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Experiences of a New Golfer

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Just to be up front, I am a new member with The Sand Trap and this is my very first post.  I'm also a 58 year old male, 5'9" and 165 pounds.  I was reasonably athletic when I was a young guy, but as an adult, life sometimes takes you in different directions.  I played golf for a year or two in  my teens, but quit.  Now that I'm considering retirement in a few years, I have become interested again, so back in May I bought a $60 set of clubs off Craigs List (Wilson, graphite, medium flex), bought some of those plastic practice balls and got out in my back yard. After about a month, I thought I wouldn't embarrass myself too badly at the driving range, as long as I could go way to the end and be by myself, and that seemed to work okay.  In July I learned what an executive golf course is, found one in my area, thought I might be at least as good as some out there, so I've tried to play once a week.  Along the way, I've had to overcome golfer's shoulder and to get golfer's elbow at least semi under control, with the help of a physical therapist.

 

All I want to do is  play well enough to have fun and not get frustrated.  I understand the importance of lessons and how one is likely to learn bad habits without them.  Still, I'm pretty good at teaching myself up to a point, and I decided I'd postpone lessons until I reached a point of diminishing returns.  I think I've just about max'ed out my distance with the irons.  Pitching wedge is around 90-100, 8-iron is 125 or so, 5-iron is 140-150.  I've hit longer than those distances, but of course I've also hit shorter.  I recently bought a 5-hybrid with a senior flex and hit that 165-175 out on the course.  Consistency is less of a problem if I can hit at least twice a week.  I might badly mis-hit a bucket of 45 balls fewer than 5 times, only slightly mis-hit fewer than 10 times, and mostly solidly hit the rest of the time.  My practice routine at the range is to start with the PW and work my way to the long irons.  

 

Understanding that the driver is the most challenging club to hit consistently, I saved that for last to work on.  I found I really couldn't hit the driver that came with the original clubs I purchased, so I hit through the summer and fall with the 3-wood.  Distances ranged from 150-175 yards (tops), which was frustrating because all the distance charts said that I should be able to hit farther based on the distances with  my irons.  But this was all when I wasn't trying that hard with the woods and still learning the irons.  Recently, having decided that the irons are okay for now, I started paying more attention to driving the ball.  I've read a lot of articles, watched various videos, and on and on.  The most important thing I did was to take time to understand what it means when someone says, "you need to stop hitting with your arms and start hitting with your body."  The other fortunate thing I did was to purchase a 460cc driver with a higher (13 degree) loft to accommodate what I imagine is a slightly under 80 mph swing speed (although I haven't been tested).  I've also purchased some low compression golf balls and gotten some very good exercises from my physical therapist that have helped me rotate my hips to the proper back swing position and at least make a decent attempt at keeping the left arm fairly straight.  All this had an immediate impact on my drives, which have a fairly decent trajectory now and reach top carry distances of 195 yards.  Consistency is definitely my biggest problem here.  I hit maybe one in three drives straight.

 

With all this information, I'm wondering:

 

-  Have I about max'ed out my driving distance now?

 

-  What can I do to get more drives in the fairway?

 

-  How do you develop a consistent swing with the various aches and pains that come with being almost 60 years old?

 

-  What can I do to keep from losing over the Winter all that I've learned since May and then just having to re-learn it when Spring is here again?

 

-  What would you have done differently?

 

-  Where do I go from here?

 

Comments in any of these areas would be most appreciated.

post #2 of 18

I'm over 50 (53 to be exact) so feel I can comment.  First off, welcome back tot he game.  It's a game where when you can't walk anymore, they have golf carts to get us around.  I plan on playing a long time!

 

Here are some thoughts:

 

1. Learn and work on your short game. If you have a local course with a practice green that you can chip to and putt on, visit the place at least once or twice a week and practice, practice, practice.  Chip with different clubs to holes/pins of varying yardages.  Practice 2-5' putts religiously, work on 10 and 15-footers and lagging from long-distance.  This is the part of the game on which we can greatly improve.  A good short game keeps you in the ball game from a scoring perspective.  All a bad short game does for any of us is to help balloon UP scores.

