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Castle Tees?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

I have a RBZ driver and I am trying to figure out which tee's to use. I much prefer the castle tee as its the same height every time. I tried the pink but I caught it a bit on the high side and the white (2inch) is just a little below the middle. I have been trying to lift the white tee up slightly which works pretty good (contradicting myself there a bit lol).

 

I watch a great guy on youtube and he was making fun of the pink castle tee's. I don't know why though. Does anyone know why and do you prefer to use regular or castle tee's?

post #2 of 26

I don't even know what a castle tee is. 

 

Standard, plain old wooden tee.  I push it into the ground as far as I need to.  Sometimes higher, and sometimes lower, depending on the shot, club, and conditions.

post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
 

I don't even know what a castle tee is. 

 

Standard, plain old wooden tee.  I push it into the ground as far as I need to.  Sometimes higher, and sometimes lower, depending on the shot, club, and conditions.

 

post #4 of 26
If that's what gives you a constant tee height,
go for it.

I like the wooden Pride Golf tees. The ones that are painted white with the yellow stripe work well for me.
post #5 of 26

I never understood the appeal of fancy tees.  I mean really it is not that hard to figure out what height is good for you with a plain white tee.  Add to the fact that you can get a bag that lasts two years for three bucks.

post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klarkus View Post
 

 

 

Ok, thanks.  I've seen similar tees in the store, but don't know that I've ever seen anyone play them.

 

How do you adjust the height for different clubs, wind conditions, turf conditions, and the specific shot desired?  Do you carry 4 or 5 different lengths?

post #7 of 26
I used castle tees for the first few years I played:

Orange (7mm) for iron tee shots.
Red (13mm) for 3w tee shots.
Pink (39mm) for driver.

The best thing about them is the relative consistency with tee height (there's always going to be a certain amount of discrepancy depending on the tee box grass length, softness of turf etc) while I was improving my swing mechanics.

Other than the consistency there's nothing "fancy" about the tees and they last a lot longer than the normal wooden ones I now use.
post #8 of 26
This past season I played with whatever wooden tees the pro shop had and seeing as I almost never hit driver on my home course I used an awful lot of broken tees. In past seasons I used these:


I though they were great except they don't seem to make a longer version so they are a tad short for modern drivers. It's nice to just keep one tee in your a pocket and a spare in the bag and know your good for the round. I once played a whole season with just one of these tees, I was a little sad when I finally lost it.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by badfish74 View Post
 

I never understood the appeal of fancy tees.  I mean really it is not that hard to figure out what height is good for you with a plain white tee.  Add to the fact that you can get a bag that lasts two years for three bucks.

 

I gotta agree.  Seems like a solution in search of a problem.  But then, there's an old saying in the fishing industry.......most fishing lures are designed to catch fisherman, more than fish.  :-)

post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by badfish74 View Post
 

I never understood the appeal of fancy tees.  I mean really it is not that hard to figure out what height is good for you with a plain white tee.  Add to the fact that you can get a bag that lasts two years for three bucks.

 

 

How do you know you are teeing it up the right height everytime? You tee up 1/4 inch too high and you going to sky it. 1/4 too low and you are catching the bottom. Theres no way to be sure you are teeing it up the right height everytime with a plain white wooden tee. I have tried using just normal tees but I always doubt how high I have it. The castle tee's here in the UK are very cheap and because they are plastic they last a lot longer.

post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klarkus View Post
 

How do you know you are teeing it up the right height everytime?

 

I don't think it's all that difficult to put a tee in the ground to within about 1/4 inch every time.

 

Additionally, I can hit good tee shots with the ball teed up higher or lower. I simply alter my swing a teeny tiny bit to compensate. Sometimes I simply alter how I'm addressing the golf ball. I've hit solid tee shots off tall golf pencils (too long to be legal as tees).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klarkus View Post
 

You tee up 1/4 inch too high and you going to sky it. 1/4 too low and you are catching the bottom.

