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True distance vs imaginary distance.

post #1 of 132
Thread Starter 
This is not meant to be negative but for everyone who crushes the ball a slice of humble pie may be waiting for you at googlemaps. Just use the measurement device and find your regular course measure your appx spot fom tee to end point. I just had a humbling experience. Thought my blast were around 275-280 more like 260-270. Normal landing spots for me were 230 with 3 wood and 240-250 with driver. This is all after roll out. Still pleased with the conclusions and now don't sound like an idiot claiming 270-300.
post #2 of 132

Good idea, going on google map just proved my distances were pretty accurate I had 250-270, I know some by no fault and others who know better but think impressing people on the internet counts, and then there are some who I have seen their swing and could definitely see that yardage as possible, the delusional ones will never give in no matter how much facts are shown to them.

post #3 of 132

Yep. It's really amazing at our course how many people play it for the first time that think they should be able to drive the 5th green that simply can't (and it's only 285 yards with the tees in the back of the tee box).

 

There is an uphill slope in front of the green so there is little or no roll or even bounce but the tee is also above the lowest point in the middle of the fairway so the overall carry is not very much uphill. Yet it really takes a pretty good poke to get there and most can't do it.

 

The 9th hole has a pond at the end of the fairway at 300 yards and hitting the ball in that pond is not as hard as driving the number 5 green. The difference is that it's downhill and the ground is more firm so there is a lot more bounce and rollout.

 

I don't pay much attention to total distance because it varies way too much from course to course and even hole to hole. Carry distance is what almost everybody overestimates by quite a bit.

post #4 of 132

That's one of things I want to do with my new rangefinder. Tee off right next to the ballwasher with three shots, and then walk down the fairway and shoot back to the ballwasher. Average the three to get an idea of drive distance.

 

On some of the tees - especially ones where there's six different grass patches - a metal plate marks how far it is to the center of the green. Using this plate and the 150-yard stake in the middle of the fairway, you can get a pretty good idea of how far your drives go.

 

This a good thing to do in April. Once you get to hot days in late June, some of holes give you an awful lot of rollout when you hit the fairway.

post #5 of 132

Google maps is pretty accurate. They even manage to keep the accuracy even in perspective view.

post #6 of 132

I just went and checked it out.   I was right about where I believed I was as far as average (~250yds).  But I have never considered myself to be a long hitter...

post #7 of 132
With the technology today, surprised you have to get home to be humiliated. Any of the GPS yardage devices will measure drive distance to show your true numbers. You don't have to believe at the time or spout to your buddies about how you "crushed that one.... 240?!!!". AND it's probably a LOT more accurate that the Google Earth method of dragging a pointer.
post #8 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayG View Post

With the technology today, surprised you have to get home to be humiliated. Any of the GPS yardage devices will measure drive distance to show your true numbers. You don't have to believe at the time or spout to your buddies about how you "crushed that one.... 240?!!!". AND it's probably a LOT more accurate that the Google Earth method of dragging a pointer.

Could be, but when I measured all of the holes on our course on Google Earth there were virtually no differences from what I already knew from my GPS.

 

The only thing I would have to keep in mind using Google Earth was that measuring from a tee box there could be 10 yards difference from the front to the back of a tee. Of course with GPS tee placement doesn't matter.

post #9 of 132

It really is amazing what some people claim without ever measuring their drive distance. It's not that hard to get an idea, and you don't even need a rangefinder/any type of technology. Just use the scorecard and subtract your approximate distance to the green. That should get you pretty close and takes like 2 seconds.

 

I always claim to hit the ball about 260 on a normal drive, maybe getting 270 if I pure it. I knew this was accurate (both scorecard method and rangefinder) but just to test googlemaps accuracy I tried their tool as well. On the flattest par 5 at my home course I picked my usual drive spot and got 262, so I'd say it's very accurate. I tested it on a par 5 where the landing zone is a sizeable downhill slope and got 278, which is also pretty accurate.

 

It is rare for a non-pro to be able to hit the ball 280+ on a flat fairway. I know a couple people that can do it, but I know a whole lot more who claim they can do it. I find it funny when people ask me how far I drive the ball and I say 260, and they claim something like 280, but when we play together we drive it the same distance. After about 4 or 5 holes they say "You hit the ball farther than 260" and I just say "No I don't."

post #10 of 132
It does make sense to use GPS to see how much farther you need to go. As for accuracy, sometimes the rangefinder measures the wrong thing. GPS could also have up to 15 yards error.

I'm not endorsing Google map labs, but it's pretty accurate.