 

2.  I don't know anyone getting older that's actually hitting the ball farther.  I have pretty new clubs; clubs that were fitted to me;  they don't go any farther than the clubs I was playing with 10 years ago.  Maybe LESS far.  We're just getting older and our swing speed and ability to accurately move our body decreases over time.  My theory only.  My 'bombs' off the tee with driver go 220-230.

 

3. Play to 100 yards out and let your wedge(s) and short game take over.  There's a good reason most PGA tour players have 3 wedges (some carry 4) in the bag at all times.

 

4.  Get fitted for a driver or 3-wood by a certified PGA teaching professional or club fitter.  You may actually want to stay with a 3-wood and skip the driver.  You'll probably walk out of a fitting with a club you can tee up with confidence and hit it 200 yards in or very near the fairway on a regular basis.  From the tee box, the goal is getting the ball in play consistently and out there as far as you can most of the time.

 

5.  Hybrids are great.  Drive ball, pull out hybrid, eat up some yardage and get into wedge and short-game range.  Before you know it, you'll be making mostly bogies and some pars along the way.

 

6.  My wife plays.  Her bag consists of a 460cc driver, a 7-wood, #5 and 6 hybrids, 7-9 irons, PW, AW and SW and a putter. Surprisingly, driver is the best club in her bag!  140-160 down the middle 4 out of 5 times.  She plays a really nice game and doesn't have any long-woods or irons in the bag.  If you just play the right tee boxes commensurate with the length you can hit, you should be able to get around any course without having to hit 3-wood to reach the par-4 holes. 

 

7.  As soon as you decide if golf is a long-term deal, get fitted for new clubs.  The technology designed and built into today's clubs is a beautiful thing.  Playing on old and mismatched clubs is a serious road block to progress, IMO.

 

Last thing and it relates to #7:  I used to teach guitar to kids.  When the 'buying a guitar for my kid' discussion came up, I'd ask the parent if he or she really wanted to their child to learn and continue on with guitar playing.  If the answer was 'no, not really,' I'd say, 'great, go to a garage sale or Craigslist and buy a $25 acoustic guitar that you can fly a plane under the strings and give it to your child.'  The guitar will be so difficult to play the kid will give up immediately.

 

On the other hand, if the parent actually wants the child to continue on, we discuss buying the RIGHT equipment so that the child can be successful.  Gear that actually promotes learning. Same thing with golf gear.

 

Hope this helped you get back in the game in some small way.

 

dave

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Dave. I really appreciate your comments and the welcome back. I hope to play a long time, as well. Re your thoughts:

1. I do have several local courses with chipping and putting greens. I went there probably 5-10 times during the summer, but certainly not as much as I should. I will take this suggestion to heart, as I enjoy the short game. Just need to wait for the temps to get out of the 30s. Coldest darn December I can remember. It figures.

2. I don't really have any data to compare what my swing speed was to what it is now, but I'm sure you're right. I started this project with the thought that if I can just hit drives consistently at 200 yards, I'll settle for that. My wife swears that when I'm there I'll want more, but I don't think so. Having spent much of the summer hitting no further than 175 (and rarely that), I was ecstatic when just a few changes bumped me up to some 195 yard drives.

3. I've used the PW more than any other club at the range. I have the greatest confidence in this club.

4. I do plan on getting a club fitting sometime. I looked up the best fitters in my state on Golf Digest and called them. The guy was great and spent a long time just chatting on the phone. I could tell these guys know what they're doing, and I'm definitely going to visit them. Still, the 460cc driver I bought off Ebay about a month ago with the 13 degree loft has greatly improved my morale.

