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Why Don't You Take Lessons? - Page 3

post #37 of 173

Interesting thread topic.

 

I've played golf for 27 years, including playing competetively at the junior, high school, and college level.  I really, really love golf.  I enjoy playing and I enjoy playing well when I do. 

 

I came to this forum because I love golf and love talking about golf, but I don't get too much involved in the "how to swing" threads.  I've never posted a "my swing" thread.  I've got some ideas about how to play golf well, and I've learned a lot here, but I just don't get all that involved in that aspect of it.

 

I haven't taken a lesson since I was in college.  I hated competetive college golf, and I quit playing for two years after I quit my golf team.  I play as often as I can, but I don't "work on my game" in the traditional sense.  I might get a tip here, work through it a bit in front of my mirror, and hot 40 or 50 balls on the range before a round--but other than that I'm "working through" things on the course.  I pretty much just play golf.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ReviewMyGolfPro View Post
 

I think for many, if they KNEW it was going to mean markedly better golf the money would be easily parted with.

 

Maybe.  I'm fairly certain that if I "worked" on my game, to include taking some lessons and ingraining the changes, I'd get better.  I could be a pretty solid scratch +/- 1 on just about any course--maybe better.  But that's what I hated about college golf:  hours on the range, struggling to get better, etc.  Golf is fun for me.  Range work is not.  If I knew that I could get some good tips in 3 lessons and work on it for a month and shave 2 shots, then yes--I would do it.  The cost wouldn't be much of an issue if I knew that I would get the results.  But that's not how it works, and I've got neither the time, patience, or inclination for an open-ended obligation to "work" on my game.

 

I can actually isolate 1 aspect of my game that could easily benefit from 3 lessons and a month of practice:  60-120 yard wedge shots.  I guess if I had a decent practice facility near me, and time to dedicate to it, I would do that.

post #38 of 173

The #1 stated reason, far exceeding any others, in large polls: lack of time.

post #39 of 173
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GangGreen View Post

I plan on taking lessons for the first time next spring when the season starts, but I must admit I have concerns about getting hooked up with an instructor who ends up setting my progress back. I don't belong to a private club and don't have many friends locally who golf (at least not seriously) so it's going to be a bit of a crap shoot when it comes to finding an instructor. Not so much worried about the $$$ or the time commitment but, like anything else I suppose, I'd like to know going in that if I put the time in that I will eventually see the results.

 

GG if that's your plan my reco would be to find a few candidates and talk to them about their teaching philosophy and what your goals are in taking a lesson.  Too many of us go to a Pro and are like help me but don't really have an idea what they really want to work on.  Good luck!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post
 

Why?

 

Instructors. Money. Laziness.

 

Golfers don't know whom to go or whom to trust; and

 

Golfers are cheap when it comes to lessons; or instructors don't do a good job of marketing themselves to make it seem worthwhile.

 

Golfers would rather look for the easy solution - a new driver or putter - rather than admit they are the problem and force themselves to work on those problems.

 

Mr D. we are trying to help answer the first issue, but we need a bigger library of reviews to do that.  Too soon yet to say we can solve that, and why I'm hoping many in this thread will make some contributions to our new site.  If these posts are any indication many of you would do great reviews.  Having said that I don't think golfers are any cheaper than the general pop.  This sport is just an expensive one to play regularly.  Agree with point 3 though with many folks (to be fair though, marketing works!).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

Mostly money.  I think lessons are very good for basics.  Someone learning should get a couple right off.  But regular lessons are a luxury and depending on who the instructor is can be pretty expensive.  I think if I'm doing something and find more than a couple ways to do it, I'd want lessons just to make sure I'm exploring the correct options.  Or if I have something specific I'm trying to achieve, then I'd want a lesson or two to get started correctly.  Even better, teach me the basics and goals, such that I can be self-guided for a much as possible.

 

Agree whole heartedly.  When my son started, he wanted me to teach him, I took him to see a great teacher in my area who had experience teaching middle school kids to play.  He learned so much faster than he ever would have with me on the range.

Thanks all for your thoughtful posts!!!

post #40 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekUA View Post
 

Lowkie, where did you get that misspelled Titleist picture?

I actually got it off google lol.  I didn't really study it all that closely:cry: and funny enough your the first one who's noticed it :bugout:.  I have since obviously changed it though.  Thanks for the heads up!

post #41 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

The #1 stated reason, far exceeding any others, in large polls: lack of time.


the problem with that, is that people that can afford to golf seem to have this as their general gripe about everything.  so it's pretty much just a generic answer they throw out for any non-golf related question also.  It's a clear cultural thing in a majority of areas of the US at least.  sometimes without even thinking. "Oh, I'm so busy".

