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post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundandFury View Post
 

Does anyone have a good plan, routine, advice, story on how they got better at putting?  Sucks to have a great ball striking day only to blow it on the greens.  

SoundandFury - I was in the same place you were one year ago and decided that this would be the year that I became a better putter.  Here was my plan:

 

  #1) Find a putter that feels right. - I have tried all sizes and shapes, but settled on a putter that is 33 inches long. This year I also went to a Lamkin jumbo grip. - I also have 4 different putters (see signature) that I like, and will use one as long as it performs on the course. Once it falters, it goes to the basement and another one gets a chance. The usual time expectancy in my bag is 2 to 3 weeks.

 

  #2) Develop a consistent pre-shot routine. The pre-shot routine that I have for all of my other clubs is very precise, and is designed to impart swing thoughts during the execution of my swing. My putting pre-shot routine up until this past winter changed from round to round and left me guessing half of the time. The routine that I developed last winter now has me in a better setup and posture, and a more consistent placement of the ball in my stance.  Consequently, I am hitting my line with much more consistency.

 

  #3) Read books on putting. Over the years I have read many different books by many different "authorities," and there are valid points to be found in all of them. The two books I liked the best were "Zen Putting" and "Dave Pelz's Putting Bible."  To sum it all up, iacas hit the nail on the head on an earlier post: "The best putters in the world all do three things: 1 ) Read greens well; 2) Hit their lines; and, 3) Control distance."  But, if you want to truly understand the art of putting, reading is the first step on your journey. “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go.” -Dr. Seuss

 

  #4) Practice on a regular schedule. Practicing regularly in my basement over the winter months was probably the key to my success.

 

Here were the results:

2012 Statistics: 35 rounds - 1140 putts - 10 rounds under 80

2013 Statistics: 35 rounds - 1090 putts - 13 rounds under 80

 

One final note. I do not subscribe to the theory that boogielicious posted, "Your intention on every putt, 1 foot or 60 foot, should be to make the putt.  That should be your mindset." I looked at Dave Pelz's statistical analysis of PGA tour pros who made the following percentage of their putts:  3 Feet: 83%; 6 Feet: 55%; 10 Feet: 33%; 15 Feet: 17%; and 25 Feet: 10%. Since my putting is not on the same level as PGA tour pros, I developed a philosophy that when my putt is more than 10 feet, I try to see how close to the cup I can leave the putt. From the shorter distances I will try to make the putt because I know the next putt will be a manageable distance. This has led to less frequent three putt greens.

 

Best wishes on your journey toward putting nirvana.

post #38 of 55

have not read the whole thread so I'm not sure if this has been suggested or not?  I am a big fan of the Puttist.  Expensive?  yes.  But it has improved my putting quite a bit and it does not take up much space and can be used almost anywhere indoors. 

post #39 of 55
Quote:

Originally Posted by SoundandFury View Post 

 

I struggle with both line and distance.  

 

Does anyone have a good plan, routine, advice, story on how they got better at putting? 

My routine is -

I start with placing a tee in the practice green and work on short solid strokes from 3ft and extend the practice to 6ft trying to hit the tee dead on.

Then I work on a few (4-8) long lag putts across the green. Follow up with uphill and then down hill rolls.

Then finish with a few solid strokes again, into a cup.

 

My thoughts on most putts are " make a good stroke"

 

Distance comes with feel and practice and trusting your stroke.

 

Sometimes there are several "lines" which a putt can be holed.

Various speed / slope / bumps and other conditions contribute to if a putt hits the hole.

"Luck" is also a factor.

 

I used to practice at a facility which had two large putting greens.

One was fairly flat and the other had tiers and intense undulations.

I liked to practice on the impossible ones, just for the challenge of trying to be successful at getting them in in two.

 

When you never leave more than you can make on your next putt, you probably have developed a solid stroke.

 

Club Rat

post #40 of 55

Well, i believe that you must always putt the ball along a straight line, never try to curve the ball by imparting some kind of spin, as done in billiards. If your straight line (say the first few feet, sometimes much less)  is well chosen the ball will naturally curve when gravity demands, if speed is also well chosen. To accomplish the straight line release from the putter head the putter must contact the ball in the center of the head, where the small mark or line is painted. And you must deliver the head to the center of the ball, as the putter head is moving on the straight line.  So that's 3 'must haves'. Line, putter head and ball. 

