or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › True distance vs imaginary distance.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

True distance vs imaginary distance. - Page 3

post #37 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

Seems like 250 carry should be more than enough.

 

However, on the flip side I had a somewhat bad experience with one of the optical launch monitors and cheaper radar units ($6000 system?). On the course, I was hitting about 40 yards further than the launch monitor reported, and the salesman recommended a senior/ladies flex. I did some experimenting on my own (using a prototype board with a 6-axis gyroscope/accelerometer), and found that the heavier the shaft the better. Based upon this data, I bought some steel DG X100 wood shafts. I had them put on an old TM Burner 1.0 driver, and with a relatively relaxed drive I was hitting about 10 to 20 yards further than before and much straighter. That's about 60 yards further than the club fitters told me I could hit.

 

So, the launch monitor told me that I was hitting 40 yards shorter than on the course with my old driver (Google verified), but I ended up using a shaft made for someone with a much faster swing and ended up hitting yet another 10 to 20 yards further than before. So, in this case I went completely the opposite of what the fitter(s) told me, and have better results.

 

BTW, none of these fitters had a Trakman.

 

 

What an extreme. Don't club fitters have to pass some type of test to get certified..? I realize there can be "opinions" about something like that, but to be that far off, makes me hesitant to even consult a club fitter.

post #38 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

 

Seems like 250 carry should be more than enough.

However, on the flip side I had a somewhat bad experience with one of the optical launch monitors and cheaper radar units ($6000 system?). On the course, I was hitting about 40 yards further than the launch monitor reported, and the salesman recommended a senior/ladies flex. I did some experimenting on my own (using a prototype board with a 6-axis gyroscope/accelerometer), and found that the heavier the shaft the better. Based upon this data, I bought some steel DG X100 wood shafts. I had them put on an old TM Burner 1.0 driver, and with a relatively relaxed drive I was hitting about 10 to 20 yards further than before and much straighter. That's about 60 yards further than the club fitters told me I could hit.

So, the launch monitor told me that I was hitting 40 yards shorter than on the course with my old driver (Google verified), but I ended up using a shaft made for someone with a much faster swing and ended up hitting yet another 10 to 20 yards further than before. So, in this case I went completely the opposite of what the fitter(s) told me, and have better results.

BTW, none of these fitters had a Trakman.


What an extreme. Don't club fitters have to pass some type of test to get certified..? I realize there can be "opinions" about something like that, but to be that far off, makes me hesitant to even consult a club fitter.

Don't know why. I'm sure it works for the majority of golfers, or there would be no business in fitting.

For some reason, I can't be monitored. Maybe I do really hit only 190, but it seems like I hit much more on the course.

Don't base anything off of my experiences, just be aware that the fitting process might not be for everybody.
post #39 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post
 

 

 

What an extreme. Don't club fitters have to pass some type of test to get certified..? I realize there can be "opinions" about something like that, but to be that far off, makes me hesitant to even consult a club fitter.

That is normally the problem. Lots of people call themselves "fitters". Most aren't certified fitters and most people that think they got "fit" really only got the fast food version of a fitting.

 

If somebody has you hit some balls with different clubs, maybe check the lie with a lie board, and take a WTF measurement, then pulls some clubs off of the rack, that's not what you would normally get with a certified fitter.

 

The guys I know that have been to certified fitters spent around 4 to 6 hours getting fit and then the fitter builds a set of clubs that are MOI matched and each shaft and club are built to specs. Then they have the customer play the clubs to make sure they are happy with them and make other adjustments if necessary.

 

Then even among certified fitters some are better at their craft than others just as certified welders, meat cutters, masons, teaching pros, and almost anything else.

post #40 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 

That is normally the problem. Lots of people call themselves "fitters". Most aren't certified fitters and most people that think they got "fit" really only got the fast food version of a fitting.

 

If somebody has you hit some balls with different clubs, maybe check the lie with a lie board, and take a WTF measurement, then pulls some clubs off of the rack, that's not what you would normally get with a certified fitter.

