or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Playing with a Scratch Golfer - thoughts?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Playing with a Scratch Golfer - thoughts? - Page 3

post #37 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by GolfGuy123 View Post

hmmm...so it sounds like im one of the only high handicappers who enjoys and sees the huge benefit in playing with a scratch / low handicap player? in my experience, my rounds with great players have been just as good if not better than taking actual lessons with a pro...and thats just by observing and maybe asking 1-2 questions after the round is over.

I may not really be a "high handicapper" but I still find it greatly beneficial to play with those who are better than me. For me it reminds me what it will take to reach my personal goal (scratch by the time I'm out of high school is what I'm shooting for) and gives me a lot of info to work on. I take statistics on my own game, but will also note the stats of my better teammates when I play with them just for the purpose of comparison. It allows me to tailor my practice in order to overcome what is a weakness for me compared to those that are what I want to be.

post #38 of 117

I played with both of the club pros at my club this past week, both play off +2, and noticed that my game is very much the same as theirs and when the round was over I was within a couple strokes of them .....on an average round ! I hit the ball just as well as both of them but where I only make 1 birdie to clean up my mistakes, they always seem to manage 3-6 birdies during a round. The birdies clean up there mistakes on a bad day and have them well under par when they are swingin it well. Like others have said, you don't really notice anything out of the ordinary, they just do everything well. I am so far from that level but I feel like I can play at that level very soon though.

post #39 of 117

I kinda liken this to playing tennis with a teaching/pro. When I was a C+ player, I had a doubles match with 2 of our local teaching pros. Serving was obviously the stroke that stood out from us non pros, but at the time, I thought my ground strokes were pretty good for my playing level, and thought I had good pace...boy was I wrong, they hit ground stokes so hard, when I went to return them the ball almost took the racket out of my hands, yet at the net, they could with such soft hands drop a volley right on my shoe laces.

 

After the first game, I studied their techniques very hard. after we got slaughtered lol I asked about a couple of things which they were more than happy to explain. so good players in some way or another imho can be a benefit to those with less skill. BTW, I began lessons with both players a week later, in 8 months I was close to being an A player, yes I worked really hard at it. 

post #40 of 117
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Righty to Lefty View Post
 

I played with both of the club pros at my club this past week, both play off +2, and noticed that my game is very much the same as theirs and when the round was over I was within a couple strokes of them .....on an average round ! I hit the ball just as well as both of them but where I only make 1 birdie to clean up my mistakes, they always seem to manage 3-6 birdies during a round. The birdies clean up there mistakes on a bad day and have them well under par when they are swingin it well. Like others have said, you don't really notice anything out of the ordinary, they just do everything well. I am so far from that level but I feel like I can play at that level very soon though.

I can see how this makes sense (being you are a low handicap player)...IMO with your handicap, you would be included in the group of players I feel like I could benefit / learn from being paired with...more so than in the group of players (like myself) who have learning to do lol

 

Guess what im trying to say is...I can see where a single digit handicap player may not necessarily see anything different or learn much from someone who is a scratch player and plays at pretty much the same level as themselves, barring a few putts here and there.

post #41 of 117
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post
 

I kinda liken this to playing tennis with a teaching/pro. When I was a C+ player, I had a doubles match with 2 of our local teaching pros. Serving was obviously the stroke that stood out from us non pros, but at the time, I thought my ground strokes were pretty good for my playing level, and thought I had good pace...boy was I wrong, they hit ground stokes so hard, when I went to return them the ball almost took the racket out of my hands, yet at the net, they could with such soft hands drop a volley right on my shoe laces.

 

After the first game, I studied their techniques very hard. after we got slaughtered lol I asked about a couple of things which they were more than happy to explain. so good players in some way or another imho can be a benefit to those with less skill. BTW, I began lessons with both players a week later, in 8 months I was close to being an A player, yes I worked really hard at it. 

this is EXACTLY what I mean! Understood you are talking about Tennis...but same concept I am trying to point out.

post #42 of 117

Always good playing with advanced players. A lot of it just depends on how close of buddies you are. Is he a friend or acquaintance? Buddy is a broad term. When I've played with better friends, I don't worry about all this extraneous crap people are bringing up. I'll ask questions if there is something I want to know from him and gladly listen if he offers anything unsolicited. At the same time I will promptly give a scratch golfer friend crap on bad shots and expect to get it in return on mine.