 

  My usual trouble comes when my mind goes to my technique, esp my hands, and not to the end result,  which is  the vision of the ball moving along the line into the cup. Tension in my forearms or hands leads to a poor delivery, loss of the straight line,  every time. 

post #41 of 55

so u answered your own question. get on the putting green. you didnt really have a plan when you starting going to the range did you? get out there! you nailed it. thats a huge part of it.

 

def groove the stroke at home whenever u can, but when youre on the green, id try long putts and really short putts. im guessing here, but youre probably not 3 putting too many mid range jumpers....and its gonna take ions of practice to get to these guys' level for making it form 15'-20' in 2013. plus they still didnt cash in 20%:0. so its not going to affect your score as much as avoiding 3 putts by knocking them in or close.....and cleaning up most of the shorties.

  90th Jim Furyk 80 rounds 17.83% 129# attempted 23# made
  91th Zach Johnson 84 17.79 163 29

 

to A) learn today's greenspeed and B) find your personal pace/tempo.......take 3 balls (preferably the same type for consistent feel) and stagger the distances from a fringe like 25', 30' and 35' away. 3 balls. 3 distances. 1 target. attempt to putt them from the middle of the green or so to the edge of the green so they just kiss the fringe. i say 3 distances so that we dont get complacent and "just rake and hit balls" like the robots on the range. Shock the system a lil bit by changing it up. I say putt to the fringe becuz we dont need a hole to get job A and B done. Plus ima huge bitch. I dont want my bitchy mind to see myself missing any more putts than it does already. i want to focus on greenspeed and personal tempo. if the ball finishes even a couple of feet right or left, its ok. if i practice at a hole its harder to think of the distance as most important. its "line line line". im tired of hearing people roll bombs up to pin high and a foot left and then complain about a misread. also if a practice green is busy i can still warm up or practice this way. Distance matters most in longer (longer, not lag, lag implies im not trying to make them. i wanna make em all) putts. be sure to hold your finish and posture and watch the ball run out completely while u feel the stroke that did the job... good or bad. if i leave a 30'er 4' short and am moving up to a 25'er next.... if i can repeat the stroke and tempo i just made im going to b really close on this next 25'er. hold your finish! i usually do this easily for my good ones and want to rush to the next ball if i dont like a result. try like 25' 30' 35' uphill and 46' 38' 32' downhill (i separate downhill putts a lil more becuz it takes a lil more dist difference between the balls for me to feel much of a difference between the strokes. and i want to feel that difference). rotate up and downhill, left and right breaking, starting with the front ball and go to the back ball, and vice verse. keep changing it up. trick your brain a lil and i think youll stay engaged and learn a lil faster. keep the putts between like 18' and 50". theres PROBABLY no need to use up practice time shooting from half court unless u play in scotland.

 

to A) create a disciplined routine and B) build confidence practice short putts. ok, B is part of A. but i like to have 2 bullet points:). take 4 or 5 balls (whatever doesnt quite fill up the cup at your course) and surround the cup. set up 5 different 18" putts from each side. come up with a routine for u. then do it each time. i go behind the ball, read the putt, pick a tiny target in the back of the cup (piece of grass, discolored paint chip in the cup, something small) walk up while looking at my target and align my putter at the target, align my body to my putter, look back at the target once again, then back to the ball and putt, holding my finish and posture for a extra second before i move to get my ball out of the cup. your routine is up to u. maybe copy someone on tour u like or do the opposite of whatever u do now:0. sorry. its too soon. thats a low blow. practice swing or no practice swing? that kinda stuff is up to u. just b sure to pick a tiny target, and do the same routine every time. Ray Allen shoots for a rivet in the back of the rim, and has the same tempo and dribble routine for each free throw he shoots. we dont have to invent the wheel. just copy the best. it takes a lot of discipline to do your routine on the practice green. but if you dont, and go to the course, then its not a routine, its not what u practiced, its different. putt a few sets each of 18", 24", 30" and 36"ers. besides maybe a few interesting "breakers", i dont go any further than that before i play. i want to c em all go in. build confidence. after you get good at it, and if its just a practice day, you can add putts up to 5'.