 

The guys I know that have been to certified fitters spent around 4 to 6 hours getting fit and then the fitter builds a set of clubs that are MOI matched and each shaft and club are built to specs. Then they have the customer play the clubs to make sure they are happy with them and make other adjustments if necessary.

 

Then even among certified fitters some are better at their craft than others just as certified welders, meat cutters, masons, teaching pros, and almost anything else.

I hope you are inadvertently leaving out PCS or GCA people from your thoughts on who is qualified to properly fit clubs. They are more then qualified to understand the dynamics of club fitting, and their organizations have been around longer and have made substantial contributions to the golf industry.

post #41 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 

That is normally the problem. Lots of people call themselves "fitters". Most aren't certified fitters and most people that think they got "fit" really only got the fast food version of a fitting.

 

If somebody has you hit some balls with different clubs, maybe check the lie with a lie board, and take a WTF measurement, then pulls some clubs off of the rack, that's not what you would normally get with a certified fitter.

 

The guys I know that have been to certified fitters spent around 4 to 6 hours getting fit and then the fitter builds a set of clubs that are MOI matched and each shaft and club are built to specs. Then they have the customer play the clubs to make sure they are happy with them and make other adjustments if necessary.

 

Then even among certified fitters some are better at their craft than others just as certified welders, meat cutters, masons, teaching pros, and almost anything else.

I hope you are inadvertently leaving out PCS or GCA people from your thoughts on who is qualified to properly fit clubs. They are more then qualified to understand the dynamics of club fitting, and their organizations have been around longer and have made substantial contributions to the golf industry.


When the time comes, I should go see a real professional rather than the hacks. I spent $200 for nothing.


As it is, my current needs have been filled, and I hit far enough that I can make all the par 4s in 2 distance wise with driver-iron (which is why I don't think I only drive 190).

 

When I have been using my current swing for a year or more, then I would gladly get properly fitted. If I can find someone reputable.

post #42 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
 

I hope you are inadvertently leaving out PCS or GCA people from your thoughts on who is qualified to properly fit clubs. They are more then qualified to understand the dynamics of club fitting, and their organizations have been around longer and have made substantial contributions to the golf industry.


I wasn't trying to say who is qualified to properly fit clubs at all. Just saying that the part time high school kid working the evening shift at the big chain store pulling clubs off of the rack probably isn't among them. Better than nothing but not by much.

post #43 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 


When the time comes, I should go see a real professional rather than the hacks. I spent $200 for nothing.


As it is, my current needs have been filled, and I hit far enough that I can make all the par 4s in 2 distance wise with driver-iron (which is why I don't think I only drive 190).

 

When I have been using my current swing for a year or more, then I would gladly get properly fitted. If I can find someone reputable.

 

Shocking you had trouble at golfsmith. The one I go to the guys there are really good. I know my distances on the course, and the simulators are all great, probably with in a few yards on each club. 

 

In the end though, people just need to be smart and do there research. Don't get caught up in the up sell. Learn the lofts of each iron you hit at the simulator so you can truly gauge proper distance. If you are hitting two 6 irons, but they are 2-3 degrees off, then of course one will be hit further. If you get a club that is 6 yards farther, well that means you just created a huge gap in your wedges. Really the biggest advancement in irons has come at the distance in the long irons. Before the gap in the long irons would be very tight for amateurs. Now with hybrids, and hotter clubheads long irons really have become a lot easier to hit and have proper gaping. 

 

The only thing I look at on the simulators is ball speed, launch angle, and spin rates. From there I can tell were I am at. 

post #44 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

 


When the time comes, I should go see a real professional rather than the hacks. I spent $200 for nothing.


As it is, my current needs have been filled, and I hit far enough that I can make all the par 4s in 2 distance wise with driver-iron (which is why I don't think I only drive 190).

When I have been using my current swing for a year or more, then I would gladly get properly fitted. If I can find someone reputable.

Shocking you had trouble at golfsmith. The one I go to the guys there are really good. I know my distances on the course, and the simulators are all great, probably with in a few yards on each club. 

