or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › what forms of golf etiquette do you ignore and why?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

what forms of golf etiquette do you ignore and why? - Page 3

post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Discussion of hats is now officially off topic. I've already linked to existing threads for the discussion of when to remove or continue wearing hats. Use those threads to continue the discussion.

 

:offtopic:

For those that missed it because it's a new page.

post #38 of 49

Seems to me it fits here perfectly well. 

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post
 

For those that missed it because it's a new page.

 

 Shaking Hands With Your Foursome / Removing Your Hat on 18th Green? 

post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post
 

I don't always stay behind the person w/ball furthest back in play - I walk ahead, but well out of sight and keep an eye out when person is about hit. Saves a lot of time, especially when you're not sure where your ball is, more time to look.

 

People standing close is the worst. It's okay if they're behind me and I can't see them, but right in front or to my right, I hate that - I let them know about it as tactfully as I can, but inside it really annoys me.

 

This is probably the etiquette "rule" I break most often.  But I'm very conscientious about not walking up to my ball anywhere where I'm in the way.  I'll typically walk up ahead way off the side even with my ball and make sure I'm well off the side, behind the tree line if there is one.

 

The second one I probably break more often than I should too, though not as regularly.  I'm usually pretty zoned in on the course and am almost never visually distracted, rarely audibly distracted.  I've had many people apologize to me after I hit a shot about some distraction they caused and I have no idea what they're talking about.  So honestly I'm probably not as vigilant in making sure I don't cause visual distractions for other players as I could be, just because it's never a problem I have.  I never make noise obviously, and I never stand where I could take a face on video or anything, and I of course also don't move when someone's hitting.  But I've probably annoyed a few players standing not exactly behind them (I mean to their rear, not on the target line away from the target!) or something on a shot here and there.

post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

I don't know why you would think that there is anything wrong with this.  You aren't even required to lift your ball in the first place unless requested to do so.  Replacing it in preparation to play is perfectly fine as long as it isn't in someone's way.  I often just mark with the toe of my putter, quickly wipe off any dirt if necessary, then immediately replace it.  That's no breach of anything.

 

 

I had always marked the spot with my putter, mostly because I play alone a lot, and since its only me it made sense. Done it for years, and my regular group didn't seem to mind a bit.  I did it playing with a group of strangers last year and one of them made a smart comment like "got it where you want it?". I kind of raised my eyebrows at him, and he said I was lifting and placing incorrectly and needed to take a penalty stroke. I wasn't sure if he was right or not, and didn't have a clue where to look to make sure, so I just ignored it. At least now I know. 

post #42 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDog66 View Post
 

 

My wife has health issues so I keep my phone on so I can hear it.  If I am playing with other than my regular partners, who all know this, I tell my fellow players and I have yet to have anyone who seemed to care about it.

Same basic problem, and my regular playing partners don't care about any ring.  I deal with the phone differently when I'm with unfamiliar players, but if I need to be ready to take a call I will let people know, put the phone on vibrate and put the phone in my pocket.  In hindsight I think my phone bothered a guy once.  At the time I thought he was bothered because he owned a thousand dollar set of irons but couldn't make a shot or keep a ball in play.  Now I'm thinking it was my rudeness for taking one call.   

post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perfect Slicer View Post
 

I had always marked the spot with my putter, mostly because I play alone a lot, and since its only me it made sense. Done it for years, and my regular group didn't seem to mind a bit.  I did it playing with a group of strangers last year and one of them made a smart comment like "got it where you want it?". I kind of raised my eyebrows at him, and he said I was lifting and placing incorrectly and needed to take a penalty stroke. I wasn't sure if he was right or not, and didn't have a clue where to look to make sure, so I just ignored it. At least now I know. 

There is nothing worse than a rules-nazi who doesn't know the rules.  Unless you were playing a match with the guy he has no business making any comment at all.  But even if you WERE playing a match with the guy he is completely wrong, and there is a Decision exactly on point:

 

Quote:
 

20-1/16

Method Used to Mark Position of Ball

Q.The Note to Rule 20-1 provides that "the position of a ball to be lifted should be marked by placing a ball-marker, a small coin or other similar object immediately behind the ball." Is a player penalized if he uses an object that is not similar to a ball-marker or small coin to mark the position of his ball?

A.No. The provision in the Note to Rule 20-1 is a recommendation of best practice, but there is no penalty for failing to act in accordance with the Note.

Examples of methods of marking the position of a ball that are not recommended, but are permissible, are as follows:

  • placing the toe of a club at the side of, or behind, the ball;  (emphasis added)
  • using a tee;
  • using a loose impediment;
  • scratching a line, provided the putting green is not tested (Rule 16-1d) and a line for putting is not indicated (Rule 8-2b). As this practice may cause damage to the putting green, it is discouraged.

