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Golf during cold winter months - Page 2

post #19 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

Living in Ohio, I am done for the year. I am now doing indoor practice work. Time to work on the 5 keys some more.  c3_clap.gif

Same here. I think I'll practice better in the winter anyway. For one thing there's no actual golf to be played and another thing is I find when working with a net it's easier to remain disciplined with what your goals are for the practice session. On the range I tend to slowly move away from working on specific stuff and end up just trying whack balls as far and as high as I can. The net removes that distraction entirely.
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post
 

Courses are open all year here. However it gets to a point where playability is bad enough it isn't worth it. 

The plus side about playing in the winter in Colorado is that you gain about 20 yards of bounce with your tee shot, but the bad news is that sticking greens becomes more difficult than at the Masters.

 

For me in the winter I will generally use that as a break rather than trying to play. The most that I'll really do from the time the courses freeze to the time they thaw (haven't had them freeze yet surprisingly) is little pitch and putt type activities at my house. I have some golf balls that are solid enough that I wouldn't dare hit them with a full swing in case I missed a net but are still soft enough that a pitch up to a half swing won't damage anything. I use those to try and hit flop shots, bump and runs, punch shots. I really just focus on contacting the golf ball well. For a "mat" I use the little plate that comes with the Birdie Balls sets, but only if I'm doing something where it would normally take a big divot like a punch shot. Otherwise I just have an extra carpet scrap that I'll hit off of, which is actually a fairly close feeling to real grass since it's small (only about 3" wide and 8" long) which means it'll move/give like real grass would.

 

The one thing I would recommend against is trying to do a swing overhaul without physically seeing the flight of your ball. If you can reserve some sort of hitting bay where you hit into nets it can really get you into some bad habits since you don't have the negative feedback of seeing your slice or hook in person. Those simulators for me are just as bad since the perspective follows the ball or stays at a fixed point. It's just hard to get a perspective about how far off-line you were on a shot on a simulator.

post #21 of 42
post #22 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

We go all year long here in Erie, PA.

Wish you weren't so far from Albany (and a few hundred dollars to spare!).

post #23 of 42

NYC - play all year round. My threshold is 40-45 degrees F, minimal wind for 9 holes. 30 degrees F a little wind (like this morning) for the range although once it goes below 50, it's painful to use the camera. Given global warming, I don't think I've gone a week without some kind of golf be it range or course for the last couple of years. I remember a couple of nice days in January the past couple of years.

 

Used to run and bike all year round, now just run all year, so dealing with winter is no big thing. You want cold, try getting out of a toasty bed and 5 minutes later, cycling 25 mph into the wind on a 25 degree day. Brrrr.

post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFKFREAK View Post
 

So, this was the first year that I really played golf consistently.  Got hooked at the end of last year playing a couple of times and then played roughly 40 rounds this year. I absolutely love this game but now that it's getting cold in the northeast, I'm wondering what people do once golf courses are closed.  I feel like I've made strides and would like to not regress. The only thing I can really think of is putting indoors.

 

So, what do you do?

I love living in the Pittsburgh area and playing all year long. Let's start with November when the leaves fall. (Use your old balls until all of the leaves are picked up.)  Many courses close at the end of the month, but there are several courses in the area that do stay open, and often have a reduced rate to play. From December though February we try to play once or twice per week, but are sometimes foiled by the weather. My retired friends and I use 37° as our line of demarcation for whether to play or not, although our record is 29°.  We have played in the snow, but that was not on purpose.  This usually happens when a squall comes through the area, but then is followed by sun... so, onward we go. My bag includes winter gloves and a woolly cap. I also put on warm socks and have multiple layers of shirts/sweaters/coats, so that I can take one or two off as the temperatures improve. On really cold days, when the balls go significantly shorter, we take the USGA initiative "Tee it Forward" to heart, and go to the most forward tees on the course. This usually gives us a chance to get to the green in regulation. Finally, we usually start the round with a hot cup of coffee and finish with a Hot Toddie or some other beverage to warm our bones.  I love this game!

post #25 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post
 

NYC - play all year round. My threshold is 40-45 degrees F, minimal wind for 9 holes. 30 degrees F a little wind (like this morning) for the range although once it goes below 50, it's painful to use the camera. Given global warming, I don't think I've gone a week without some kind of golf be it range or course for the last couple of years. I remember a couple of nice days in January the past couple of years.

 

Used to run and bike all year round, now just run all year, so dealing with winter is no big thing. You want cold, try getting out of a toasty bed and 5 minutes later, cycling 25 mph into the wind on a 25 degree day. Brrrr.

 

I just moved from NYC to Albany in Feb.

 

What courses are open year around in NYC/Long Island/Westchester?

post #26 of 42

This is my first true winter off (last winter I just read lots and lots and lots online and also club ho'd, which was rather dumb of me), I plan on doing lots of slow swings and mirror work, mostly to work on having my weight forward which was my biggest issue this season. Along with reading lots and lots and lots online and watching golf DVDs and vids.

 

I do have a covered/heated range about 10 mins from the office that I might hit up, along with a couple of local indoor mini golf ranges that also have simulators available on a per hour basis.

post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

We go all year long here in Erie, PA.

 



That's so AWESOME...I wish I could find a place like that in the Philadelphia area.
post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

We go all year long here in Erie, PA.

