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Callaway Introduces 3 New Tour Balls - Differences Based on Clubhead Speed

post #1 of 54
Thread Starter 

Speed Regime Tour Balls

 

All have urethane covers and it looks like 5 layers.

 

1 - under 90 mph

 

2 - 90-105

 

3 - 105+

 

Aerodynamics fit to each swing speed for more distance

 

Find it here:

 

http://www.callawaygolf.com/more/speed-regime-golf-balls/?mcid1=115

 

See it here with the always entertaining Harry Arnett of Callaway:

 

 

post #2 of 54

These are their Tour balls, too. Interesting.

post #3 of 54
These balls outshine the Titliest Pro V1 by leaps and bounds IMO
post #4 of 54

Not entirely sure how older players, or not that good of players would feel about having to pay $47 dollars a dozen for a ball designed for them. I am wondering if they are trying to get more players to play a premium golf ball, but I think S1 wont sell well. A lot of high handicappers who don't have the swing speed, wont bother buying a premium golf ball. 

post #5 of 54
I agree about the SR1's probably not selling well, but for those who do spend the $$$ for balls, the SR3's are the best I have ever played.
post #6 of 54
I got 2 two valley sample sleeves from Dick's a few weeks ago and have played several rounds with them.....I got the SR2..... Good distance off the drive, nice soft landing on the greens.

If I did not already have a sh$@ load of golf balls waiting to be used, I might switch and buy some.
post #7 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefinetheMoment View Post

I agree about the SR1's probably not selling well, but for those who do spend the $$$ for balls, the SR3's are the best I have ever played.

I don't know how they do it, but I found 2 dz SR 1 on ebay for $65... and they were authentic - compared them to the ones I purchased from a dealer - the appearance was the same. I've also found them on sale for $40.

 

I agree that the SR1 may not sell briskly, but experienced players with slower speeds, if you can get them away from playing ProV1s, would be the market. Nonetheless, I've found the SR1 to spin well around the greens. It's my gamer this year although my SS is about 90+.

post #8 of 54
Wow that's a great price for 2 dozen!!
I agree the spin rate is really great (I've only tried the SR3's) around the green and also for my iron shots. I was stopping my 6 & 5 irons stiff, so the ball gave me lots of confidence, especially from 200 yds!!
post #9 of 54

I've been trying out the Callaway Supersofts. A small-college golfer who works for Golf Galaxy plays them and recommended them to me. (At $20 a dozen, a bit cheaper than S1-S3).

 

Supersofts have an excellent, smooth release on chip and run shots, roll well on putts, and get good checkspin on iron shots. Only drawback so far: Short, greenside pitch shots don't get much checkspin, and tend to run out quite a bit.  I need to hit a half wedge or a sand wedge to get much bite from them up close.

post #10 of 54

Nothing irritates me more than marketing aimed at one specific aspect of golf ball use.

So you take your 105mph ball - how many times during a round of golf will that ball be struck at 105 mph? Maybe 10? The rest of time it will be used at less than this speed for irons, wedge shots, chips and putts - all which arguably contribute more to scoring which is what a ball is all about. So in reality, the marketing aimed at matching the golf ball to your swing speed is largely irrelevant. Nice one Callaway - you really thought that one out.

post #11 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefinetheMoment View Post

These balls outshine the Titliest Pro V1 by leaps and bounds IMO

How?

post #12 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nemicu View Post
 

Nothing irritates me more than marketing aimed at one specific aspect of golf ball use.

So you take your 105mph ball - how many times during a round of golf will that ball be struck at 105 mph? Maybe 10? The rest of time it will be used at less than this speed for irons, wedge shots, chips and putts - all which arguably contribute more to scoring which is what a ball is all about. So in reality, the marketing aimed at matching the golf ball to your swing speed is largely irrelevant. Nice one Callaway - you really thought that one out.

Don't think you thought it out...

post #13 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post
 

Don't think you thought it out...