5. Yeah, my 5-hybrid is really pretty cool. I just have to remember to hit it like an iron, not a wood. So many things out there to remember. The executive course I play is 1600 yards for 9 holes. Shortest hole is 127 and the longest is 292, with the majority being in the 150-165 range. Two par 4's and seven par 3's. I bogey a lot; Double bogey (or worse) maybe twice for 9 holes. Pars are rare. If I get one, I'm happy. Two is pretty cool and three is awesome. I did manage to par the two par 4's this past Saturday. Sadly, the rest of the round was pretty miserable. I attribute that to having to slack off hitting because of the cold temps.

6. That's great that your wife plays. Mine is trying to, although she's having back problems. She also can't quite get past the idea that when she's 60 yards from the hole, she might not want to reach for that driver. I'm just glad she's there, so I don't say much.

7. I've definitely decided golf is a long term thing. It's part of my 4 year plan towards retirement.

I played bass in various bands when I was in my teens and twenties, so I can relate to the guitar story.

I'm trying to decide when to get off the executive course and try a regular course. I'm getting there with the distance, which was my first concern. I didn't want to get out there on those 500-yard-plus holes and hit it 150, 150, 150, 70, and back 20 just to get on the green. Now that I know I can hit around 200 doesn't mean that I will. And hitting straight is another issue. I hit a ball 195 yards off the tee the other day and onto the green. The only problem was....it was the wrong green. I also know pace of play is a huge concern on regular courses and I know if there's a foursome waiting on me, what little consistency I have will be shot to hell. I'm thinking since I only started in May, that maybe June 2014 might be a good time to try it. Poor woman I watched on the first tee of a regulation course hit the ball 30 yards off the tee....then 30 more...then 30 more......paired with two guys she didn't know. That's my nightmare vision for myself.
post #4 of 18

Welcome to the site.  No, you haven't "maxed out" your distances, you just haven't learned to hit the ball properly yet.   I'm 55 and not much bigger than you.  Find a good teacher, get the right equipment, and have fun.  If you're in decent shape and still reasonably athletic, I'd be surprised if you weren't hitting a 7-iron close to 150 yards when all is said and done.

 

Regardless though, it's a game for the ages.  Stick around here, and have fun along the way!   :beer:

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

Dave, thanks for your comment.  The main thing that makes me think you're right is that there's some variance in the distances that I hit a given iron.  For example, I know I probably hit a 7 iron usually around 120-125, give or take.  But I know I've hit it 140 before, and that's a pretty wide variance.120 vs. 140.  The same thing holds for most of the rest of the clubs, although I'd say it's much narrower for the PW, but that's the club I've worked with the most, and it's the club I'm most comfortable with.  I do think I hit most of the clubs pretty solid and on the sweet spot when I hit my max distance.  But still, I think you may be right that there's a little more distance out there for me.  Not sure it's 150 for a 7 iron, but I hope you're right.  Thanks again.

post #6 of 18

Welcome HH. I agree with David, imho you haven't yet unlocked your true potential. getting fit for clubs and taking lessons will help with that. I'm 65, started golfing in 1991, stopped in 2003 and just started again last month. yes, I have lost some distance, but imho it's due to technique. Look at Steve Strickers short swing, he still plays on a world class level, because he adjusted his swing to suit his age and strength. 

 

Keep at it, again, welcome to TST.

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Hammer.  I'm glad to be here.  Most of my average distances right now correspond to a "short hitter" on a swing speed/distance chart.  I'm actually fine with that.  I'd like to make sure I've achieved my potential, but I don't need it to hit 300 yard drives or 100 yard pitches that land 3 feet from the flag.  I just want to have fun, hit consistently, achieve reasonable distances, and be able to fit in with the pace of play on a regulation course.

post #8 of 18
Where you go from here is (weather permitting) to a full course to play a real round. 2 pars and nothing over a double-bogey on the short course; I’d assume you’re better than a great majority of the people playing my usual course today. On that note, the thing I wish I did differently when I started out was to play more. I was self-conscious about my game, and I spent time at the range trying to work things out, but I rarely played. I didn’t really improve until I started playing a lot. Part of that is that playing is the best practice. But also, the more I played, the more I realized how bad most people were, and the more confident I got in my own abilities.

