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Tee boxes that just screw with your head

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

You ever have a tee box aim to the right, yet you know to hit the fairway, you need to aim left of where the tee box points you, but something about the look of the hole or something about the teeing area f*&ks with your head and you start aiming right despite knowing it's mistake. I swear, it's gotta be psychosomatic. tl;dr - Sometimes I think too much.

post #2 of 29
Damn course designers! c4_mad.gif
post #3 of 29

Man up and deal with it. 

post #4 of 29
Yep. Ignore the tee markers and aim for the fairway.
post #5 of 29

Yes, it does screw with my head. How hard can it be to align the painted rocks perpendicular to the fairway? Of course, they are probably asking "how hard can it be to ignore the rocks?". 

post #6 of 29

I've seen it before where they laid out the markers at a 45* angle to the fairway before due to a rock wall lining the edge of the tee box. The best advice I have for you is to tee it up as far away from the markers (correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you get two club-lengths behind the box?) as you're allowed to and then ignore them to the best of your ability. The best way to do that for me is already a part of my regular routine: Focus in on the target so that it pushes all your other thoughts out of your mind.

post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pretzel View Post
 

I've seen it before where they laid out the markers at a 45* angle to the fairway before due to a rock wall lining the edge of the tee box. The best advice I have for you is to tee it up as far away from the markers (correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you get two club-lengths behind the box?) as you're allowed to and then ignore them to the best of your ability. The best way to do that for me is already a part of my regular routine: Focus in on the target so that it pushes all your other thoughts out of your mind.

 

Wouldn't it be ironic if you just missed carrying a bunker or water hazard by 1 club length? :-$

post #8 of 29
At my old course we had a winter mat that aimed about 50 yards out of bounds. Now that definitely screwed with your head. I think this is where visualisation becomes very important a1_smile.gif
post #9 of 29
If you tee up right in the line between the markers you will only be able to see one marker. Seems to me that if you can only see one you can angle yourself however you want without having the imaginary line between markers mess with your head right? Your mind wants to take a stance that is perpendicular to that imaginary line which shouldn't be a problem if you can only see one marker.
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pretzel View Post
 

I've seen it before where they laid out the markers at a 45* angle to the fairway before due to a rock wall lining the edge of the tee box. The best advice I have for you is to tee it up as far away from the markers (correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you get two club-lengths behind the box?) as you're allowed to and then ignore them to the best of your ability. The best way to do that for me is already a part of my regular routine: Focus in on the target so that it pushes all your other thoughts out of your mind.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonMA1 View Post
 

Yes, it does screw with my head. How hard can it be to align the painted rocks perpendicular to the fairway? Of course, they are probably asking "how hard can it be to ignore the rocks?".

 

I think that @nevets88  is talking about the tee box being aligned to an angle away from the fairway.  That's usually a course design feature intended to do exactly what he's talking about here.  The tee markers have little to do with it because as EJ  pointed out, you only see one at a time anyway (unless you have eyes in the back of your head)......

 

One way to get used to that is on the practice range.  Intentionally pick targets that aren't right in front of you.......as far off perpendicular to the range as possible.  That will force you into a mindset of aiming for a specific target, rather than where the range (tee box) is trying to point you.

post #11 of 29
Quote:

Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
 

......

 

One way to get used to that is on the practice range.  Intentionally pick targets that aren't right in front of you.......as far off perpendicular to the range as possible.  That will force you into a mindset of aiming for a specific target, rather than where the range (tee box) is trying to point you.

 

This is solid advice no matter whether the scenario is that the actual "teeing ground" is aimed in an awkward direction or if the minimum wage guy on the mower slapped the markers down at random spots once he was done.  I like to place my tee with an eye toward being properly behind the markers and then completely put 'em out of my mind when I go about aligning my shot.  For me, it helps to pick a spot on the ground a foot or so out in the direction I want to go which I use to begin my setup.  That gives you something else to think about besides the angel of the markers or the tee itself.  Same deal as if you are trying to cut the corner on a dogleg.

