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Why Don't You Take Lessons? - Page 2

post #19 of 173
Because they just don't care.

Let's face it, most golfers don't play all that often, and when they do, it's simply a game. A way to spend some time with their buddies. It's not about the game. They'd like to be better.....but only because better is, well, better. They don't care enough to take lessons, or practice, because how good they are just isn't all that important to them in the grand scheme of things.
post #20 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Because they just don't care.

Let's face it, most golfers don't play all that often, and when they do, it's simply a game. A way to spend some time with their buddies. It's not about the game. They'd like to be better.....but only because better is, well, better. They don't care enough to take lessons, or practice, because how good they are just isn't all that important to them in the grand scheme of things.

 

I would agree with regard to the few times a year, casual golfers.

 

However, as you've read, there are a bunch of serious golfers who don't fit into that group and would rather not incur the expense for lessons or perhaps enjoy the challenge of learning golf on their own using the multitude of resources available today (which was not the case in years past)

post #21 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthehole View Post

I would agree with regard to the few times a year, casual golfers.

However, as you've read, there are a bunch of serious golfers who don't fit into that group and would rather not incur the expense for lessons or perhaps enjoy the challenge of learning golf on their own using the multitude of resources available today (which was not the case in years past)

Those are a minority. Most golfers, just aren't as serious about the game as the relative few of us on the forum.
post #22 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post


Those are a minority. Most golfers, just aren't as serious about the game as the relative few of us on the forum.

I agree with that.  I think many people are introduced to golf through a business or charity event  and get hooked for a bit only to  give it up because the game was harder than they anticipated. 

 

I have at least 4-5 family members went that route.   They were hooked on the game for a year and after struggling to improve and not seeing satisfactory results, quickly lost interest.  Their $1000 set of clubs sit in the garage and only come out for a few business and charity events each year.

post #23 of 173

Because people are resistant to change, and if they know their golf swing is not very good they know a teacher is going to want to do major changes.

post #24 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReviewMyGolfPro View Post
 

I'm still floored by the fact that most golfers have never or rarely ever taken lessons. ...

 

I'm floored by this, and all the people who take lessons but never practice.

 

One pro I know gives people homework (so many specific practice sessions) after a lesson, and won't schedule the next one until they can describe what they did in their practice sessions.

post #25 of 173

A lack of time, money, or maybe they feel they can sort out the issue themselves. Sometimes you can, and sometimes you can't. I got to that point a little while ago and knew I was close, but I just wasn't getting the job done on my own, so I got a lesson. It helped and continues to help me a lot at the moment.

post #26 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Let's face it, most golfers don't play all that often, and when they do, it's simply a game. 

 

I think even avid golfers don't take many lessons.  I'll define an avid golfer as someone that plays about four times a month. 

post #27 of 173

Lowkie, where did you get that misspelled Titleist picture? 

post #28 of 173

Money being the issue - perhaps - but less so now then before. Two words. Online instruction. I know of instructors w/online only students who made a lot of progress without live lessons, one w/students who go from beginner (140s) to shooting in the 70s, only doing online lessons and I'm sure there are others, though rare, like him. So play one less round a month and spend that on a lesson, online lessons are much cheaper than live ones.

 

Live lessons has huge advantages over online, given a choice between the same instructor live vs online I'd take live every time of course, but if given a choice between an excellent pro online and one who's, meh, or average, in person, I'd take online every time.

 

Even w/the startup costs - camera, tripod, driveway markers - you come out ahead, cost wise. Less money spent on gas too, less travel time, more time to practice.

 

One thing I found about online lessons. It keeps me on point. I put the video on my smartphone and watch it over and over again. The beauty of this is you can watch it anywhere, at the grocery store, on the porcelain throne, waiting in the car, etc.. I think pounding the lesson into me keeps me from wandering and instills discipline.

post #29 of 173

So far I've found that you should get a lesson to help control your swing path and club face....then you can take video of yourself and watch it or post it here for some help on adjusting anything else.

 

That's just my personal opinion on my first 6 months.  

post #30 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post
 

 

I think even avid golfers don't take many lessons.  I'll define an avid golfer as someone that plays about four times a month.

 

Agree.  Heck, I don't have to look any further than in the mirror......and I play a helluva lot more than 4 times a month.

post #31 of 173
I plan on taking lessons for the first time next spring when the season starts, but I must admit I have concerns about getting hooked up with an instructor who ends up setting my progress back. I don't belong to a private club and don't have many friends locally who golf (at least not seriously) so it's going to be a bit of a crap shoot when it comes to finding an instructor. Not so much worried about the $$$ or the time commitment but, like anything else I suppose, I'd like to know going in that if I put the time in that I will eventually see the results.
post #32 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by GangGreen View Post

I plan on taking lessons for the first time next spring when the season starts, but I must admit I have concerns about getting hooked up with an instructor who ends up setting my progress back. I don't belong to a private club and don't have many friends locally who golf (at least not seriously) so it's going to be a bit of a crap shoot when it comes to finding an instructor. Not so much worried about the $$$ or the time commitment but, like anything else I suppose, I'd like to know going in that if I put the time in that I will eventually see the results.

