OB balls.

 

post #130 of 398

I totally agree, and I'm not suggesting we replace all OB, just give courses an "in between" option for certain circumstances.  The vast majority of OB situations would not change.

post #131 of 398

McIlroy's frustration was exacerbated by a sequence on the par-5 seventh, when he was lining up a birdie putt, and a gust of wind caused his ball to move. A penalty stroke led to a bogey

Read More http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-tours-news/blogs/local-knowledge/2011/07/mcilroy-its-not-my-sort-of-golf.html#ixzz1SSY0HBBc

 

Rory complains abit, i like he's honest that he doesn't like the british open, to each his own. Btu i do agree that if your lining up for a putt, and the wind blows the ball, you shouldn't be penalized. Why should you be punished because a gust of wind moves your ball. Thats insane, i say if it happens you notify the rules guy and then get to replace the ball on its original spot.

 

Now i do agree, if your on a green, and the ball just moves off a ledge because of the wind you play were it ends up. But when you line up for a putt, you shouldn't be penalized because it moved a degree.

post #132 of 398

I wasn't a fan of the drop zone rules by the "grandstands" either.  Fowler was able to blast a drive way over to the "grandstands" and his drop was 20 yards further than his drive.

 

At least with these two issues, they didn't factor in a win/lose for either golfer.

 

post #133 of 398
Which is why, the crafty veterans leave their mark behind the ball for as long as possible in windy conditions. Or will not place their ball back until the last possible moment.
post #134 of 398
Agree this is a dumb rule. If a bird flies down and takes your ball you get to replace it, but if the wind moves it a dimple it is a stroke. Just doesn't make sense. Is there an explanation as to why this is even a rule. Is it the 'addressing of the ball' that does it? So because you are about to hit the ball and something moves it, it is deemed that you moved it? That doesn't make any sense either. I just can't figure what advantage they are trying to eliminate with this rule. If the wind moves it, especially after it had been marked and replaced, then you should just have to replace it to the original position.

I don't think being a crafty veteran has anything to do with it. The rule only comes into play when you are addressing the ball. So when you may have picked up your mark won't matter. Now, I have seen some guys in the windy situation simply not ground the club behind the ball. They will just hover the club above or behind the ball then hit it without grounding the club.
post #135 of 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by goblue107501 View Post

Is there an explanation as to why this is even a rule. Is it the 'addressing of the ball' that does it? So because you are about to hit the ball and something moves it, it is deemed that you moved it? That doesn't make any sense either. I just can't figure what advantage they are trying to eliminate with this rule. If the wind moves it, especially after it had been marked and replaced, then you should just have to replace it to the original position.

 

The problem is, how can you ever prove whether it was moved by the wind, or by you taking your address? You can't - it's a judgement call. Players would be arguing over it with the rules officials. The rules of golf as currently written are cleverly done so to prevent as much as possible the necessity of a judgement call.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by goblue107501 View Post

Now, I have seen some guys in the windy situation simply not ground the club behind the ball. They will just hover the club above or behind the ball then hit it without grounding the club.


Right, because that's a good way to avoid being penalized by a gust of wind.

 

post #136 of 398

I would change the playing out of turn rule as if you are ready to "hit" and it does not interfere with anyone else then you should be able to, as a lot of time is wasted waiting for players to hit on every hole.

post #137 of 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by handicap14 View Post

I would change the playing out of turn rule as if you are ready to "hit" and it does not interfere with anyone else then you should be able to, as a lot of time is wasted waiting for players to hit on every hole.

I would imagine that this *rule* is not followed by most since there is no penalty for playing out of turn in stroke play. Still working on one of my guys to not be so *polite* - I guess those damn Midwesterners just can't help it.
post #138 of 398

Ya, we call it ready play.. oh wait.. everyone does that already don't they?

 

I hate when someone doesn't even go to their ball except after everyone who he perceives to be before them hits.

post #139 of 398
I wouldn't change any rule that would differentiate the game that amateurs play from that which the pros play.

I don't know of any course that doesn't aggressively encourage ready golf for non-tournament, casual rounds. Rightfully so, but it's worth noting that, especially in match play, it's important to have a clearly established manner of determining order of play.
post #140 of 398

Ready golf is fine if done correctly.  However, I've played with guys that think it is always their turn first, even if I am ready and away.

post #141 of 398

I'd probably change S&D for OOB / lost ball to something more like hitting into hazards.  Mainly in an attempt to rule out any going back to re-tee.

 

And I'd give a free drop out of divots.

post #142 of 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post

I'd probably change S&D for OOB / lost ball to something more like hitting into hazards.  Mainly in an attempt to rule out any going back to re-tee.

And I'd give a free drop out of divots.

How do you know where to drop if your ball is lost?

How do you define a "divot", and at what exact point does a divot no longer become a divot?
post #143 of 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

How do you know where to drop if your ball is lost?

How do you define a "divot", and at what exact point does a divot no longer become a divot?

 

How do you know where to drop if your ball is lost?

Maybe every hole has a drop area?  Or the last place it crossed over from fairway into rough / woods / whatever?

 

How do you define a "divot", and at what exact point does a divot no longer become a divot?

I guess a divot is a spot where a chunk of grass has been taken out of the fairway by a previous player hitting the ball.  I'd also probably include include when a ball sets down in a ball mark of a previous player - although I've never seen or heard of that happening.  

 

I see your point with wanting a line of demarcation. In my own experience and in watching TV, I don't remember having a lot of trouble determining when a ball landed in a divot.  You see a ball sitting in a spot that was previously fairway, but is now a hole in the fairway filled with sand (or worse - no sand!).  We could at least start with what is clearly a divot.

 

You see it on TV all the time and hear Miller and McCord say, "don't roll in the divot! - oh, bad break, it rolled in the divot."  Then when the player lines up to hit, Miller tells us how it is now going to make a really big divot because he's going to hit ball first then his divot will start at the spot where the existing divot ends.  Then they do a slow-mo close up of the club striking the ball in the divot.  They say divot 25+ times.  I've always taken their word for it that it is a ball in a divot.

post #144 of 398

Bring back the stymie! ;-)

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