 

Spend like 60% of your warm up or practice putting time on short 18", 24", 30", and 36"ers with 5 balls to a tiny target in the cup for routine and confidence, and the rest with 3 balls to the fringe from staggered distances to learn todays greenspeed and your personal tempo.

post #42 of 55

One stat I always look at after a round is how many 'makeable putts' did I miss.  In and 18-hole round, the number is usually 2 or fewer.  Sometimes I make ALL of them.  Missing them is most definitely a case of 'leaving shots on the course,' IMO.

 

I call a 'makeable putt' any putt inside 5'.  Before each round, I hit the practice green with 2 balls.  I find a hole position that is relatively flat.  Starting at 2', I quickly move around the hole making 2 putts each from 12, 3, 6 & 9 clock face positions.  Move out to 3' repeat, move to 5' and repeat again.  Next, I move to a hole location that provides an uphill, downhill and side breaking putts and putt the same two balls from 2', 3' and 5' away.  I don't waste time thinking about anything but aligning my putter and putting a solid back-and-through on a straight line stroke on the ball.  Also, I don't use the alignment writing on the ball, just the alignment tool on the putter. During the round, I do use the ball alignment along with my putter alignment to make the short putts nearly automatic makes.

 

Total 2-5' practice putts is around 50 putts and takes less than 10 minutes.  After that, it's lag a few from 20, 30 and 40 feet to help me get to the inside 5' range.  I rarely 3-putt because, a) I make nearly all the short putts; and b) don't hit a lot of greens!

 

My example is a practice session that results in a 'been, there and done it a whole bunch of times' routine that helps me make putts when they count.  I came up with this regimen watching my power-forward/center son having to make 100 'chippies' near the basket after basketball practice each day.  When the ball went inside to him during games, he was automatic with the shot.  Same thing on rebounds and put backs shots.  In HS, he averaged 16 ppg. Another 'been there and done it a thousand times' process.  Same principle works for making the short putts on the golf course.

 

Hope this helps a bit.

 

dave   

post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundandFury View Post

Carded an 84 today and an 85 yesterday.  First round I had 5 three putts and two missed 4-5 footers for birdie.  Second round I had 7 three putts and one missed 4 footer for birdie.  I think it's time I started devoting the same effort to my putting as I do my full swing...

Only problem is I have no idea where to start, how to practice, etc.  Whereas I can see/feel swing changes and improvements in my full swing, my putting stroke always feels like a crapshoot regardless of what I do.  I struggle with both line and distance.  

Does anyone have a good plan, routine, advice, story on how they got better at putting?  Sucks to have a great ballstriking day only to blow it on the greens.  

haha so far two of of the three forums I checked out was started by you. Came in here to look for tips. I GIR"d the majority of the holes today with very little effort then blew it the **** up ending with nothing but triple and double bogies. Sooo knowing how lame that was here I am. Anyways tips tips tips.... I stopped reading, I realized that asking for tips wasn't going to cut it I just need to spend a little time at the greatest place around, MULLIGANS!! last time I went their I dominated the dance floor like no other. Mulligans is s miniature golf course. that's the big advice. small advice dont forget to at least play around when your their. Sounds dumb I know, but it will dramatically improve your putting. my only problem is I stopped golfing for s bit so now I have to play catch up.. MULLIGANS!!!!!!!! drive for show putt for dollar bills (I replaced "dough" with dollar bills)
post #44 of 55

Don't spend a lot of time trying to improve from 8' and beyond, this is where the best players in the world only can make 50% at best, the short ones from 3'-6' are going to give you the best return, when you gain that confidence in that 8' circle around the flag it will take tons of pressure off the lag putting and that will improve as well. Also work on keeping that head still on these putts, head movement while putting is a major cause of missed short putts.

post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post

Don't spend a lot of time trying to improve from 8' and beyond, this is where the best players in the world only can make 50% at best, the short ones from 3'-6' are going to give you the best return, when you gain that confidence in that 8' circle around the flag it will take tons of pressure off the lag putting and that will improve as well.