In the end though, people just need to be smart and do there research. Don't get caught up in the up sell. Learn the lofts of each iron you hit at the simulator so you can truly gauge proper distance. If you are hitting two 6 irons, but they are 2-3 degrees off, then of course one will be hit further. If you get a club that is 6 yards farther, well that means you just created a huge gap in your wedges. Really the biggest advancement in irons has come at the distance in the long irons. Before the gap in the long irons would be very tight for amateurs. Now with hybrids, and hotter clubheads long irons really have become a lot easier to hit and have proper gaping. 

The only thing I look at on the simulators is ball speed, launch angle, and spin rates. From there I can tell were I am at. 

Every place has good and bad salesmen. The one helping my son was really good, and we have one of the best club makers at our Golfsmith.

The issue was getting fitted with clubs that feel comfortable to swing correctly.
post #45 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


Every place has good and bad salesmen. The one helping my son was really good, and we have one of the best club makers at our Golfsmith.
 

 

Yep totally agree. I'm lucky to have found a good one near were I am at. 

post #46 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 


I wasn't trying to say who is qualified to properly fit clubs at all. Just saying that the part time high school kid working the evening shift at the big chain store pulling clubs off of the rack probably isn't among them. Better than nothing but not by much.

Fair enough. I agree with your belief on chain store reps not being the best choice for a fitting.

post #47 of 132

When I last got fitted for my Maxfli Revolution clubs back in 1997 I think it was. I picked out a med CB, they then had me hit from a lie board with a 6i, then I hit balls with tape on the face, then he took a measurement from my finger tips to the floor. He determined I needed 1*up, and 1" over, and that was it..nothing compared today's way of doing it. Sorry, just thought I'd throw that in there.

 

Happy New Years!!!

post #48 of 132

Hey quick question

The course i play on has some extreme elevation changes; the driving range drops 80 feet from the hitting area to the 250 yard mark.

I'm just curious does anyone know how elevation change effects overall distance ?

The one hole i hit driver on, Google maps shows it at 230 yards, and 21 yards below the tee box.

post #49 of 132

Usually 1 yard per yard drop or incline. Less for wedges more for driver. Most golf shots land near a 45 degree angle. 

 

So that 230 would probably play like 215

post #50 of 132

The fascination with driver distance has always been interesting to me. I play with some guys, as we all have, who seem like the only thing on their mind when playing a round is seeing how far they can bomb one of the tee. Every hole the longest hitter will say something along the lines of "I think I got you on that one" whenever we pull up to the ball to take our second shot. One day after hearing it about 10 times too many I said "Oh really? I thought we may finish the hole? Should I pick up now or keep playing?" It didn't matter that the guy was 5 strokes behind me, so long as his drive was longer than mine.

 

Great drives and average iron play is going to lose to average drives and great iron play every time. I've never met a player that I thought was being held back from being a better golfer solely because they can't drive the ball far enough.

post #51 of 132
My imaginary distances are far more consistent than the real ones. One day I'm going to play a round with my imaginary clubs to see how I fare.
post #52 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

My imaginary distances are far more consistent than the real ones. One day I'm going to play a round with my imaginary clubs to see how I fare.

All of my rounds this winter have been with imaginary clubs and I must admit, I have been playing VERY well.

post #53 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddog10 View Post

All of my rounds this winter have been with imaginary clubs and I must admit, I have been playing VERY well.
Really? I haven't taken mine on the course yet but when I practice with them I tend to get a little quick in the transition. I might want to experiment with a little imaginary lead tape to get the swing weight up a tad.
post #54 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Really? I haven't taken mine on the course yet but when I practice with them I tend to get a little quick in the transition. I might want to experiment with a little imaginary lead tape to get the swing weight up a tad.

 

What helped me is that instead of playing my real game-improvement irons I just switch to my imaginary players irons and every flaw in my swing is fixed. I've yet to hit an imaginary shot off-center, I never miss a GIR, and my drives are always in the fairway. Oh, and I can't say enough about my imaginary putter. The other day I missed an imaginary 20 foot putt... I was pissed. Never missed an imaginary putt before that.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Golf Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › True distance vs imaginary distance.