 

No bragging about that kick ass facility you guys have there. From the indoor hitting area, to the awesome large putting green, the members lounge, not overly priced soda products. :beer:

post #29 of 42

You can continue to play in New England all thru the winter typically, but you need to locate the courses that stay open all year, and continue to use the normal greens too.  As long as it's above 30 degrees out it's not too bad when you're walking and swinging, and if you dress correctly.  If the ground really freezes up it get tougher, but nothing an icepick won't solve to put your tee in the ground.  Use a lower compression ball (Bridgestone E6 or others), swing more smoothly and don't expect to shoot terrific scores.  Between the ground being hard and getting odd bounces it's hard to shoot very good scores, but it's still a great time with almost no one on the course and it's really quiet too.  Highly recommend it.

post #30 of 42

I suppose cold is relative to what we are doing.

 

For me "cold" used to be dangling by a safety belt 300 feet in the air welding on a dragline boom with the temperature at -20 in 30 mph winds. Now "cold" is walking a golf course with the temperature in the 30s with 20 mph winds. I guess I've turned into a pansy. :-D

 

On the bright side I actually hit the ball more consistently with winter clothes on (for some reason).

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

We go all year long here in Erie, PA.


Yeah, but you have to watch those "whiteouts" along Interstate 90.  They can be real "doozies."  :)

post #32 of 42
I feel for those of you who can't play for 5 or 6 months of the year. I think I'd either get a good indoor simulator or move south!

I've often thought what I'd do if I got sick or injured myself and was unable to play again. I can't find an answer so I stop thinking about it fairly quickly. a1_smile.gif
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFKFREAK View Post

I just moved from NYC to Albany in Feb.

What courses are open year around in NYC/Long Island/Westchester?

The city has at least one or two that are kept open all winter, weather permitting, of course. Check the parks department website for which ones they are this year. At least a couple on Long Island are the same, I've played a few with snow on the course so it was best to hit it where the snow ain't. Otherwise you look for the ball sized hole and dig. Bethpage, I believe, keeps one course open over the winter- usually either the Yellow or Blue IIRC. they also have temporary greens on ALL the holes, at least they did at the time I played. It's been awhile, played one time in mid February just before a trip to Bermuda to get the muscles to remember what they're supposed to do. Hard Freezes and blankets of snow is usually the only thing that will keep them closed. But once it thaws a bit and the snow melts(mostly) they'll open up again. The Randalls Island and Alley Pond Ranges are open all year and they have "heated" stalls available. Randalls Island is 5 minutes from my place, so it's my go to spot. The Toll is a bit of a nuisance, though. The Alley Pond is a bit further away but no tolls to get there from here.

But the best is just to go to Florida in late February/Early March like I do. I get some work done around my Dad's place and go play 3 or 4 rounds in nice warm weather, and then when April comes around I'm taking money from everyone still getting the rust off their 5 month old swings.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFKFREAK View Post
 

I've read about the Rukk Net Pop-Up being pretty good but a bit expensive.

 

I heard the The Callaway Tri-Ball is also good and seems a bit more in my price range.

 

Seriously - just bolt some clamps to the ceiling joists in your garage and hang TWO or more layers (a tarp, and a blanket) from the clamps.  They need to be long enough to drag at least a foot of blanket on the ground (this keeps the balls in a local area and the loose fabric gently absorbs the shock of the hits.  DON'T lock the bottom, let it hang and flop with the hit.

 

If you want to get really fancy, you can set it up from PVC pipes so you can haul it up and down on eyebolts and carabiners.

 

It's a 10 minute project that costs next to nothing.  I just don't see spending any money on the net.  The important bit is a good (spring crimped) mat at least 1.5 inches thick big enough to stand AND hit off of.  Tons of threads here on this.

post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFKFREAK View Post
 

I've read about the Rukk Net Pop-Up being pretty good but a bit expensive.

 

I heard the The Callaway Tri-Ball is also good and seems a bit more in my price range.

 

Seriously - just bolt some clamps to the ceiling joists in your garage and hang TWO or more layers (a tarp, and a blanket) from the clamps.  They need to be long enough to drag at least a foot of blanket on the ground (this keeps the balls in a local area and the loose fabric gently absorbs the shock of the hits.  DON'T lock the bottom, let it hang and flop with the hit.

 

If you want to get really fancy, you can set it up from PVC pipes so you can haul it up and down on eyebolts and carabiners.

 

It's a 10 minute project that costs next to nothing.  I just don't see spending any money on the net.  The important bit is a good (spring crimped) mat at least 1.5 inches thick big enough to stand AND hit off of.  Tons of threads here on this.

Yep, and use the savings to get the best mat you can afford.

post #36 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFKFREAK View Post
 

I've read about the Rukk Net Pop-Up being pretty good but a bit expensive.

 

I heard the The Callaway Tri-Ball is also good and seems a bit more in my price range.

 

Seriously - just bolt some clamps to the ceiling joists in your garage and hang TWO or more layers (a tarp, and a blanket) from the clamps.  They need to be long enough to drag at least a foot of blanket on the ground (this keeps the balls in a local area and the loose fabric gently absorbs the shock of the hits.  DON'T lock the bottom, let it hang and flop with the hit.

 

If you want to get really fancy, you can set it up from PVC pipes so you can haul it up and down on eyebolts and carabiners.

 

It's a 10 minute project that costs next to nothing.  I just don't see spending any money on the net.  The important bit is a good (spring crimped) mat at least 1.5 inches thick big enough to stand AND hit off of.  Tons of threads here on this.

 

Unfortunately, I went to my garage and there some beams there which would prevent a full swing.

 

So, I think my best bet would be a net in the backyard.

 

BTW - does anyone know if you can hit driver into a net and have it not be a problem at some point?

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