 

 

I find it odd that this is the main gripe from people that choose an activity that takes up half a day.

 

I'd like to see people answer these polls and be forced to provide their next answer after that one.  I think the learning would be much more useful in application.

post #42 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

I find it odd that this is the main gripe from people that choose an activity that takes up half a day.

 

That doesn't mean it's any less valid of an answer. By your logic, "too expensive" is an equally bad reason because they already spend money on golf.

 

Say a golfer has only six hours a week of free time. They choose to spend it playing golf rather than taking a lesson and practicing.

 

It's not just a casual or easy excuse. It's the very real reason. We see it in a very real way and have had great success with both our online instruction and in-person instruction giving people drills that they can do for five minutes a day to improve their golf game.

post #43 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
It's not just a casual or easy excuse. It's the very real reason.

 

I can't claim either way as a general answer.

I would depend on each individual.

 

I can only say I've seen this excuse used extensively - exactly as a casual or easy excuse.  or, at least, the quick and habitual response.  In my business it's a weak excuse many people just reflexively throw out without much thought.  "I didn't have time to complete that."  more accurately I'd respect "I didn't make time to complete that" - I can work with that.  I can't create more time.  Anecdotal proof is crappy, so it's just my impression and opinion.

 

In reality, it's a statement that says "it's not important enough to prioritize over other things".  Drilling down into that is worth it.  "not enough time"?  IMHO is a dead end response - it's real, but not as actionable as getting into it deeper.

 

 

 

However---- Kudos on offering ways to address it in a practical way for this activity.  And, as a service provider, I'd expect nothing less than your response in whole (taking the statement seriously and calling it 'real', and then trying to work it).

post #44 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

I can only say I've seen this excuse used extensively - exactly as a casual or easy excuse.  or, at least, the quick and habitual response.  In my business it's a weak excuse many people just reflexively throw out without much thought.  "I didn't have time to complete that."  more accurately I'd respect "I didn't make time to complete that" - I can work with that.  I can't create more time.  Anecdotal proof is crappy, so it's just my impression and opinion.

 

In reality, it's a statement that says "it's not important enough to prioritize over other things".  Drilling down into that is worth it.  "not enough time"?  IMHO is a dead end response - it's real, but not as actionable as getting into it deeper.

 

I think you continue to slight it - and people, and their opinions, and situations - by calling it an "excuse."

 

Yes, people can make time for things, but they can also set aside money for things, or do a bunch of other things that render their "reasons" moot. But so what? If you take that approach to everything, any reason they ever give is "an excuse." That gets us nowhere.

 

The question of this thread is "why don't more golfers take lessons" and I'm telling you that every poll I've ever seen conducted across a large sample comes back with "not enough time" as - by far - the #1 reason. It's a secondary discussion whether that reason is legitimate or just the first thing people think of, but in my experience, there's more meat to it than just calling it an excuse allows. People are busy these days, and it's perfectly believable to me that "not enough time" is at the top of their list of reasons.

 


 

This thread should have been titled "Why don't YOU take more lessons?" The question "Why don't more GOLFERS take lessons?" has already been asked many many times and answered. I'll change the title now.

post #45 of 173

IMO, its all about pride.  People think that they can figure it out on their own and worry that someone is going to try to completely rebuild their swing, basically making them start back at square 1.

post #46 of 173

I have been playing for 5 months. I am 29 and I average 85 a round. I struggle with my distances but my irons are very accurate. Driver is 200 yards with a fade/slice which I am working on.

 

I had 4 lessons (1 a week) when I first started. I just felt it was more a watch and tell lesson where he would just watch me and say you are doing this wrong, try this. Fair enough it helped me out at the start but after the 3rd lesson it just felt like I was wasting my money. For £23 for half hour I found most of the stuff he told me was actually on youtube. 

 

If we had a pro with some technology in my area I would definitely have at least one lessons every few weeks. I would love to actually see for myself what I am doing wrong as I think the older traditional way of teaching is hard to work on as you can't see what you are doing wrong.

 

I myself would love to work on my game at the range but my closest range is as the course I play which is a 10-15 minute drive. The range is rather expensive I think at £3.30 for 50 balls. I pay green fee's for the year which is really cheap so I just tend to play at least twice a week doing 18 holes and I love it. I go on the field whenever I have spare time with my wedges working on simple drills and short game (the cricket pitch is perfect for this lol)

 

Any suggestions on if I should try another pro or just stick with youtube/playing.

post #47 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klarkus View Post
 

I have been playing for 5 months. I am 29 and I average 85 a round. I struggle with my distances but my irons are very accurate. Driver is 200 yards with a fade/slice which I am working on.

