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Wrist pain/considering cortisone injection

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Back of left wrist gets swollen and if I happen to thin a shot and release the club faster than normal then it's very painful, just took 3 days off to rest it but 5 holes in the pain returns and practice is just making this worse. Should I get a cortisone injection and how soon does it work and what should I expect, I'm 48 years old in reasonable shape but have beat myself up over the years working in heavy industrial jobs for the past 20 years I know the toll has caught up. Also should I consider going graphite, I played boron graphite Wilson staff goosenecks from 1990 to 2007 and then tried some Adams a4's with graphite also but got frustrated with my swing and got cb2's instead with KBS tour 90's, now I'm swinging better again but think going back to graphite will be no big deal since I'm used to it in irons (stiff shafts though 98-102 driver speed). But I'm really most concerned over this wrist pain I really need to get it fixed once and for all.

post #2 of 14

From what I've been told by doctors, cortisone isn't all that effective in the wrist.

 

Do you even know what's wrong with it? Get an MRI and X-ray. 

 

In the meantime, I'd put it in a wrist brace 24-7 so it can't flex. That definitely accelerates healing. If the injury is fresh, ice is huge. Also, anti-inflammatories also can help. 

 

 

But see a doctor and get that MRI. The wrist has a lot of components in it, and it's nearly impossible to diagnose with the naked eye. 

post #3 of 14

I had cort shots in my back a long time ago, it's only a temporary fix. Like JetFan said, go see a Doctor so you can find out the cause of the pain. Good luck.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Yes I started icing it as soon as I got home and switched with heat, back and forth for a while now, going to try some aleeve and call doc after holidays.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post
 

Yes I started icing it as soon as I got home and switched with heat, back and forth for a while now, going to try some aleeve and call doc after holidays.

Keep it up.  Ice is your best friend.  You can also spot ice the affected area.  Take small paper cups and freeze water in them.  Peel back the top area to expose the ice while leaving the bottom of the cup in place.  Rub the wrist with a gentle massage motion for about 5 minutes.  You get more effective icing this way than leaving ice on for 15 minutes in a  wrap.

 

If you can bring ice with you in a cooler to a range session or workout, you can spot ice right after you are done, which is the best time.  Keep up ice only until the Doctor or PT tells you to cycle with heat.  Cycling ice.heat is more often used for muscle injuries like shin splints.

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post

 
Yes I started icing it as soon as I got home and switched with heat, back and forth for a while now, going to try some aleeve and call doc after holidays.
Keep it up.  Ice is your best friend.  You can also spot ice the affected area.  Take small paper cups and freeze water in them.  Peel back the top area to expose the ice while leaving the bottom of the cup in place.  Rub the wrist with a gentle massage motion for about 5 minutes.  You get more effective icing this way than leaving ice on for 15 minutes in a  wrap.

If you can bring ice with you in a cooler to a range session or workout, you can spot ice right after you are done, which is the best time.  Keep up ice only until the Doctor or PT tells you to cycle with heat.  Cycling ice.heat is more often used for muscle injuries like shin splints.

This is exactly what they did for me when I ran track, and got shin splints. However, I thought shin splints were actually bone injuries. At least that's how i remembered how the coach explained it to me.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


This is exactly what they did for me when I ran track, and got shin splints. However, I thought shin splints were actually bone injuries. At least that's how i remembered how the coach explained it to me.

Shin splits pain can be from a variety of causes one of which is the tibialis anterior muscle sheath pulling away from the tibia itself.  Your wrist pain could be bone or tendon related.  Either way, ice is a great pain killer and anti-inflammatory.  Best of luck.

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Going to go play today, took Aleeve a little while ago and I'm going to ice down the wrist a little before I go out. I think I'm thinking of wrapping it also before I play it sometimes helps prevent the hyperextending on thin shots.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post
 

Going to go play today, took Aleeve a little while ago and I'm going to ice down the wrist a little before I go out. I think I'm thinking of wrapping it also before I play it sometimes helps prevent the hyperextending on thin shots.

 

Athletes use heat before training to loosen up the trouble site. Or if an athlete has some chronic issue during a game and needs some relief, he'll use heat before heading back in. He'll use ice if he plans on shutting it down for the day. 

 

You use ice after activities. Not before. 

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JetFan1983 View Post
 

 

Athletes use heat before training to loosen up the trouble site. Or if an athlete has some chronic issue during a game and needs some relief, he'll use heat before heading back in. He'll use ice if he plans on shutting it down for the day. 

 

You use ice after activities. Not before. 

Oops, well it was a while before I actually started playing, shot 76 and really paid close attention to tempo and that helps contact tremendously, wore a wrist brace which probably helped keep the area warm, no pain right now.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JetFan1983 View Post
 

 

Athletes use heat before training to loosen up the trouble site. Or if an athlete has some chronic issue during a game and needs some relief, he'll use heat before heading back in. He'll use ice if he plans on shutting it down for the day. 

 

You use ice after activities. Not before. 

Oops, well it was a while before I actually started playing, shot 76 and really paid close attention to tempo and that helps contact tremendously, wore a wrist brace which probably helped keep the area warm, no pain right now.

 

Oh, you took some time beforehand... that might be okay, but I'm not sure. Sounds like you're okay though. :beer:

post #12 of 14

@flopster ,

 

Keep up the icing even if it doesn't hurt.  The wrist is still healing and you may have minor inflammation that doesn't cause pain.  It may take a month or two to fully heal.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post
 

@flopster ,

 

Keep up the icing even if it doesn't hurt.  The wrist is still healing and you may have minor inflammation that doesn't cause pain.  It may take a month or two to fully heal.


Will do thanks

post #14 of 14

Cold therapy is always best, especially after any kind activity that will cause you to strain your wrist. Cold will bring down the inflammation and help ease the pain. Please be careful with ice though. Never put something from the freezer directly on your skin, and try to limit treatment time to 20 minutes on, 20 minutes off. There is a wrist wrap called BFST (blood flow stimulation therapy), and it promotes blood flow to the injured area, bringing nutrients and added elasticity with it.....helping it heal. It is good to do this kind of think before a game...it gets your circulation going and will prevent further damage.

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