 

Bingo.

 

The balls perform at all the levels, they're just built so that people with 105 MPH driver clubhead speeds (and the equivalent 8-iron clubhead speed) should choose the "105 MPH ball."

post #14 of 54
Kind of a lame name for a tour-level ball if you ask me. I like the three swing speed levels though.
post #15 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post
 

Don't think you thought it out...

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Bingo.

 

The balls perform at all the levels, they're just built so that people with 105 MPH driver clubhead speeds (and the equivalent 8-iron clubhead speed) should choose the "105 MPH ball."

Really? Would you care to explain how a ball allegedly optimised to 15% of your game works? 

I get how multi layer balls work for a variety of swing speeds - that is the intended purpose - but saying that a ball, or any ball, is optimised for a specific swing speed (and no, there isn't a equivalent iron swing speed) is plain wrong. Kind of dumb, especially when you consider one of their previous marketing lines was: "you can't argue with physics". It seems like Callaway has clearly defied the laws of physics - or defied the laws of golf. You can't change your ball mid hole to suit the swing speed that will be applied - let alone the trajectory, spin, shape and last but not least - the distance that may or may not be required. Like I said, nice try Callaway, but nothing other than "gimmick" passes this golfers BS radar.

post #16 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nemicu View Post


Really? Would you care to explain how a ball allegedly optimised to 15% of your game works? 
I get how multi layer balls work for a variety of swing speeds - that is the intended purpose - but saying that a ball, or any ball, is optimised for a specific swing speed (and no, there isn't a equivalent iron swing speed) is plain wrong. Kind of dumb, especially when you consider one of their previous marketing lines was: "you can't argue with physics". It seems like Callaway has clearly defied the laws of physics - or defied the laws of golf. You can't change your ball mid hole to suit the swing speed that will be applied - let alone the trajectory, spin, shape and last but not least - the distance that may or may not be required. Like I said, nice try Callaway, but nothing other than "gimmick" passes this golfers BS radar.
Um, I'm thinking you haven't realized yet that people who swing faster with a driver also swing faster with an iron than those who swing slower. There IS a difference in the 8-iron swing speeds of the golfer who has a driver SS of 110 and the one with a driver SS of 90.

Think of it this way: golfer one swings his driver at 110 mph and his 8-iron at 75 mph (pulled out of my rear, not actual numbers but should be almost close). Golfer 2 swings his driver at 85 mph and his 5-wood at 75 mph. Golfer 1 wants more spin when he swings at 75 mph (using an 8-iron) because he's using a short iron that needs to stay where it lands. Golfer 2 might want less spin from a 75 mph swing because he's hitting a 5-wood and wants a high launch with low spin for more distance. In this situation, the same ball will not work optimally for both golfers. If the ball spins a lot with a 75 mph SS, golfer 1 will be happy, if it doesn't spin much at 75 mph golfer 2 will be happy, if it has medium spin then they both will find a different ball to play.

They use the driver swing speed to estimate what your swing speed with other clubs is. That way they can make sure you get more spin as you transition into hitting short irons without having it start spinning more too early or too late. The S1 will start spinning with too low of a swing speed for an individual with a high driver swing speed since they'll only benefit once they start hitting wedges or half wedges. If a golfer with a slow swing speed plays the S3, then they will have higher spin on their tee shots than would provide optimal distance (and LSW explains why that's bad). It's all about scaling the spinrate with varying swing speeds with different balls.
post #17 of 54

So by definition, a golf ball that is -quote- "optimised for a 105 mph driver" is not also optimised for an 8-iron for 75mph? It's impossible to have one optimised over the other because the launch characteristics (not least the actual ball speed) are completely different - speed, launch angle, spin rate - these are the 3 fundamentals of ball distance. A golf ball hit with a driver does not have the same effect as that hit with an 8-iron - therefore it cannot be optimised for both. If you choose a ball that has been allegedly optimised for the driver at 105mph, it cannot transfer that quality to a ball hit at 75mph with a different loft and spin rate - that is a physical fact.