 

Huge difference on playing with acquaintance scratch golfer vs. friend scratch golfer...

post #43 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by GolfGuy123 View Post
 

I can see how this makes sense (being you are a low handicap player)...IMO with your handicap, you would be included in the group of players I feel like I could benefit / learn from being paired with...more so than in the group of players (like myself) who have learning to do lol

 

Guess what im trying to say is...I can see where a single digit handicap player may not necessarily see anything different or learn much from someone who is a scratch player and plays at pretty much the same level as themselves, barring a few putts here and there.

You have remember that I played with both of them when they shot what they would consider a terrible round (3-5 over par) and I played what I would consider an above average round (4-6 overpar) so it looked like I could hang with them on that day even though one of them had shot 5 under and the other one had shot 7 under on the course.

 

I learn a tremendous amount from them and what amazes me is that they make a lot of the same mistakes that I make but their good is really good and they don't really hit a lot of loose shots. The mental strength and the ability to make putts is very obvious as it seems like every putt is going to go in and their distance control is absurdly good. I really enjoy playing with them as I learn about all of the aspects that make them so good. I wish I could play with them more than once per week but that is way more than most get to experience. I think it is important because initially I would press a lil bit when I played with them but now I am completely relaxed and really enjoy the rounds.

post #44 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Be a little (or a lot) more hesitant to say "good shot" than you normally would. Sometimes poorer players will say "good shot" when I thin a wedge that hits into a tier and happens to grab and wind up close, but it was a lucky shot, not a good shot. I've learned to not let it bug me, but it used to, and I know some good players who get quite irked by that kind of stuff.

 

Look at his reaction and if he seems pleased, offer up a nice quiet "shot" (usually people don't say "good" at the better player level :D). Don't go over the top, just a restrained "shot" will be good.

I second that.......... LOL

post #45 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleEagle View Post
 

Being a higher handicapper, I really hate it when I show up as a single and get put into a group teeing off.  I usually ask if they are very good, if they are playing for money (I do not play for money), and how they feel about an "outsider" joining their  threesome.  Sometimes after the front nine, I just head for the parking lot....

 

I am very uncomfortable playing with much better golfers...I have this fear that I will bring them down to my level after about 4 holes.  

Wow.....what a sorry attitude.  You expect NOT to get paired as a single?  Pairing on a golf course is a normal every day occurrence.  The skill level or whether not the group you are paired with is betting is irrelevant.  Show a little social grace and enjoy the day for Gods sake.   Introduce yourself confidently with a smile and a firm handshake, and make no excuses for yourself.  This is the best approach.........

 

My 2 cents...

post #46 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckeyeNut View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleEagle View Post
 

Being a higher handicapper, I really hate it when I show up as a single and get put into a group teeing off.  I usually ask if they are very good, if they are playing for money (I do not play for money), and how they feel about an "outsider" joining their  threesome.  Sometimes after the front nine, I just head for the parking lot....

 

I am very uncomfortable playing with much better golfers...I have this fear that I will bring them down to my level after about 4 holes.  

Wow.....what a sorry attitude.  You expect NOT to get paired as a single?  Pairing on a golf course is a normal every day occurrence.  The skill level or whether not the group you are paired with is betting is irrelevant.  Show a little social grace and enjoy the day for Gods sake.   Introduce yourself confidently with a smile and a firm handshake, and make no excuses for yourself.  This is the best approach.........

 

My 2 cents...


Yeah @DoubleEagle, how dare you want to play golf with people at a level where you're comfortable? You should be forced to pair up and go out with players you're not comfortable with and hate every round you play for the benefit of others. :roll:

post #47 of 117

Golf is a social game, so  I suppose some people would be better served if they used their free time playing solitaire.  LOL

 

 

With that said, if you do decide to "brave it" on a golf course with strangers(ee gadzz), don't make apologetic sad-sack excuses for your game.  Nobody cares or wants to hear it because it serves no purpose.  Just be yourself and have fun.   Nobody cares...