I see you worried about driving 175-200, but that’s as far as most people can drive. I can’t hit my driver over 250, I don’t hit my irons any further than you do, and shooting in the mid/high 80s makes me better than most people I play with. Similarly, on a par 5 “hit it 150, 150, 150, 70, and back 20 just to get on the green" isn’t so bad. Just sink your bogey putt, and you’ve had a decent hole. 18 bogeys is a 90 is better than 95% of people will ever shoot. Heck, fix the approach from 50, and you’re putting for par.

Anyway, I got out more by grabbing 2 of my easiest-going friends (a 3-some meant our group would move quickly, even if we were bad) and bringing a lot of the great equalizer (beer) along. But even if it's you and 3 randoms, odds are someone else will be playing your pace. Very few people are actually good at golf. And if you do end up surrounded by very good players, and you feel like you're slowing them down, the easy way to keep up is to not look for balls you hit out of bounds, but rather just drop a new ball in the fairway the same distance where the last one went out. I found that, as long as I was keeping up with the pace, I was able to have fun out there. But distance will come from confident swings, and confident swings come from playing more.

Can’t help you with aging, but if you want to keep playing through winter, move down here to Florida. Our challenge is playing in summer….
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hazard Finder, thanks for the comments.  I was definitely asking that "when am I ready for the regular course" question.  I've read some online articles about that, but it's nice to hear it from a regular golfer.  Your experiences sound a lot like mine.  I can't play as much as I wish.  This is due partly because of work, partly because of weather this time of year, and definitely because I'm nursing a golfer's elbow problem that won't quite go away.  My routine over the summer was to head to the range once a week and then to the course once on the weekend.  I was almost to the point where I was getting pretty darn consistent when the weather turned.  I'm thinking it doesn't take much time off for me to take several steps backwards, so I'm regularly looking for that clear 45 degree plus days now.  

 

I have not yet "realized how bad most people [are]."  It's not fair to look at the folks on my little executive course because I know it's a place to learn.  I've seen a few struggle on the regular course next to my driving range, but I have no idea how many are like that.  I'll defer to you on that one.  Par on my little 9 hole course is 29.  I believe my best score is around 38, but that's probably with several mulligans.  An honest best score might be 42, so I don't know that I'm quite at "2 pars and nothing over a double-bogey."  I bet I was fairly close, though, before the weather turned, especially when I was able to go hit a few practice balls before playing.  My distance had taken a quick jump for the better and I thought I knew how to improve even more, but alas....temps in the 20s and snow set in.  My "confident swings" are all taking place in my living room these days, but there looks like maybe I have a shot with the weather both Friday and Saturday this week.

 

You're right, pace of play is a real concern for me.  I read it's the number one concern of golfers in a survey at the regular public course near me.  I worry about it less on the executive course than I used to, but it's still a concern.  I absolutely never want to hold anyone up who is faster than I.  I like the advice to just put another ball down and not search for out of bounds balls (although my wife apparently lives by the rule that one should absolutely never abandon a ball because that's just "throwing money away").  

 

Anyway, thanks for the advice.  You sound like a guy who sincerely wants to help and I think pretty much everything you said was dead on.

post #10 of 18

Well, if you do end up looking for a ball OB and see there's someone waiting on the tees behind you, you can always just wave them through while you look. I wouldn't worry about how fast you play. If you're playing relatively slowly, and feel that someone behind you is faster, you can always let them play through.

post #11 of 18
Yeah, when there are things stopping you from playing regularly -- weather or injury or work or whatever -- it makes it really hard to get better. The range is a great place to work on all the swing tips you read here, help build muscle memory, etc., but there's no substitute for just getting out there and playing.