I disagree, both long and short need to be practiced evenly. you might as well tell someone "don't practice your driver cause your short game is whats going to gets you closest to the hole". I've got a killer short game. One of the best out of the people I play with and meet along the way and fyi everyone I play with is 10 to 20 years into it which is about 9 to 19 years more then me. And as much as I boast the chances of landing that close are evenly matched. Especially if you have a killer long game which is in my grasps. I say both, but that's just me
post #46 of 55

Just reading a newsletter on GolfWeek which has some interesting comments from Dave Stockton.

 

LAS VEGAS – Rory McIlroy and his putting mentor, Dave Stockton, were together for six hours here on Friday, participating in a Nike Golf promotional event at TPC Summerlin.

 

Straight from the 72-year-old Stockton, who twice won the PGA Championship, here is a condensed four-part putting lesson.

These are the same tips he gave to the 24-year-old McIlroy, who so far has won the U.S. Open and PGA Championship.

 

Part 1: Always read the green from the lowest side of the break. Yes, this means your most valuable read will come from the side, not behind the ball.

Part 2: Concentrate on the target. Forget about trying to make a perfect stroke. Absolutely no practice strokes allowed. Visualize the ball on its intended path. See and feel the line.

Part 3: Do not become frozen at address. Putt quickly once you are over the ball. One look and go.

Part 4: Right-handers should allow the back of the left hand to guide the putter toward the target. For left-handers, it’s the back of the right hand.

 

I agree with Part 1,3 and 4, but I'm not really thrilled with some of the aspects commented in Part 2.

 

I do agree with having a target and visualizing the path, along with seeing and feeling the line. This is must for players to execute on every putt.

 

But I do not agree with not having any thoughts of executing a good putting stroke and "Absolutely no practice strokes allowed."

 

Guess it worked OK for him, but I'm not on-board with those two ideas he has suggested.

 

It will be interesting to see if Rory heeds this advice and does not take any practice strokes on a green next season.

 

Club Rat

post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Club Rat View Post
 

Just reading a newsletter on GolfWeek which has some interesting comments from Dave Stockton.

 

LAS VEGAS – Rory McIlroy and his putting mentor, Dave Stockton, were together for six hours here on Friday, participating in a Nike Golf promotional event at TPC Summerlin.

 

Straight from the 72-year-old Stockton, who twice won the PGA Championship, here is a condensed four-part putting lesson.

These are the same tips he gave to the 24-year-old McIlroy, who so far has won the U.S. Open and PGA Championship.

 

Part 1: Always read the green from the lowest side of the break. Yes, this means your most valuable read will come from the side, not behind the ball.

Part 2: Concentrate on the target. Forget about trying to make a perfect stroke. Absolutely no practice strokes allowed. Visualize the ball on its intended path. See and feel the line.

Part 3: Do not become frozen at address. Putt quickly once you are over the ball. One look and go.

Part 4: Right-handers should allow the back of the left hand to guide the putter toward the target. For left-handers, it’s the back of the right hand.

 

I agree with Part 1,3 and 4, but I'm not really thrilled with some of the aspects commented in Part 2.

 

I do agree with having a target and visualizing the path, along with seeing and feeling the line. This is must for players to execute on every putt.

 

But I do not agree with not having any thoughts of executing a good putting stroke and "Absolutely no practice strokes allowed."

 

Guess it worked OK for him, but I'm not on-board with those two ideas he has suggested.

 

It will be interesting to see if Rory heeds this advice and does not take any practice strokes on a green next season.

 

Club Rat

I'm okay with Part 2.

 

I read Dave's book about 2 years ago. If you take a practice stroke, do it behind the ball. Or take a one hand stroke over the ball to keep you loose and approximate the stroke. When you get over the ball, he wants you looking at your line, and he wants you to not stand over the ball. He has me looking at a spot about an inch in front of the ball - so I'm not even looking at the ball when I stroke the putt. I think the intention is to make you less "ball aware."

 

When I screw up a putt, it's because of tension or poor rhythm/tempo, not because of a lack of a practice stroke.

post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post
 

I'm okay with Part 2.

 

I read Dave's book about 2 years ago. If you take a practice stroke, do it behind the ball. Or take a one hand stroke over the ball to keep you loose and approximate the stroke. When you get over the ball, he wants you looking at your line, and he wants you to not stand over the ball. He has me looking at a spot about an inch in front of the ball - so I'm not even looking at the ball when I stroke the putt. I think the intention is to make you less "ball aware."