Numerous balls have been tested over the years with both robotic machines and more importantly human testers. Not one ball has ever been optimised for any one individual for a variety of shots. If distance were indeed the primary goal, we would all be using rock hard distance balls with little spin - which of course we don't.

Coupled with this, every ball within the market leaders range achieves a peak distance hit under optimal conditions of around 4 yards of each other - hardly enough to make much of a difference to anyone, let alone a touring pro. What the touring pro is actually looking for is a ball capable of being controlled with good spin and feel on ALL shots. 

And lastly, if you took Callaways 90 mph ball and hit it with a 105mph swing it travels a total distance of within 2-3 yards of the correctly "optimised" ball other under test conditions (yes we have performed those tests) which begs the question: how are they optimised for swing speed again? 

If you need any further proof, you have to ask yourself why the market leading ball (for some years now) has never found the need to be optimised for one player or swing speed over another, simply because that is not possible and furthermore there is no need. 

post #18 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nemicu View Post

So by definition, a golf ball that is -quote- "optimised for a 105 mph driver" is not also optimised for an 8-iron for 75mph? It's impossible to have one optimised over the other because the launch characteristics (not least the actual ball speed) are completely different - speed, launch angle, spin rate - these are the 3 fundamentals of ball distance. A golf ball hit with a driver does not have the same effect as that hit with an 8-iron - therefore it cannot be optimised for both. If you choose a ball that has been allegedly optimised for the driver at 105mph, it cannot transfer that quality to a ball hit at 75mph with a different loft and spin rate - that is a physical fact.
Numerous balls have been tested over the years with both robotic machines and more importantly human testers. Not one ball has ever been optimised for any one individual for a variety of shots. If distance were indeed the primary goal, we would all be using rock hard distance balls with little spin - which of course we don't.
Coupled with this, every ball within the market leaders range achieves a peak distance hit under optimal conditions of around 4 yards of each other - hardly enough to make much of a difference to anyone, let alone a touring pro. What the touring pro is actually looking for is a ball capable of being controlled with good spin and feel on ALL shots. 
And lastly, if you took Callaways 90 mph ball and hit it with a 105mph swing it travels a total distance of within 2-3 yards of the correctly "optimised" ball other under test conditions (yes we have performed those tests) which begs the question: how are they optimised for swing speed again? 
If you need any further proof, you have to ask yourself why the market leading ball (for some years now) has never found the need to be optimised for one player or swing speed over another, simply because that is not possible and furthermore there is no need. 
You don't understand: the ball is not optimized for your tee shots alone.
It is optimized for someone who swings a driver that fast because they will swing their other clubs at certain speeds. This lets them create a ball that performs the best overall versus on a single shot. If you wanted a ball that was optimized for your tee shot, you'd buy a Pinnacle Gold. The ball is designed such that it's overall characteristics will perform best for the swingspeed profile of someone whose driver swings at 110 mph. It's an overall optimization, only trading off performance with one club if it increases performance in a different area even more.

As for the distance of most golf balls being the same, this is because they all reach the "no-no" line (distance limit when hit by iron Byron) that the USGA set. It's just a matter of reaching the "no-no" line while performing better than the other golf balls on other shots. For example, which ball can spin less off the tee (usually achieved with a hard core in the ball) and more around the green (usually achieved with a softer cover and outer layer) while still reaching that limit of how far balls are allowed to travel.

I personally use the "market leading ball" you mentioned (a ProV1) and don't plan on switching unless I find something that performs better for me, but I can understand the reasoning behind creating a ball for different swing speeds. It's because you want a ball that spins a bit less at the same swing speed for those with a lower swing speed since they're hitting a longer iron than the person who swings faster with each club. It just lets people who swing slower get relatively similar numbers for spin from each club compared to those who swing faster.
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