There's a lot of really bad golf being played out there. It's tough to tell on a site like this, where a bunch of excellent golfers, some of whom are instructors, come to discuss fine-tuning their obessions. But for every single-digit handicapper on my usual course today, there will be a few dozen guys who are there primarily to have some beers outside on a sunny day, who take a mulligan every other hole, and who've never come close to breaking 100 despite never recording an "honest" score in their lives. For what it's worth, I love playing with guys like that. Don't take themselves seriously, lots of fun. Anyway, if you can shoot about 120, you won't have a pace issue with most golfers.

On "2 pars and nothing over double-bogey," the impressive thing to me was nothing over double-bogey, not the pars. Getting to the point that I didn't have any "complete self-destruction" sorts of holes was a big deal for my game. It also reminded me of another pace-of-play trick: put a max score limit on yourself. My friends (many of whom will never break 100) and I will use double par as our limit -- e.g., on a par 4, after your 8th shot, pick up your ball. We mostly do that so that if someone has a "self-destruction" hole, he can just pick up and walk away before it gets to his head. But it does speed you up. If you're *really* worried about pace, you can put a double-bogey limit on yourself. You'll be on the green in time to putt for double-bogey most holes, so it's really just not finishing out your putts. And, trust me on this, nobody's going to think badly of you if you don't finish out your putts.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hazard Finder, again, I appreciate the comments.  It's likely I'm worried too much about holding other folks up, and perhaps overestimating the quality of play on the public courses.  I wish I had started playing again at least in my forties.  I wouldn't have to deal with the various aches and pains....major and minor...that I find have surfaced as a result of hitting a golf ball at the age of 58.  Part of my problem is I plan on retiring in about four years to a place that is known for very excellent golf.....i.e., Pawley's Island, SC....25 minutes south of Myrtle Beach.  There are several top 100 courses in the area, and most of the rest aren't very far behind.  It is said that 70% of the people in the area play golf.  I want to find the least popular courses where the good golfers never go.  Ask me if I were 25 and I'd say I want to compete with the best.  But ask me now at 58 and I just want a quiet, peaceful game with no pressure and the ability to make mistakes with no one breathing down my neck to "hurry up."  I honestly think I have a great chance to get out there and be quite competitive with your average golfer.  My short term problem is that the bad weather curtailed me just when I was about (I think) to graduate from quite mediocre to not half bad.  My wife says we have a five year plan until retirement.  We're in the first year.  Patience is not my middle name, but I now intellectually that she's right.  I truly love being out there.  I think I can be good.  I would love to have a friend who is good to offer on the spot advice.  I will eventually take lessons.  I could so totally get wrapped up in this game.  Wish I was 25.  Half my problems would go away.

post #13 of 18

I just joined the group and came across your thread. Although I am younger than you (44), I am a complete beginner (4 months) and share many of your thoughts, concerns, and frustarations. I thought you might be interested in hearing a fellow beginner's perspective.

 

-  Have I about max'ed out my driving distance now?

    I strongly doubt that. In all likelihood, your swing mechanics are not correct (yet). If you are using mostly arms (vs body) for sure.

 

-  What can I do to get more drives in the fairway?

    Hone in on proper swing mechanics first (instructor/lessons/video/forum..), then practice

 

-  How do you develop a consistent swing with the various aches and pains that come with being almost 60 years old?

    I am experiencing left arm tennis elbow (tendonitis). I am almost positive this is a result of poor swing technique (too much arms or all arms). In almost all likelihood some or all of what you are experiencing could be related.

 

-  What can I do to keep from losing over the Winter all that I've learned since May and then just having to re-learn it when Spring is here again?

    Practice indoors. Don't know where you live, but around me there are several indoor domes. You can also set up a net with rubber balls if you have space for it somewhere. Taking a weekend trip or two to warmer climate can be very cool too. I went to Orlando 2 weeks ago and played 3 rounds.

 

* Make sure you do some due diligence in picking proper instructor. A good instructor should be able to identify your swing issues, should be consistent in their teachings (tailored to you), and you should of course feel comfortable working with him/her (like anything in life).