 

When I screw up a putt, it's because of tension or poor rhythm/tempo, not because of a lack of a practice stroke.


I sometimes line up my practice stroke behind the ball when I want to imagine the line or see the spot I intended to try and roll the ball over.

I do not stand over a putt ever! It would lead to becoming tense or allow unwanted thoughts.

 

My routine is to prepare for the putt while waiting for my turn. I will sometimes watch another players ball roll across the green to determine the speed, slope and roll out. And I always try to watch from low side, perpendicular to the path of the ball, out of the players line of sight.

 

Then if I wait for the next player, I will make a few short practice strokes, mainly concentrating on making a solid stroke through a imaginary ball.

My eyes never leave the ball until the putter strikes the ball and I watch the putter follow through, then watch the roll of the ball.

 

If it is my turn right away, then it's just a quick look behind the ball, take a couple of quick waggle stokes, take a couple of deep breaths and exhale, setup and pull the trigger. Sometimes I even "Hum" on occasion to relieve tension, which I also do on tee shots.

 

My weakness comes from letting the left wrist bend slightly just before impact, which causes a right hand push (open toe), mainly when I disrupt my routine or sometimes just being too tentative with my stroke.

 

As you motioned, being less ball aware, that makes sense. I think we have the same concept as picking out a spot in front of the ball, my spot is the putter follow through.

 

I can tell if a player is going to make or miss most putts, just by watching their stroke. Most player who make putts, the putter follows the ball to the target. When they miss, is usually is due to the stroke stopping after impact.

 

But I feel a practice stoke makes me aware of feeling the putter, with how far back and the follow through as I make the stroke.

 

Club Rat

post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Club Rat View Post
 


I sometimes line up my practice stroke behind the ball when I want to imagine the line or see the spot I intended to try and roll the ball over.

I do not stand over a putt ever! It would lead to becoming tense or allow unwanted thoughts.

 

My routine is to prepare for the putt while waiting for my turn. I will sometimes watch another players ball roll across the green to determine the speed, slope and roll out. And I always try to watch from low side, perpendicular to the path of the ball, out of the players line of sight.

 

Then if I wait for the next player, I will make a few short practice strokes, mainly concentrating on making a solid stroke through a imaginary ball.

My eyes never leave the ball until the putter strikes the ball and I watch the putter follow through, then watch the roll of the ball.

 

If it is my turn right away, then it's just a quick look behind the ball, take a couple of quick waggle stokes, take a couple of deep breaths and exhale, setup and pull the trigger. Sometimes I even "Hum" on occasion to relieve tension, which I also do on tee shots.

 

My weakness comes from letting the left wrist bend slightly just before impact, which causes a right hand push (open toe), mainly when I disrupt my routine or sometimes just being too tentative with my stroke.

 

As you motioned, being less ball aware, that makes sense. I think we have the same concept as picking out a spot in front of the ball, my spot is the putter follow through.

 

I can tell if a player is going to make or miss most putts, just by watching their stroke. Most player who make putts, the putter follows the ball to the target. When they miss, is usually is due to the stroke stopping after impact.

 

But I feel a practice stoke makes me aware of feeling the putter, with how far back and the follow through as I make the stroke.

 

Club Rat

Left wrist breakdown may be a grip issue - I kept on changing my grip method until I found one where the right hand did not interfere with other parts of the grip.

 

As to practice strokes, I think setting up pre-address into a rehearsal may cause tension. It brings in the reality of stroking the putt. Another way to take a practice stroke is to take it behind the line of the ball, and then walk to address the ball, or do an informal practice stroke --- anything that does not create tension, and then take your address position and make the stroke.

post #50 of 55

Putting is the bane of my existence.    I feel your pain... my only advice & the only positive I can add with regard to putting is that I know I'm not gonna make many of  those 5-10 footers, so just really focus on distance control to MAKE 100% sure the next one will be nothing more than a tap in (with good distance control, you'll even make a few here and there).    Leaving an 8 footer 3 ft long is absolutely disasterous and to be avoided at all costs - puts a ridiculous amount of unnecessary pressure on you for the follow up & if you miss it, is demoralizing.    Distance control is where it's at - at least for my game. 