However, under Rule 20-1 it is necessary to physically mark the position of the ball. Reference to an existing mark on the ground does not constitute marking the position of a ball. For example, it is not permissible to mark the position with reference to a blemish on the putting green.

When moving a ball or ball-marker to the side to prevent it from interfering with another player's stance or stroke, the player may measure from the side of the ball or ball-marker. In order to accurately replace the ball on the spot from which it was lifted, the steps used to move the ball or ball-marker to the side should be reversed.

 

Not recommended, but permissible.  Pretty much says it all.  You were fine and he is wrong and, possibly, a jerk.

post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

Discussion of hats is now officially off topic. I've already linked to existing threads for the discussion of when to remove or continue wearing hats. Use those threads to continue the discussion.

 

:offtopic:

Well, the topic was "What forms of golf etiquette..."  We will, of course, obey your dictate.

post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkuehn1952 View Post
 

Well, the topic was "What forms of golf etiquette..."  We will, of course, obey your dictate.

 

I disagree that discussion of when to wear hats is golf etiquette. There are plenty of "golf etiquette" things to discuss - where to stand, when to putt, etc. - that occur while playing golf, not while eating in a room at a golf course. Especially since we have threads for what to do while eating at a golf course. :)

post #46 of 49

The only etiquette rule that I have a habit of breaking came from playing in tournaments. Provided that you are not directly in a player's line of play or in another distracting location many of the players, including myself, at local junior tournaments will walk ahead quietly to our balls while another player is hitting behind us. This is simply to help with pace of play and facilitated by the fact that not many of the people playing will miss-hit a ball poorly enough for it to be a large safety concern provided you pay adequate attention. It happens in every group though and has become the norm in those situations, though I will occasionally catch myself walking ahead when playing practice rounds and will always wait up and stop unless my group is holding up the pace of play.

post #47 of 49
Thread Starter 

the first form of etiquette mentioned on the USGA list is safety, and the first item on the safety list got some airtime: "Players should ensure that no one is standing close by or in a position to be hit by the club, the ball or any stones, pebbles, twigs or the like when they make a stroke or practice swing."  

 

My regular group walks and plays ready, which means our guys routinely get in front of the player who is away.  Occasionally, when I'm in front at an angle where one of my hacker friends could possibly hit me, I make sure to stop and watch the player strike his ball so, if he mishit in my direction, it would be my responsibility, not his, for me to avoid his errant ball.  Its a simple courtesy, which seems to be routinely honored by walking ready golfers, but its not in the USGA list.  This seems to be adequate mitigation of the safety rule.  But I admit, I routinely ignore what USGA wrote, and thats why.

 

Where I don't ignore the recommendation is when I'm taking a practice swing.  I do not take a practice swing in the direction of my playing partners.  I would like to say I never do it.  I do however see newbies and experienced golfers give this no thought.  If you're a reckless practice swinger, consider this piece of advice to be my xmas present to you.

post #48 of 49
My group is informal but courteous with regard to being quiet while others are making a stroke, avoiding putting lines, and sanding divots. Not everyone is as good about ball marks. I try to at least follow the practice of fix yours and one more, so that takes up some slack. My course recently put in sand boxes and sand bottles on the cart, so that has improved my divot awareness.

We play ready golf, and really other than for organized tournaments, I see that as becoming the standard of etiquette through the green with the possible exception of on the putting surface.

I really hate phones on the golf course, putting green, or driving range. I understand that there are true needs such as an infirmed or incapacitated dependent, physicians and other first responders on call. These people might really not be able to play otherwise. I understand having the phone with you but on silent in case of your own emergency.There are a few other legitimate needs to not have your phone on silent, but not many. I once got a call on the course from someone who needed something from me. I had the phone on silent by the way, but I do check for messages occasionally. I only had a hole left to play, but I left and took care of the issue. The person had had all day, but they made their lack of planning my emergency. They were in a bind, so I helped them out. The point is not what a great guy (or sucker) I am, but that really the information age has everyone in a right now mode. The definition of emergency has expanded to mean anything I want right now. If there is a customer whose needs are so great that one needs his phone on at the golf course, perhaps there would be a better time to play.

A couple of years ago, I replaced the axle on my Z-71 in the parking lot of a convenience store, deftly getting my man card and my redneck endorsement renewed in one glorious event. I say that to say I am not stiff necked nor a slave to decorum, but still there are certain standards of behaviour that should be upheld, and common courtesy is one. Sadly, the lack of manners has become the norm, and this attitude has crept into one of the last bastions of politeness, the golf course.

Sorry for the diatribe; soapbox stowed. Carry on.
post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbuck View Post

A couple of years ago, I replaced the axle on my Z-71 in the parking lot of a convenience store, deftly getting my man card and my redneck endorsement renewed in one glorious event.

 

 

the fact that you own a z-71 proves that you are both a man and a redneck, albeit a well-spoken (written?) one at that... :beer:

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Golf Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › what forms of golf etiquette do you ignore and why?