 

* Golf is so hard to learn and then you have to sorta get out on the course and play with guys that have been playing for years. You have to pick up on the etiquette and pace and keep your cool all the same time. I often wonder how anyone breaks into this sport unless they are nurtured from a very young age in country club circles..Surprisingly though, I found that everyone I have been paired up with (so far) has been very nice and understanding (they had to learn at some point too). Usually I get a few tips along the way too :) Don't worry about high scores at this stage. Swallow your pride. If its taking too long to get to the greens, pick up ball and throw into fairway or skip a shot or go right to the green..Be respectful, humble, and nice and I am pretty sure you will have a positive experience as you get out there..

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by baw1 View Post
 

I just joined the group and came across your thread. Although I am younger than you (44), I am a complete beginner (4 months) and share many of your thoughts, concerns, and frustarations. I thought you might be interested in hearing a fellow beginner's perspective.

 

-  Have I about max'ed out my driving distance now?

    I strongly doubt that. In all likelihood, your swing mechanics are not correct (yet). If you are using mostly arms (vs body) for sure.

 

-  What can I do to get more drives in the fairway?

    Hone in on proper swing mechanics first (instructor/lessons/video/forum..), then practice

 

-  How do you develop a consistent swing with the various aches and pains that come with being almost 60 years old?

    I am experiencing left arm tennis elbow (tendonitis). I am almost positive this is a result of poor swing technique (too much arms or all arms). In almost all likelihood some or all of what you are experiencing could be related.

 

-  What can I do to keep from losing over the Winter all that I've learned since May and then just having to re-learn it when Spring is here again?

    Practice indoors. Don't know where you live, but around me there are several indoor domes. You can also set up a net with rubber balls if you have space for it somewhere. Taking a weekend trip or two to warmer climate can be very cool too. I went to Orlando 2 weeks ago and played 3 rounds.

 

* Make sure you do some due diligence in picking proper instructor. A good instructor should be able to identify your swing issues, should be consistent in their teachings (tailored to you), and you should of course feel comfortable working with him/her (like anything in life).

 

* Golf is so hard to learn and then you have to sorta get out on the course and play with guys that have been playing for years. You have to pick up on the etiquette and pace and keep your cool all the same time. I often wonder how anyone breaks into this sport unless they are nurtured from a very young age in country club circles..Surprisingly though, I found that everyone I have been paired up with (so far) has been very nice and understanding (they had to learn at some point too). Usually I get a few tips along the way too :) Don't worry about high scores at this stage. Swallow your pride. If its taking too long to get to the greens, pick up ball and throw into fairway or skip a shot or go right to the green..Be respectful, humble, and nice and I am pretty sure you will have a positive experience as you get out there..

 

baw1, looks like we started playing about the same time.  It's nice to know other beginners share some of my thoughts and concerns.  I think I was definitely swinging with just my arms until early December, when I started reading more about swinging with the body.  I'm confident that I'm doing a little better with that now, and my distance improved from 170 or thereabouts with a driver to almost 200.  I can tell you, though, that a 14 year age difference between you and me definitely makes a difference.  When I turned 50, my doctor looked at me and said, "Things are going to start to happen now," and he was right.  I would love to feel 44 again, although the vast majority of people I meet don't think I look 58.  One of the things that golf has taught me in the past 6 months, though, is that I am definitely that age.  I would love to play 18 holes or go to the range and get three 150 ball buckets.  Alas, the golfers elbow thing allows me only to play 9 or get a 45 bucket before it lets me know it's time to quit.  And I can only hit twice a week with it, max.  This is quite frustrating, but I look at it from the perspective that if my son in law hadn't told me about the pressure pad, I would almost definitely have had to quit long ago.  As for the indoor range, I'm in the Baltimore area and I've not been been able to find one around here.  I believe there are some around DC, but that's a three hour commitment just with the travel time (and assumes no traffic).  I feel the weather is conspiring against me, too, as I can't remember a colder December.  As for finding an instructor, that is certainly my plan....possibly as soon as Spring.  Two things about that:  1.  I'd rather take lessons at a time of year when I can go out and practice what I learn without freezing my *** off, and 2.  I'm still progressing just by reading, and I'd like to get to the point where I'm not before incurring that expense.  Thanks for the advice.  I think you are spot on with just about everything you wrote.