post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenIn2 View Post


I disagree, both long and short need to be practiced evenly. you might as well tell someone "don't practice your driver cause your short game is whats going to gets you closest to the hole". I've got a killer short game. One of the best out of the people I play with and meet along the way and fyi everyone I play with is 10 to 20 years into it which is about 9 to 19 years more then me. And as much as I boast the chances of landing that close are evenly matched. Especially if you have a killer long game which is in my grasps. I say both, but that's just me

Yes you are right, you do boast,  one year into this game and a killer short game and of course no index (not saying it's that important but if your going to talk yourself up at least show us why like a swing video) internet golf stud.:doh:

post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post

Yes you are right, you do boast,  one year into this game and a killer short game and of course no index (not saying it's that important but if your going to talk yourself up at least show us why like a swing video) internet golf stud.d2_doh.gif

You wish I would post a video so you can learn from me. Why is it so important for me to pay for someone to tell ME what I hit. I know what I hit. Par 72, gir the majority of the holes, 2 put minimum, you do the math and tell me what my handicap is. Your just mad I didn't like your advice due to the fact that EVEN A LOW HANDICAP PLAYER LIKE YOURSELF won't land 8 feet to the pin or closer the majority of the time. Maybe it's because of your logic is why you will ALWAYS have a handicap. At least post something good like the ones before your dumb reply. I might even put that four step putting bs to the test.
post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post
 

Left wrist breakdown may be a grip issue - I kept on changing my grip method until I found one where the right hand did not interfere with other parts of the grip.

 

As to practice strokes, I think setting up pre-address into a rehearsal may cause tension. It brings in the reality of stroking the putt. Another way to take a practice stroke is to take it behind the line of the ball, and then walk to address the ball, or do an informal practice stroke --- anything that does not create tension, and then take your address position and make the stroke.

Grip issue can certainly lead to miscues in the putting stroke. Especially when the hands become too active.

 

Other causes occur when not feeling when the putter has reached the full motion of the back swing and the stroke starts the forward motion.

(Putter is in motion going back, shoulders/arms/hands start forward motion), generally followed with slight left wrist hinge.

 

Tension is a part of the game. It occurs with the first tee ball jitters and can last throughout the entire round for many players.

Any type of routine which helps a player relax during execution of play may only benefit that individual, while others may have different means.

It's similar to people who have superstitions.

 

I'm still not on board with the thought of Dave's suggestion in Part 2 - "Absolutely no practice strokes allowed."

 

A player needs a means to calm their tension, when needed. Many have develop routines to help in these matters.

Certainly, a practice swing or "pre-address into a rehearsal" as you refer to, may cause tension for some, but not everyone.

 

A player who has a solid putting game, generally has conquered many of the demons this game gives birth to

and relies on a routine which they benefit from.

 

Club Rat

post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Club Rat View Post
 

Grip issue can certainly lead to miscues in the putting stroke. Especially when the hands become too active.

 

Other causes occur when not feeling when the putter has reached the full motion of the back swing and the stroke starts the forward motion.

(Putter is in motion going back, shoulders/arms/hands start forward motion), generally followed with slight left wrist hinge.

 

Tension is a part of the game. It occurs with the first tee ball jitters and can last throughout the entire round for many players.

Any type of routine which helps a player relax during execution of play may only benefit that individual, while others may have different means.

It's similar to people who have superstitions.

 

I'm still not on board with the thought of Dave's suggestion in Part 2 - "Absolutely no practice strokes allowed."

 

A player needs a means to calm their tension, when needed. Many have develop routines to help in these matters.

Certainly, a practice swing or "pre-address into a rehearsal" as you refer to, may cause tension for some, but not everyone.

 

A player who has a solid putting game, generally has conquered many of the demons this game gives birth to

and relies on a routine which they benefit from.

 

Club Rat

I read his book.

 

He does not say "absolutely," or I don't remember that word.

 

I will look it up, but I distinctively remember him saying - a one-armed rehearsal to keep you loose while looking at the line is fine. I think recalling him writing, if you must, do the rehearsal behind the ball on the line of the putt, or something similar.

 

He wants you thinking about the line of the putt and staying loose rather than the length of the stroke, which may have you thinking "mechanics."

 

You can get a feel with a one-armed rehearsal, just keep your eye on the line.

 

But do what works for you.

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