In any case, I use it to map out the courses and the distances before a round if I've never been there before. I wish it could show 3D more accurately.
post #11 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

It does make sense to use GPS to see how much farther you need to go. As for accuracy, sometimes the rangefinder measures the wrong thing. GPS could also have up to 15 yards error.

I'm not endorsing Google map labs, but it's pretty accurate.

In any case, I use it to map out the courses and the distances before a round if I've never been there before. I wish it could show 3D more accurately.

People say that a lot (and I'm not saying they are wrong) but I've been using GPS for a long time and have never seen a single time where there was any evidence it was wrong, give or take pin placements.

 

More times than not my playing partner has a range finder and it's just a habit for me to look down at my GPS after he shoots his yardage and I do the math for the pin placement (which I know because I set them). It always matches the range finder except for the times he is way off and is picking up something besides the pin. Then I tell him he might ought to try that again.

post #12 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

It does make sense to use GPS to see how much farther you need to go. As for accuracy, sometimes the rangefinder measures the wrong thing. GPS could also have up to 15 yards error.

I'm not endorsing Google map labs, but it's pretty accurate.

In any case, I use it to map out the courses and the distances before a round if I've never been there before. I wish it could show 3D more accurately.

People say that a lot (and I'm not saying they are wrong) but I've been using GPS for a long time and have never seen a single time where there was any evidence it was wrong, give or take pin placements.

 

More times than not my playing partner has a range finder and it's just a habit for me to look down at my GPS after he shoots his yardage and I do the math for the pin placement (which I know because I set them). It always matches the range finder except for the times he is way off and is picking up something besides the pin. Then I tell him he might ought to try that again.

 

Very possible that they are more accurate. I am an engineer, but I have not worked with GPS for a long time. According to the GPS specifications for the commercial band http://www.gps.gov/technical/ps/2008-SPS-performance-standard.pdf : Page 22. This is where most people get their accuracy information.

 

However, many companies are using time delay measurements to enhance the native accuracy. I just didn't know that it would work under all conditions.

post #13 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

It does make sense to use GPS to see how much farther you need to go. As for accuracy, sometimes the rangefinder measures the wrong thing. GPS could also have up to 15 yards error.

I'm not endorsing Google map labs, but it's pretty accurate.

In any case, I use it to map out the courses and the distances before a round if I've never been there before. I wish it could show 3D more accurately.

 

While this is true, if you use one for more than a couple rounds, incorrect distances are pretty rare.  Normally, you have a decent idea of what a distance is already - like say you are shooting backwards from your ball to the ball washer to measure your drive distance.  You already have a ballpark - let's say 250.  Most often, you are going to get a good distance right out of the gate.  But if not, the next shootable thing behind the ballwasher is often 50 or more yards Farther away.  So if it is over 300, you know you missed it.  Just shoot it 2-3 times real quick and you're good.  I can't imagine trying measure driving distances during a round and going home thinking, "I've got some numbers, but I just don't know if I should trust them."

post #14 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddog10 View Post

It really is amazing what some people claim without ever measuring their drive distance. It's not that hard to get an idea, and you don't even need a rangefinder/any type of technology. Just use the scorecard and subtract your approximate distance to the green. That should get you pretty close and takes like 2 seconds.

That is fine IF the yardage on the scorecard is from where you played the tee shot. As an example, you might be playing from the whites listing a hole at 350. Well you get out there and find you're 75 yards from the green center. Well then, you hit it 275! crushed it... except that day all the tees were up at least one box, possible 2 meaning a possible 40 yd error. so that 275 suddenly turns into a 235 "crushed drive". Not exactly bragging material, right? Yes, that's an extreme case, but not out of the realm of possibility on some courses these days with 6 or 7 different teeing areas available. I would never use distance from the green to figure out drive distance unless I knew where I was hitting from relative to the actual marker.
post #15 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

It does make sense to use GPS to see how much farther you need to go. As for accuracy, sometimes the rangefinder measures the wrong thing. GPS could also have up to 15 yards error.

I'm not endorsing Google map labs, but it's pretty accurate.

In any case, I use it to map out the courses and the distances before a round if I've never been there before. I wish it could show 3D more accurately.

 

While this is true, if you use one for more than a couple rounds, incorrect distances are pretty rare.  Normally, you have a decent idea of what a distance is already - like say you are shooting backwards from your ball to the ball washer to measure your drive distance.  You already have a ballpark - let's say 250.  Most often, you are going to get a good distance right out of the gate.  But if not, the next shootable thing behind the ballwasher is often 50 or more yards Farther away.  So if it is over 300, you know you missed it.  Just shoot it 2-3 times real quick and you're good.  I can't imagine trying measure driving distances during a round and going home thinking, "I've got some numbers, but I just don't know if I should trust them."