post #15 of 18
 
I can tell you, though, that a 14 year age difference between you and me definitely makes a difference.  When I turned 50, my doctor looked at me and said, "Things are going to start to happen now," and he was right.  I would love to feel 44 again, although the vast majority of people I meet don't think I look 58.  One of the things that golf has taught me in the past 6 months, though, is that I am definitely that age.  I would love to play 18 holes or go to the range and get three 150 ball buckets.  Alas, the golfers elbow thing allows me only to play 9 or get a 45 bucket before it lets me know it's time to quit.  And I can only hit twice a week with it, max.  This is quite frustrating, but I look at it from the perspective that if my son in law hadn't told me about the pressure pad, I would almost definitely have had to quit long ago.

        I can't put myself in your shoes (although I will be there soon enough too). One of the first rounds I ended up playing was at a private country club (through a friend of a friend). I played with 2 other guys who were 86 and 68 respectively (age not handicap). Both are great golfers and get out 3 times a week during the season. Granted they have been playing for most of their lives, I was still quite impressed at their skill and energy level.

 

As for the indoor range, I'm in the Baltimore area and I've not been been able to find one around here.  I believe there are some around DC, but that's a three hour commitment just with the travel time (and assumes no traffic).  I feel the weather is conspiring against me, too, as I can't remember a colder December. 

        I am in the Chicago area and December has indeed been brutal this year. Another thing you might try is finding a golf simualtor. Maybe through your local golf shop or clinic or instructor..

 

Thanks for the advice.  I think you are spot on with just about everything you wrote.

        Thanks for sharing your story. Often times I feel like I am the only one that's just beginning at this and everyone else has been playing forever.

post #16 of 18

I'm 63 years old. Last few years, I could play a couple of times a month. Now, I'm in a situation where I could probably play twice a week in most months. I'm looking forward to more golf.

 

I see a lot of beginners at golf clinics in my area. To get back into the game and "not be frustrated," I would suggest you get some lessons. It appears you have reached the limits of self-taught progress.

  • A good pro can take you farther in a half hour than you can take yourself with three months of trial and error.
  • Learning the driver and woods normally takes more work than the irons. A pro can speed your progress.
  • Along with full swing lessons, consider taking a short-game lesson. This can point out any glitches in close-in game. Also, there are dozens of flavors of wedges out there - a pro could help you find some that match your potential.

 

On your clubs, at least get a static fitting. This looks at matching shaft flex and swing speed, proper club length and lie angle (makes sure the club sets flat at address), and grip thickness. At this stage, you mainly want clubs that won't hurt your game.

 

Once your swing stabilizes (probably fairly quick for you if your work on the game a little), you could get a full fitting. With the data from a full fitting, you dont have to buy everything all at once. You can get the irons, then the woods, etc., as $$ becomes available.

 

If you currently work out, keep it up. If you don't, start. At a minimum, you want to work on core strength and flexibility.

 

Welcome back to Golfdom!

post #17 of 18

Are you on an exercise program? I'm 58 and although I can't bench press what I used to or run as fast or jump as high I'm still in better shape than most of the younger guys I play with. Can't tell that I've lost any distance other than the usual slumps and peaks in ball striking (which have nothing to do with age).

 

Workout routines have to change with age and recovery time becomes a much higher priority but no reason to not still maintain quite a bit of muscle and fairly low body fat at 58.

post #18 of 18

Wow. So few posts so many words. HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OLDIES WITH GOLF HOPES. 

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