 

Personally, I find bunkers inconveniently placed where my drive wants to land much more annoying than the alignment of the tee box. :~(

post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by PirateJim View Post

 

This is solid advice no matter whether the scenario is that the actual "teeing ground" is aimed in an awkward direction or if the minimum wage guy on the mower slapped the markers down at random spots once he was done.  I like to place my tee with an eye toward being properly behind the markers and then completely put 'em out of my mind when I go about aligning my shot.  For me, it helps to pick a spot on the ground a foot or so out in the direction I want to go which I use to begin my setup.  That gives you something else to think about besides the angel of the markers or the tee itself.  Same deal as if you are trying to cut the corner on a dogleg.

 

Personally, I find bunkers inconveniently placed where my drive wants to land much more annoying than the alignment of the tee box. " src="http://files.thesandtrap.com//images/smilies/new/a5_crying.gif">

 



I finally started doing this (picking an intermediate spot to set up to) this past weekend and it really seemed to help. I struggled all season long with aim/alignment (particularly on approach shots) so tried this the last time out and I believe it made a noticable difference. Mind you, it wasn't like I was hitting every fairway/green all of a sudden, but I did notice my ball flight just seemed to be much much closer to what I intended.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by PirateJim View Post
 

 

This is solid advice no matter whether the scenario is that the actual "teeing ground" is aimed in an awkward direction or if the minimum wage guy on the mower slapped the markers down at random spots once he was done.  I like to place my tee with an eye toward being properly behind the markers and then completely put 'em out of my mind when I go about aligning my shot.  For me, it helps to pick a spot on the ground a foot or so out in the direction I want to go which I use to begin my setup.  That gives you something else to think about besides the angel of the markers or the tee itself.  Same deal as if you are trying to cut the corner on a dogleg.

 

Personally, I find bunkers inconveniently placed where my drive wants to land much more annoying than the alignment of the tee box. :~(


I think you mean perfectly placed :-D

 

What I tend to do in these situations is tee up on the side of the tee box that is were the tee box is pointing. So if it aims you right, I tee up on the right side. This allows me to aim pretty strongly against the visual aiming. If I aim on the left side, then the visual is subtle, and I can mess up. From there I will hold up my club in front of me to get the line I want, and trace it down to a point on the tee box that I can aim at. This allows me to take away the visual of the hole, and the tee box. Then I really focus on aiming up at that point. 

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

If you tee up right in the line between the markers you will only be able to see one marker. Seems to me that if you can only see one you can angle yourself however you want without having the imaginary line between markers mess with your head right? Your mind wants to take a stance that is perpendicular to that imaginary line which shouldn't be a problem if you can only see one marker.

 

Some markers "point" in a direction, though. Like the little skinny pieces of wood at Augusta National. :) What then!?!? :D

post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Some markers "point" in a direction, though. Like the little skinny pieces of wood at Augusta National. :) What then!?!? :D

 

You're screwed!   :-D

 

I know that tee markers are deemed to be fixed, and although I can't find anything definitive in the Rules or Decisions, I've always inferred that to mean that they cannot even be "rotated" to aid in alignment.  Correct?

post #16 of 29

I usually don't look at how the tee box is aligned.  So I have no problem with them.  But I know a lot of people who have problem when the tee markers and/or the tee box are not pointed towards the fairway.

 

Personally, I can't see why that should be a problem as I pick out a target to hit to and align accordingly.  But that's just me.

post #17 of 29

I aim where I need to aim and then check I'm behind the invisible line between tee markers and fire away. The direction of the tee box has never entered my head (unless it's way off and then the only thought is, "what muppet faced the tee box that way?")

post #18 of 29
So I've had this problem before. I was wondering if having an intermediate target would fix (or at least help fix) this problem? I've never used an intermediate target so if I start how far out is the object from the ball?
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