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Straighten the right arm just after impact?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
As I have a tendency to cast out the club and get too armsy on the downswing my local pro told me to feel as if I wait to straighten out my right arm just after impact. Good advice? Is this worth practicing. Cheers
post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
Cast the club out early that is
post #3 of 17

He has given you good advise.

 

Another description would be to hold the right wrist position, which would be in the hinge position through impact. Think of a waiter carrying a tray full food or drink above their shoulder.

 

Years ago, there was a glove designed called the "Norman Secret" and more recently the "Swingyde Golf Swing Training Aid" which are products designed for practicing this drill.

 

Also, think about holding your left wrist "flat or in the straight" position until impact of the swing.

 

One can practice this exercise with or without a club in hand to get the feel of holding these hand positions.

 

Club Rat

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddog81 View Post

As I have a tendency to cast out the club and get too armsy on the downswing my local pro told me to feel as if I wait to straighten out my right arm just after impact. Good advice? Is this worth practicing. Cheers

 

Does the right arm straighten, yes. Should that been a feeling for you, maybe. 

 

Check out the videos on the forum about lag, and key 3. 

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ok cheers guys. Re club rat I once had a lesson where the pro tried to get me to bow my wrists at impact,not sure if this is what you are on about or similar
post #6 of 17

Yo Mad Dog, to bow the right wrist would also be a term to describe the same as to hinge the wrist.

This would be the position of the wrist at the top of the back swing, when the hands are head height.

It is also in referencing this position as a "waiter carrying a tray of food or drink" just to give you a visual thought.

 

When a player is at this position at the top of the back swing, the next motion is to hold the wrist "bow or hinge" position as one swings to the ball.

The next position would be to straighten out your arm after impact as the arms follow through with the swing.

 

What generally happens when a person starts the swing from the top with the wrist / hands motion, this is termed a "casting effect" of a swing.

 

As Matt indicated, there are threads which discuss "lag" which would give you great visuals of the arms swinging in motion pertaining to your questions.

 

Question, where is the Mad Dog Saloon?

 

Club Rat

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Once again that really helps me to understand and visualise,thanks RAT. And ha ha I don't know if there is a maddog saloon but my user name is maddog81 and the sand trap team must of put my avatar in! Anyway if I ever see u in there il buy u a beers
post #8 of 17
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddog81 View Post

Once again that really helps me to understand and visualise,thanks RAT. And ha ha I don't know if there is a maddog saloon but my user name is maddog81 and the sand trap team must of put my avatar in! Anyway if I ever see u in there il buy u a beers
Holding that wrist angle might be a good drill for getting a feel for flat left wrist but ultimately you don't want to be actively holding it as that will kill your speed and make your swing very non-athletic.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Holding that wrist angle might be a good drill for getting a feel for flat left wrist but ultimately you don't want to be actively holding it as that will kill your speed and make your swing very non-athletic.


Good point EJ, once the OP develops the technique of the routine, it should help his situation of preventing a casting motion.

As his skill develops, it will become natural for him to release the club and feel the power he will generate as the right wrist rolls into the swing.

Along with the proper feeling of the left flat wrist as the arms straighten in the follow through.

 

Drills and various exercises are best learned one step at a time.

At some point he will need to learn other skills and can use these suggestions as a basis for his development.

 

The MD Saloon I am familiar with is in AZ. I was curious and also found there is another in Milwaukee.

Also, I know of a MD Ranch and bar in Colorado.

 

One would be surprised to find out who I'm am referring to.

I only know because I worked on his home when it was built.

 

Club Rat

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Club Rat View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Holding that wrist angle might be a good drill for getting a feel for flat left wrist but ultimately you don't want to be actively holding it as that will kill your speed and make your swing very non-athletic.


Good point EJ, once the OP develops the technique of the routine, it should help his situation of preventing a casting motion.

As his skill develops, it will become natural for him to release the club and feel the power he will generate as the right wrist rolls into the swing.

Along with the proper feeling of the left flat wrist as the arms straighten in the follow through.

 

Drills and various exercises are best learned one step at a time.

At some point he will need to learn other skills and can use these suggestions as a basis for his development.

 

The MD Saloon I am familiar with is in AZ. I was curious and also found there is another in Milwaukee.

Also, I know of a MD Ranch and bar in Colorado.

 

One would be surprised to find out who I'm am referring to.

I only know because I worked on his home when it was built.

 

Club Rat

Yeah, just speaking from personal experience on that one. I've seen good results from holding or maintaining that bowed or flexed feeling through impact but it also became too mechanical and contrived. Very good learning process though, sometimes contrived is the only way to feel the correct position and then the journey becomes "getting there" without it being contrived.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
When having this bowed wrist lesson my pro showed me a video still of Ernie els at impact just to try and show me the technique
post #13 of 17

One thing that worked for me and still does is to lead the grip/hands through the ball first. That way you can't cast the club.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Yes that was actually what my pro had me doing the lesson b4 the bowed wrist one. I got what your suggesting going good but my club face was wide open that's when he got me to bow my wrists. He called what you said "let the hands win the race" it did held with my ball striking when done right
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

Yeah, just speaking from personal experience on that one. I've seen good results from holding or maintaining that bowed or flexed feeling through impact but it also became too mechanical and contrived. Very good learning process though, sometimes contrived is the only way to feel the correct position and then the journey becomes "getting there" without it being contrived.

 

I think contrived is a good word for it.  It has it's place in certain kinds of practice but as you know we like to say "lag happens".  What do I mean by that?  From the top of the back swing the wrist angles are gradually releasing.  To move low point forward and strike it solid you have to have a majority of your weight forward at impact.  If something is impeding you from doing that, then figure out why it's happening and get to work.  To me, working on holding wrist angles because a player is casting is fixing the effect and not the cause.  If you have your head steady and the weight forward at impact, having the handle forward at impact is much easier.  Not saying it's guaranteed but you're probably going to be in better shape than trying to hold wrist angle while not having enough weight forward at impact.  

 

Having said all that, here's a good drill for Key #3, Flat left wrist or inline impact.

 

 

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks again mvmac. On my downswing I actually start by shifting my hips towards the target and im sure my head follows a little,should I try to keep my head dead still on the whole downswing? Sorry to be a pain in the ass!
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddog81 View Post

Thanks again mvmac. On my downswing I actually start by shifting my hips towards the target and im sure my head follows a little,should I try to keep my head dead still on the whole downswing? Sorry to be a pain in the ass!

 

Not a pain at all, this site is all about discussion and sharing good information.  

 

If the head goes a little forward then no problem but we want to get the weight forward by transferring the lower body forward, not shifting the head forward.  Also "steady" doesn't mean un-moving, it just means it's ok to have some slight movement side to side.  We know the head will rotate and also lower a bit on the downswing.

 

Good thread on why we want to keep the head steady with the weight forward

 

http://thesandtrap.com/t/54115/weight-forward-and-secondary-axis-tilt

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