Get 1 lesson, he'll most likely fix your swing path (or try), if you aren't satisfied then post a video of your swing here.  

post #33 of 173

Why?

 

Instructors. Money. Laziness.

 

Golfers don't know whom to go or whom to trust; and

 

Golfers are cheap when it comes to lessons; or instructors don't do a good job of marketing themselves to make it seem worthwhile.

 

Golfers would rather look for the easy solution - a new driver or putter - rather than admit they are the problem and force themselves to work on those problems.

post #34 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReviewMyGolfPro View Post
 

On the quote above, I wonder if its about the money or the fear that the money wont be well spent.  I think for many, if they KNEW it was going to mean markedly better golf the money would be easily parted with.

No need to wonder in my case - it's about the money. Even though I had a less-than-spectacular experience with lessons, there are just too many low cappers at TST who have benefited from them. Oddly, I think I have more confidence that a good coach is the way to go after going through my experience. Your website is a great idea even though the instructors in my area have no reviews yet.

 

Golf is not inexpensive. I think I've done it about as cheap as possible: Unlimited course membership for 2013 (no cart): $100. Golf balls, tees, etc: $60. A used set of Adams A4's, Speedline Driver and 3 wood, a used Sun Mountain bag, a new 60* wedge and 5 wood: all for around $300. Oh yeah, there was also the cost of a new shaft for my 5 iron after it "slipped" out of my hands. :whistle:.

For as much enjoyment as I get out of it, it has been money well-spent.

 

This past winter, my four lessons cost $160 - IMO, inexpensive. Had I learned a proper iron swing, I believe I'd be playing consistent bogey golf. I have since purchased the 5SK video. My plan now is to use a mirror, video and feel to develop the 5 simple keys. If I have the extra cash next year, I may take a lesson or two in hopes of addressing one glaring weakness at a time. Maybe this plan is naive but taking weekly lessons is simply not an option.

post #35 of 173

Mostly money.  I think lessons are very good for basics.  Someone learning should get a couple right off.  But regular lessons are a luxury and depending on who the instructor is can be pretty expensive.  I think if I'm doing something and find more than a couple ways to do it, I'd want lessons just to make sure I'm exploring the correct options.  Or if I have something specific I'm trying to achieve, then I'd want a lesson or two to get started correctly.  Even better, teach me the basics and goals, such that I can be self-guided for a much as possible.

 

But, when you see a McLesson on TV by some of the world's best, and you just see them provide the same old drills, or some gadgety way to attack or look at something, then my impression on value-add just takes a nose dive.

 

I've had two, relatively cheap lessons and the input and drills were great and he said "go work on these this season, you have enough to play with for a couple months" - I really appreciated that, he helped my game and didn't try to turn it into a regular paycheck.  I did the drills, did a followup lesson and got huge gains.

 

Conversely, I've talked (no lesson) to a couple very high end (expensive) instructors to scope out their methods, and they wanted to immediately retune my swing dramatically to something 'trendy' that actually caused physical pain in my wrists.  Same guys have not helped a golf buddy at all.

 

So much depends on the instructor - However, if there is video and the occasional Trackman involved, then I'm ok with it.  I'd still say that if someone can coach the basics only, then anything after that one can develop for themselves - provided they understand how the body works, and the physics involved.  That's not "self taught", it's "put me on the right path and just provide course corrections occasionally while I drive the boat"

post #36 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

Mostly money.  I think lessons are very good for basics.  Someone learning should get a couple right off.  But regular lessons are a luxury and depending on who the instructor is can be pretty expensive.  I think if I'm doing something and find more than a couple ways to do it, I'd want lessons just to make sure I'm exploring the correct options.  Or if I have something specific I'm trying to achieve, then I'd want a lesson or two to get started correctly.  Even better, teach me the basics and goals, such that I can be self-guided for a much as possible.

 

But, when you see a McLesson on TV by some of the world's best, and you just see them provide the same old drills, or some gadgety way to attack or look at something, then my impression on value-add just takes a nose dive.

 

I've had two, relatively cheap lessons and the input and drills were great and he said "go work on these this season, you have enough to play with for a couple months" - I really appreciated that, he helped my game and didn't try to turn it into a regular paycheck.  I did the drills, did a followup lesson and got huge gains.

 

Conversely, I've talked (no lesson) to a couple very high end (expensive) instructors to scope out their methods, and they wanted to immediately retune my swing dramatically to something 'trendy' that actually caused physical pain in my wrists.  Same guys have not helped a golf buddy at all.

 

So much depends on the instructor - However, if there is video and the occasional Trackman involved, then I'm ok with it.  I'd still say that if someone can coach the basics only, then anything after that one can develop for themselves - provided they understand how the body works, and the physics involved.  That's not "self taught", it's "put me on the right path and just provide course corrections occasionally while I drive the boat"

 

I think this is really good advice. Not only would you get a head start on learning some basic fundamentals, you wouldn't have to break bad habits later.

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