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Why Don't You Take Lessons? - Page 10

post #163 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by march11934 View Post
 

And how would you go about finding the right instructor without wasting a bunch of money testing out each one? Is there an interview process in finding out their swing theories?

 

http://thesandtrap.com/b/playing_tips/the_instructor_quiz_nine_questions_youve_gotta_ask

 

 Mario's Instructor Quiz 

post #164 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post
 

 

http://thesandtrap.com/b/playing_tips/the_instructor_quiz_nine_questions_youve_gotta_ask

 

 Mario's Instructor Quiz 

Very interesting read, thanks. Helps clarify some of the confusion out there. So if a potential student approached you with this list, would you address the questions by demonstration? 

post #165 of 173
Great question. It's an interview process so there is potentially some trial/error involved. Don't sign up for multiple lessons without making sure you and your instructor are on the same page. A good place to start is to try to understand what type of student you are and your personal learning style. Are you a "feel" learner " or a "visual" learner? Are you analytical and need lots of data ? Do you have some better golfers that you know? Ask them who they use and why. Find out how they learn and whether the instructors's style sounds like it might work for you.

You can find information and teaching philosophies for most of your local teaching pros on their web sites. This should help narrow the list and this doesn't cost a thing. In addition, most good instructors are willing to meet with perspective students to discuss goals and philosophy. The key is to try to find an instructor whose philosophy and teaching style match the way you learn and your goals. Do you want /need a "tune up" or an overhaul? What amount of time "post lesson" are you willing to commit? I think the biggest thing is to be brutally honest with yourself on what you hope to accomplish with lessons and what effort /time/commitment you're willing to invest. Most importantly, don't pay for a multiple lesson plan until you're sure it's the right person for you.
post #166 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by march11934 View Post

Very interesting read, thanks. Helps clarify some of the confusion out there. So if a potential student approached you with this list, would you address the questions by demonstration? 

Based on my experience, good instructors usually have before and after photos and videos, an internet trail that probably hints at teaching methods and beliefs, many years of experience and lots of good word of mouth.

But bottom line is there is no better way to find out than to take an actual lesson. And you should improve straight away if it's a live in person lesson. Online, the process is a little longer depending. ymmv.
post #167 of 173

In my case, about 2 weeks ago I thought I was hitting ball fairly well at the range, went to play 9 with my Son, and I couldn't seem to hit 2 shots in a row without skulling it. So, I booked a lesson with our own Mike, and Dana at El Dorado in Long Beach. Both of these pro's knew from the get go what some of my problems were, and straightened my out on what to do Right.

 

The really cool thing was, I had 2 teachers looking at my swing from 2 angles.The one thing I noticed was, they had My best interest at heart. I got a video lesson on the things I need to work on, so I have that forever if I need to fall back on it.

 

If you are in the So. Cali area, it will be more than worth your time and $$ to see Mike, or Dana, or both..I've had lessons in the past, these guys are second to None. And no, Mike didn't pay me to say this..LOL

post #168 of 173

I totally agree with you. The reason that most people don't take lessons is because finding a golf instructor is a very cumbersome task.

post #169 of 173
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mizzyluvr View Post

Great question. It's an interview process so there is potentially some trial/error involved. Don't sign up for multiple lessons without making sure you and your instructor are on the same page. A good place to start is to try to understand what type of student you are and your personal learning style. Are you a "feel" learner " or a "visual" learner? Are you analytical and need lots of data ? Do you have some better golfers that you know? Ask them who they use and why. Find out how they learn and whether the instructors's style sounds like it might work for you.

This is great advice.  The more active role you take in your lessons by trying to understand what works and doesn't for you from a learning perspective the better off you will be.  You should have high expectations of a coach/instructor and expect them to work with you on a learning and practice plan to reach your goals.  With many instructors you may need to ask for help in creating a plan. If you don't have any goals for your game you need to start right there...

 

As our database of reviews grows we will be able to help you move from just asking your friends (better golfer or not) about a pro to seeing what many more people think of the different instructor options in your area...

post #170 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by march11934 View Post
 

Very interesting read, thanks. Helps clarify some of the confusion out there. So if a potential student approached you with this list, would you address the questions by demonstration? 

 

Sure whatever they needed to gain some clarity.  A lot of it is just deconstructing myths that are so common in the golf world.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post

 

The really cool thing was, I had 2 teachers looking at my swing from 2 angles.The one thing I noticed was, they had My best interest at heart. I got a video lesson on the things I need to work on, so I have that forever if I need to fall back on it.

 

If you are in the So. Cali area, it will be more than worth your time and $$ to see Mike, or Dana, or both..I've had lessons in the past, these guys are second to None. And no, Mike didn't pay me to say this..LOL

 

Appreciate that, it was a pleasure getting to work with you.  

post #171 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post

. . .

 

If you are in the So. Cali area, it will be more than worth your time and $$ to see Mike, or Dana, or both..I've had lessons in the past, these guys are second to None. And no, Mike didn't pay me to say this..LOL

 

Ditto this.

post #172 of 173

I am at the point that I know my swing. that being said I play with a couple of my pros alot and they give me a tune up if asked. I find it helpfull to have a second set of "eyes" check me out from time to time.

post #173 of 173

I have a read a few posts and I guess I follow along most folks reasoning -- they hit a wall and they need to improve beyond the capability they currently have.

 

I have a golf pro I use from time to time to help me along.  Mostly though I am thankful I have a golf pro that has given me tools to fix most of my issues.

 

He kept it simple.  So if all else fails I have a reset button on my swing and it all starts with the set-up.  I get the set-up right then everything else pretty much falls into place.  

 

I guess the biggest positive golf lessons or better still a series of golf lessons is the fact you learn or are mentored by someone who has seen/played the game a lot longer than you.  They may just have the tools to help you fix it and teach you a few tricks in the process.  

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