 

Sure, I agree that for the application you mentioned it could be pretty accurate. Especially with multiple measurements like you described.

 

I'm not actually sure what my drive distances are at the moment, but if I do bring a rangefinder it would be to try to measure the pin from my current position. A little off topic, but that was more or less where my comment was directed.

post #16 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayG View Post


That is fine IF the yardage on the scorecard is from where you played the tee shot. As an example, you might be playing from the whites listing a hole at 350. Well you get out there and find you're 75 yards from the green center. Well then, you hit it 275! crushed it... except that day all the tees were up at least one box, possible 2 meaning a possible 40 yd error. so that 275 suddenly turns into a 235 "crushed drive". Not exactly bragging material, right? Yes, that's an extreme case, but not out of the realm of possibility on some courses these days with 6 or 7 different teeing areas available. I would never use distance from the green to figure out drive distance unless I knew where I was hitting from relative to the actual marker.

 

Right, I agree. I'm making the assumption though that the golfer knows where the tees should be at his home course and accounts for that when teeing off. For example, I wouldn't happen to take my distance measurement on a day that I know the tees are moved forward (or back). I obviously wouldn't advise taking your distance measurement on a foreign course if you don't know where the tees are supposed to be located... I'm not saying this is the most accurate way of measuring because there will always be error, but if you don't have access to a gps or rangefinder then it's a good ballpark method. It's often enough to open people's eyes to the fact that they may not hit it quite as far as they think.

post #17 of 132

Been there, done that. The USGA plaques, the cart gps, my gps and google all reveal the same result within a yard or so. I have no problem with the accuracy of my distance because it varies greatly. I track stats but not clubs other than drives. And only that so I can see how it relates to my FIR, GIR and scoring average. Typically a bad drive is a bad miss and it's rare I save par so I look back to see if it's the same holes that cause me problems, I've learned it's better to play safe on certain holes. That said I averaged a meager 258 through 2013 from the tee. But that includes everything, the blown drives etc. My longest drives were the longest I saw from anyone all year and my worst were pathetic. I don't obsess about it. The score is all I care about.

 

But yeah I agree too many are oblivious and I wish they weren't. Probably contributes to slow play, actually I know it does. I tire of waiting for groups thinking they can get home in two on par 5's. Waiting for guys that think they can get it to the green on short par 4's only to barely clear the 150. My former home course has two short par 4's, most men play whites, from there 317 and 282. In two years I've never seen anyone get it to the green. For one because of the layout both would pretty much require carrying it to the green. Neither allow for roll out because the fairway stops well short of the green. Well one has a very narrow inlet about 8 yds wide. More than distance the accuracy required escapes most amateurs to take advantage of those holes. All people see is the number, few play the holes smart.

post #18 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meltdwhiskey View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
It does make sense to use GPS to see how much farther you need to go. As for accuracy, sometimes the rangefinder measures the wrong thing. GPS could also have up to 15 yards error.

While this is true, if you use one for more than a couple rounds, incorrect distances are pretty rare.  Normally, you have a decent idea of what a distance is already - like say you are shooting backwards from your ball to the ball washer to measure your drive distance.  You already have a ballpark - let's say 250.  Most often, you are going to get a good distance right out of the gate.  But if not, the next shootable thing behind the ballwasher is often 50 or more yards Farther away.  So if it is over 300, you know you missed it.  Just shoot it 2-3 times real quick and you're good.  I can't imagine trying measure driving distances during a round and going home thinking, "I've got some numbers, but I just don't know if I should trust them."

Sure, I agree that for the application you mentioned it could be pretty accurate. Especially with multiple measurements like you described.

 

I'm not actually sure what my drive distances are at the moment, but if I do bring a rangefinder it would be to try to measure the pin from my current position. A little off topic, but that was more or less where my comment was directed.

 

I'm not sure I follow - but of course most people bring a range finder to measure from the ball to the pin.  I used the tee box / ballwasher example since this thread is about accurate drive distances.  But the same holds true for shooting the pin - in fact it is even less frequent that you can confuse the pin distance from a background object.  Since the pin is on the green, there is very rarely anything shootable near the pin.  So if you know you are in the ballpark of a 150 yard approach and you get a reading over 200, it is wrong.  And once again just shoot the pin 2-3 times in succession and you'll be fine.

 

In both cases, I'm just trying to address your statement, "As for accuracy, sometimes the rangefinder measures the wrong thing."  And I know people have trouble the first time they pick up a range finder.  Since I have one and people want to tinker with it - I see them struggle with it all the time.  But if you actually own one and have used it for a couple of rounds - you are not going to have the accuracy problem that you stated in post 10.  Getting a good measurement isn't usually a problem.

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