 

A whiny apologetic introduction sets a bad tone for the beginning of any round. 

post #48 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckeyeNut View Post
 

Golf is a social game.  I suppose some people would be better served if they stuck to spending their free time playing solitaire.  LOL


Golf *can* be a social game, not *is* a social game.

There are people who meet up for a laugh and a chat and a catchup and happen to whack a ball around while they're doing it.

There are others who enjoy the game itself but don't like people, are introverted, shy, have Asberger's Syndrome, social anxiety or whatever else and they play at the quietest times known to man to avoid idiots telling them they *have* to be paired up through some bizarre "social grace" and spend the next 3.5 hours feeling uncomfortable in every way possible to the point of feigning injury just to get the hell away from the situation forced onto them.

post #49 of 117

I can hear the Starter now calling out over the PA..........

 

 

Will the Waddams single please report to the first tee!  You will be joining the Miller 3-some. 

:-OOh no...may I bring my stapler as a comfort item?

post #50 of 117

Back to OT folks ... I never knew if I ever played with one b/c I tend to focus on my game when I am playing golf.   I am not good at watching how others are doing.   But in the future, if someone is playing like a pro, I will ask if he is a scratch golfer and write down my thoughts on how it was to play with one ;-).    Knowing myself, I don't think it will matter to me one way or another.   Now, if I am playing with Gulbis (I am pretty sure she can scratch ;-)), I think it will hugely effect my game.   My thoughts will wonder, and I will be lucky if I can break 100.  

post #51 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckeyeNut View Post
 

I can hear the Starter now calling out over the PA..........

 

 

Will the Waddams single please report to the first tee!  You will be joining the Miller 3-some. 

:-OOh no..what shall I do? 


To basically belittle someone because they're not comfortable being paired up with a certain standard of player and then to completely ignore an explanation as to why that might be the case and in fact mock and stereotype people who may well have a medical condition which prevents them from being able to "fit in" to your golf grace suggests you are either:

1. Completely ignorant.
2. A ****.
3. Both.

Whatever the case I'll let you get on with it because frankly people like you are exactly the reason I avoid being paired.

post #52 of 117
Wow, this thread just took a hard right turn into the "sucky zone".
post #53 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiniBlueDragon View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckeyeNut View Post
 

Golf is a social game.  I suppose some people would be better served if they stuck to spending their free time playing solitaire.  LOL


Golf *can* be a social game, not *is* a social game.

There are people who meet up for a laugh and a chat and a catchup and happen to whack a ball around while they're doing it.

There are others who enjoy the game itself but don't like people, are introverted, shy, have Asberger's Syndrome, social anxiety or whatever else and they play at the quietest times known to man to avoid idiots telling them they *have* to be paired up through some bizarre "social grace" and spend the next 3.5 hours feeling uncomfortable in every way possible to the point of feigning injury just to get the hell away from the situation forced onto them.

 

It has nothing to do with social graces, bizarre or otherwise. Courses group people together simply because they're throwing money away if they don't.  If the course is slow that day and an introvert asks to go out on their own, the course will probably let them.  Otherwise, it's silly to expect a busy course to give a single a block all to himself when there are paying customers they could put with the single. If the single doesn't like it he can comeback when it's not so busy.

post #54 of 117

I have no patience for whiny apologetic golfers or people in general.   With that said, I am also making a valid point.    I don't care how good or bad a person plays golf.  Just be positive, make no excuses, and introduce yourself.... if you are an introvert and don't talk much...FINE.   All is good!  Simply introduce yourself, and play.  

 

Please don't make an introduction into a huge spilling of insecurities because this sets a negative tone and looks bad.  This is good advice for insecure folks. This is not a first impression one wants to make. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Golf Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Playing with a Scratch Golfer - thoughts?