 

I had 4 lessons (1 a week) when I first started. I just felt it was more a watch and tell lesson where he would just watch me and say you are doing this wrong, try this. Fair enough it helped me out at the start but after the 3rd lesson it just felt like I was wasting my money. For £23 for half hour I found most of the stuff he told me was actually on youtube. 

 

If we had a pro with some technology in my area I would definitely have at least one lessons every few weeks. I would love to actually see for myself what I am doing wrong as I think the older traditional way of teaching is hard to work on as you can't see what you are doing wrong.

 

I myself would love to work on my game at the range but my closest range is as the course I play which is a 10-15 minute drive. The range is rather expensive I think at £3.30 for 50 balls. I pay green fee's for the year which is really cheap so I just tend to play at least twice a week doing 18 holes and I love it. I go on the field whenever I have spare time with my wedges working on simple drills and short game (the cricket pitch is perfect for this lol)

 

Any suggestions on if I should try another pro or just stick with youtube/playing.

You've been playing for 5 months.

 

Your average score is 85.

 

Your handicap is 27.

 

This doesn't add up…

post #48 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

You've been playing for 5 months.

 

Your average score is 85.

 

Your handicap is 27.

 

This doesn't add up…

 

lol I don't have a handicap yet I thought everyone started on 27. I do know this is not true but to sign up it needed a handicap so I just put 27. I know I am a lot lower just got a natural gift for golf ;)

post #49 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klarkus View Post
 

 

lol I don't have a handicap yet I thought everyone started on 27. I do know this is not true but to sign up it needed a handicap so I just put 27. I know I am a lot lower just got a natural gift for golf ;)

Well that certainly is impressive.

post #50 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

Well that certainly is impressive.

 

So I have been told lol. I played a couple times when I was very young and even then people told me I have a very natural swing. Shame I never carried on as a child and took it up late.

post #51 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klarkus View Post
 

 

So I have been told lol. I played a couple times when I was very young and even then people told me I have a very natural swing. Shame I never carried on as a child and took it up late.

You should start a My Swing thread. Lots of people will offer up advice and, depending who offers it, some of it is top notch.

post #52 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

You should start a My Swing thread. Lots of people will offer up advice and, depending who offers it, some of it is top notch.

 

Awesome I will take a look thanks. This site is amazing there is so much great advice.

 

Oh I forgot to mention I worked out my handicap from 3 straight rounds and it added up to my handicap being 16.3. However that was on my own lol. I'm sure its a lot more pressure when you are getting your official handicap with someone taking down your score.

post #53 of 173

Great topic, here are some of my thoughts:

  1. The choice between a round of golf vs. a lesson and practice is not trivial, both from a financial or time management point of view.  
  2. Everybody approaches the game differently.  We are communicating here on an (excellent) golf forum so it is safe to assume that we are all enthusiasts and our goal is to become the best golfers we can be, so lessons make a lot of sense.  For many of the golfers I've encountered, especially at the local muni's and other public courses, being scratch is not the goal, they are just playing to have some fun, get away from reality for a bit, etc. etc.  I envy them sometimes.  
  3. When someone is first starting out with golf, from square one, getting lessons is without a doubt the fastest way to lower scores and build confidence.
  4. I have only had two lessons from a PGA apprentice at my local course and I sort of view him as a doctor for my swing.  I really only see him when my swing is sick..basically when I am struggling with something specific in my ball striking.  First lesson for me was because I had a tendency to hook my irons.  Second was to cure a slice with the driver.  The thought of having a weekly lesson seems beneficial but impractical to me.  
post #54 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Entropy View Post
 

Great topic, here are some of my thoughts:

  1. The choice between a round of golf vs. a lesson and practice is not trivial, both from a financial or time management point of view.  
  2. Everybody approaches the game differently.  We are communicating here on an (excellent) golf forum so it is safe to assume that we are all enthusiasts and our goal is to become the best golfers we can be, so lessons make a lot of sense.  For many of the golfers I've encountered, especially at the local muni's and other public courses, being scratch is not the goal, they are just playing to have some fun, get away from reality for a bit, etc. etc.  I envy them sometimes.  
  3. When someone is first starting out with golf, from square one, getting lessons is without a doubt the fastest way to lower scores and build confidence.
  4. I have only had two lessons from a PGA apprentice at my local course and I sort of view him as a doctor for my swing.  I really only see him when my swing is sick..basically when I am struggling with something specific in my ball striking.  First lesson for me was because I had a tendency to hook my irons.  Second was to cure a slice with the driver.  The thought of having a weekly lesson seems beneficial but impractical to me.  

 

 

I think one a week is too much it doesn't give you time to work on what you have learnt. I agree with when you are first starting out to get a few lessons. I think if you can a pro with technology would be a lot better money spent.

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