 

I don't mean this to be offensive, but given your handicap index, it's unlikely you consistently strike the ball in the center 1/4" of the clubhead, and even if you did, the modern driver has more than 1/4" of forgiveness between topping the ball and popping it up…

post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klarkus View Post
 

How do you know you are teeing it up the right height everytime?

 

I don't think it's all that difficult to put a tee in the ground to within about 1/4 inch every time.

 

Additionally, I can hit good tee shots with the ball teed up higher or lower. I simply alter my swing a teeny tiny bit to compensate. Sometimes I simply alter how I'm addressing the golf ball. I've hit solid tee shots off tall golf pencils (too long to be legal as tees).


But if it's one less thing to think about and you put it into the ground to within 1/8 of an inch every time sure that's a good thing for higher cap players who are already juggling stand width, ball position, distance from the ball, stance line, knees/hips/shoulders, grip, rhythm etc in the swing?

As a professional or as a low handicap player you have the ability to hit shots with higher tees, lower tees, driver off the deck and a whole multitude of shot shapes as you see fit. For a high handicap player just getting the ball in play is difficult enough and as you also said there's no way a high cap player will hit the club face in the same spot every time, let alone be able to "compensate" for knowing the tee is too high/low etc.

I use wooden tees now because I like the fact that it's more traditional and in keeping with the unwritten ethos of golf and frankly I had enough of people bitching at me for using them; I wanted an easy life on the course (I still get this with AimPoint however!).
If I ran out of wooden tees though I'd still use the old castle tees I have hanging around in my golf drawer.

post #13 of 26

Maybe but my experience is the high handicap golfer has more problems than ball height. When I was that golfer it had little to no affect on the quality of my shot. If it did it was happenstance because I rarely did anything the same way twice. Either way quite unnecessary considering you can use the top of your driver as a gauge to tee it up pretty close to the same height.

post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post
Either way quite unnecessary considering you can use the top of your driver as a gauge to tee it up pretty close to the same height.

Bingo.

post #15 of 26

I agree completely regarding the high capper's ability to strike the club in the same place regularly.

What's easier:

1. A static target (pretty consistent tee height with castle tees) against a moving target (erratic swing)
2. A moving target (inconsistent tee height) against another moving target (erratic swing)?

Seems to me that lessening one of those variables is a better option at that level.

post #16 of 26
You asked for opinions, you got them but it's your $$$ so use whatever tees you want. If the consistent height tees helps with your confidence I say go for it. Stick the darn thing in the ground as far as it will go and swing, no need to fiddle with it holding everyone up taking measurements and what not.
post #17 of 26

Step tees make sense to me.  Sure you could use the top of your driver as a "gauge" for ball height, but then you need to address the ball to see whether you've gotten it right, and make adjustments from there.  Who wants to make people wait while they go through that process?

 

I used to use them myself but stopped after I realized the darn things break or disappear after every shot (only tried a couple of different brands).

post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

I don't think it's all that difficult to put a tee in the ground to within about 1/4 inch every time.

 

Additionally, I can hit good tee shots with the ball teed up higher or lower. I simply alter my swing a teeny tiny bit to compensate. Sometimes I simply alter how I'm addressing the golf ball. I've hit solid tee shots off tall golf pencils (too long to be legal as tees).

 

 

I don't mean this to be offensive, but given your handicap index, it's unlikely you consistently strike the ball in the center 1/4" of the clubhead, and even if you did, the modern driver has more than 1/4" of forgiveness between topping the ball and popping it up…

 

I don't have an official handicap but I know the calculations to working it out and last time I did it was 16.3. I have since got even better so I will let you know in the future. You should know that when you register to this site you must put a handicap to proceed further. 

 

I never knew how much forgiveness there was with tee's I just automatically thought you have to tee it up right every time and this just came with more experience (the reason I always used castle tee's). Thanks for the info though and I am currently watching your 5SK videos they are really helping me out.

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